Imperial College London

Emeritus ProfessorJohnBurland

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Senior Research Investigator
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6079j.burland

 
 
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Location

 

502Skempton BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

161 results found

Wan MSP, Standing JR, Potts DM, Burland JBet al., 2019, Pore water pressure and total horizontal stress response to EPBM tunnelling in London Clay, Géotechnique, Vol: 69, Pages: 434-457, ISSN: 0016-8505

The ground response, in terms of surface and subsurface displacements, to twin-bore Crossrail tunnel construction beneath a research monitoring site in Hyde Park, London, using earth-pressure-balance machines (EPBMs) in London Clay, has recently been reported in two companion papers by the authors. This third paper presents and discusses corresponding changes in pore water pressure and total horizontal stress measured using multi-level piezometers and pushed-in spade cells. The three papers together provide a comprehensive and completely unique field monitoring case history of the short-term ground response to EPBM tunnelling in London Clay, making them invaluable for validating future numerical analyses. The fully grouted vibrating-wire piezometers were able to measure the rapid pore water pressure changes around the tunnels as they were constructed. Five distinct immediate pore water pressure responses are identified, induced by different stages of the tunnel drives as the EPBMs approached and passed the instruments. The responses are correlated with tunnel-boring machine operation variables and a postulated arching mechanism, identified for the first time through field measurements. The sense and magnitude of changes in horizontal total stress were reasonable and are correlated with overall pore water pressure changes. Both responses are linked where possible with measured subsurface displacements and generally correlate well, at least qualitatively. Limitations to the measurements and influencing factors are also discussed.

Journal article

Lo DOK, Cunningham J, Burland JB, 2018, Investigation of distress of a reinforced earth wall in Hong Kong, PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS-FORENSIC ENGINEERING, Vol: 171, Pages: 127-136, ISSN: 2043-9903

Journal article

Wan MSP, Standing JR, Potts DM, Burland JBet al., 2017, Measured short-term subsurface ground displacements from EPBM tunnelling in London Clay, Geotechnique, Vol: 67, Pages: 748-779, ISSN: 1751-7656

Subsurface ground displacements from the construction of the twin-bore Crossrail tunnels in London Clay by earth pressure balance machines (EPBMs) are presented and discussed, complementing a companion paper by the authors that focused on the surface response. Both papers report vertical and horizontal displacements, in this case measured using comprehensive arrays of instruments installed within boreholes in Hyde Park, London. The Crossrail tunnels are deeper than those cited in most UK case histories concerning tunnelling in stiff clay. Clear insights were gained into subsurface displacement mechanisms: an ‘inward’ displacement field was observed around the Crossrail tunnel construction, in contrast to the ‘outward’ displacement field that developed around the shallower Channel Tunnel Rail Link tunnels constructed east of London using similar EPBMs in London Clay. This has important implications when estimating subsurface displacements using currently available empirical methods. Appraisal of the EPBM operational variables suggests that the relative magnitude of face and tail grout pressures to overburden stress is the key factor contributing to the opposing senses of the observed displacement fields. Earlier tunnelling-induced strain softening of the London Clay is evident from greater subsurface incremental volume losses and settlement trough width parameters relating to subsequent tunnel construction.

Journal article

Wan MSP, Standing JR, Potts DM, Burland JBet al., 2016, Measured short-term ground surface response to EPBM tunnelling in London Clay, Géotechnique, Vol: 67, Pages: 420-445, ISSN: 0016-8505

Earth-pressure-balance machines (EPBMs) were used for the construction of Crossrail tunnels in London, providing opportunities for field investigation of consequent ground response. Analysed results from an instrumented research site in Hyde Park with extensive surface and subsurface monitoring arrays are presented and discussed. The Crossrail tunnels at the site are 34·5 m below ground, deeper than those in most case histories of tunnelling in stiff clay in the UK. This paper characterises the tunnelling-induced ground response, both ‘greenfield’ and in the proximity of the existing Central Line tunnels, dealing with measurements at the ground surface. A companion paper covers the subsurface ground response. Vertical and horizontal ground surface displacements were obtained from manual precise levelling and micrometer stick measurements. Several key findings will benefit future tunnelling projects involving EPBMs. Volume loss values measured at the instrumented site were low, being less than 0·8% and 1·4% for the first and second tunnel drives respectively, higher values being associated with ground softening from the first tunnel construction. Smaller volume losses were recorded in the vicinity of the existing Central Line tunnels, compared with the greenfield location, suggesting that their presence inhibited the development of ground movements. Asymmetric settlement troughs developed due to either the nearby pre-existing tunnels or the construction of the first tunnel. Marginally smaller values of trough width parameter, Ky, were determined for these deeper tunnels compared with previous greenfield ground case histories. Resultant vectors of ground surface displacement were directed to well-defined point-sinks above the tunnel axis level.

Journal article

Yu J, Standing J, Vollum R, Potts D, Burland Jet al., 2016, Experimental investigations of bolted segmental grey cast iron lining behaviour, Tunnelling and Underground Space Technology, Vol: 61, Pages: 161-178, ISSN: 0886-7798

Theneed for the research reported in this paper was driven by the Crossrail project in London for which new tunnels wereconstructed close to numerous existing operational tunnels of the London Underground (LU) network. This research component is based on experimental work conducted on half-scale grey cast iron (GCI) tunnel lining segments with chemical composition similar to the Victorian age GCI segments in the LUnetwork. This paper discussesthe deformationbehaviour of the bolted segmental lining underthe influence of factorssuch as overburden pressure, bolt preload and presence of grommetsat small distortions. The measured behaviour of the segmental lining is compared against the calculated response of a continuous liningbased on the assumption of elasticity. The industry practice for tunnel lining assessment is to calculate the induced bending moment in the tunnel lining using an elastic continuum model, while adopting a reduced lining stiffness to take into account the presence of the joints. Case studies have recorded that both loosening and tightening of lining bolts have been used as mitigation measures to reduce the impact of new tunnel excavations on existing GCI tunnels.The experimental work on the half-scaleGCI lining has shown that a bolted segmental lining behaves as a continuous ringunder the small distortionsimposed when subjected to hoop forces relevant to the depth of burial of LU tunnels. In the presence of hoop force, joint opening was minimal and the magnitude of preload in the bolts had little impact on the behaviour of the lining.It is therefore concluded that disturbance of the bolts in existing tunnels is not recommended as a mitigation measure as in addition to being ineffective it is both time consuming and introduces the risk of damaging the tunnel lining flanges.

Journal article

Burland JB, Jamiolkowski MB, Viggiani C, 2015, Underexcavating the Tower of Pisa: Back to Future, GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING, Vol: 46, Pages: 126-135, ISSN: 0046-5828

Journal article

Standing JR, Potts DM, Vollum R, Burland JB, Tsiampousi A, Afshan S, Yu JB, Wan MSP, Avgerinos Vet al., 2015, Investigating the effect of tunnelling on existing tunnels, Underground Design and Construction Conference, Publisher: IOM3, Pages: 301-312

A major research project investigating the effect of tunnelling on existing tunnels has beencompleted at Imperial College London. This subject is always of great concern during theplanning and execution of underground tunnelling works in the urban environment. Many citiesalready have extensive existing tunnel networks and so it is necessary to construct new tunnels ata level beneath them. The associated deformations that take place during tunnelling have to becarefully assessed and their impact on the existing tunnels estimated. Of particular concern is theserviceability of tunnels used for underground trains where the kinematic envelope must not beimpinged upon. The new Crossrail transport line under construction in London passes beneathnumerous tunnels including a number of those forming part of the London Underground network

Conference paper

Yu J, Standing J, Vollum R, Potts DM, Burland JBet al., 2015, Stress and Strain monitoring at Tottenham Court Road Station, London, UK, Proceedings of the ICE - Structures and Buildings, Pages: 107-117, ISSN: 0965-0911

The redevelopment of Tottenham Court Road Underground Station started in 2011 as part of the Tube Upgrade Plan to improve and increase the capacity of the existing facility. The plan is to upgrade the station by 2016 to meet an estimated demand of more than 200,000 journeys per day once Crossrail is built. During April to November 2011, major structural work was carried out on the Northern Line platform tunnels as part of the station upgrade. This included removing grey cast iron tunnellining segments on the platform side to allow for construction of new cross passages to improve access to the platforms. The upgrade works provided an opportunity to trial in-tunnel instrumentation prior to implementation in other London Underground (LUL) tunnels which interface with the Crossrail project. Mechanical and electrical resistance strain gauges were installed on tunnel segments to make discrete measurements of changes in strain due to unloading as the segments were removed from the tunnel rings. Linear variable differential transformer type displacement transducers were installed to make continuous measurements of the opening and closing of circumferential and longitudinal joints on trackside segments which are left insitu and affected by adjacent excavations. This paper describes the installation process and highlights the lessons learnt for future applications. The insitu strain measurements are presented and compared to the expected response based on laboratory tests conducted on grey cast iron tunnel segments in the 1970s. The changes in strain measured by both types of strain gauges agreed well with the estimated changes assuming full overburden unloading.

Journal article

Standing JR, Potts DM, Vollum R, Burland JB, Yu JBY, Wan MSP, Avgerinos Vet al., 2015, Research into the effect of tunnelling on existing tunnels, Pages: 515-520

© The authors and ICE Publishing: All rights reserved, 2015. Increasing demands for providing transport systems in the urban environment has led to many tunnelling projects being undertaken worldwide. Many of the cities where new tunnels are to be constructed already have a comprehensive underground network of tunnels for both transport and services. New tunnels often have to be aligned beneath these and frequently there are concerns that their construction may cause unacceptable deformations of Ibe existing tunnels, potentially hindering their serviceability and in the extreme threatening their stability. The Crossrail project, currently underway in London, involves tunnelling beneath numerous existing tunnels. It therefore has provided a great opportunity to study this complex boundary value problem. This paper describes the philosophy behind a comprehensive research project, run in conjunction with the Crossrail construction, which has an emphasis on the response of older tunnels lined with grey cast iron segments. There is a focus on how the Central Line tunnels responded to new twin tunnel construction beneath them. The five main strands of the research arc: field monitoring within and around the existing tunnels; numerical analyses of the field conditions; structural testing of a half-scale grey cast iron segmental ring; numerical analyses of the ring and two-segment tests performed; advanced laboratory testing of London Clay samples taken during installation of field instrumentation. These activities link into each other. Some preliminary results are presented and the main finding to date arc summarised.

Conference paper

Bym T, Marketos G, Burland JB, O'Sullivan Cet al., 2013, Use of a two-dimensional discrete-element line-sink model to gain insight into tunnelling-induced deformations, Geotechnique

Journal article

Puzrin AM, Burland JB, Standing JR, 2012, Simple approach to predicting ground displacements caused by tunnelling in undrained anisotropic elastic soil, GEOTECHNIQUE, Vol: 62, Pages: 341-352, ISSN: 0016-8505

Journal article

Potts D, Zdravkovic L, 2012, Computer Analysis principles in geotechnical engineering, ICE manual of Geotechnical Engineering - Volume 1 Geotechnical Engineering Principles, Problematic Soils and Site Investigation, Editors: Burland, Skinner, Brown, Publisher: Institution of Civil Engineers, Pages: 35-57

Book chapter

Burland JB, Jamiolkowski MB, Viggiani C, 2009, Leaning Tower of Pisa: Behaviour after Stabilization Operations, International Journal of Geoengineering Case Histories, Vol: 1, Pages: 156-169, ISSN: 1790-2045

It is well known that the foundations of the Leaning Tower of Pisa were stabilised using the method ofunderexcavation to reduce the southward inclination of the Tower by about 10 percent in combination with controlling theseasonally fluctuating water table beneath the north side. Having been closed to the public since early in 1990, the Towerwas re-opened in December 2001. The paper summarises the response of the Tower during the period of implementation ofthe stabilisation works. Monitoring of the movements of the Tower has been continuing and the observations obtained since2001 are presented. It is shown that over the six years between 2003 and 2008 the induced rate of northward rotation of theTower has been steadily reducing to less than 0.2 arc seconds per year. Similarly the rate of induced settlement of thecentre of the foundation has been steadily reducing and is approaching the background rate of settlement of the Piazza.Piezometer measurements close to the north side of the foundation shows that the drainage system has been successful instabilising the groundwater levels beneath the north side of the Tower’s foundation. The paper concludes with a briefdiscussion on the possible future behaviour of the Tower.

Journal article

Burland JB, Dean ETR, Gudehus G, Muhunthan B, Collins IFet al., 2008, Interlocking, and peak and design strengths - Discussion, GEOTECHNIQUE, Vol: 58, Pages: 527-532, ISSN: 0016-8505

Journal article

Burland JB, 2008, The founders of Geotechnique, GEOTECHNIQUE, Vol: 58, Pages: 327-341, ISSN: 0016-8505

Journal article

Burland JB, 2008, Personal reflections on the teaching of soil mechanics, 1st International Conference on Education and Training in Geo-Engineering Science - Soil Mechanics, Geotechnical Engineering, Engineering Geology and Rock Mechanics, Publisher: CRC PRESS-TAYLOR & FRANCIS GROUP, Pages: 35-48

Conference paper

Burland JB, 2008, A case history of the failure of some silos during discharge, International Conference on Structures and Granular Solids - From Scientific Principles to Engineering Applications, Publisher: CRC PRESS-TAYLOR & FRANCIS GROUP, Pages: 135-143

Conference paper

Georgiannou VN, Burland JB, 2006, A laboratory study of slip surface formation in an intact natural stiff clay, GEOTECHNIQUE, Vol: 56, Pages: 551-559, ISSN: 0016-8505

Journal article

Burland J B, 2006, Interaction between structural and geotechnical engineers, The Structural Engineer, Vol: 84, Pages: 29-37

Journal article

Burland JB, 2006, Vote of thanks, GEOTECHNIQUE, Vol: 56, Pages: 122-122, ISSN: 0016-8505

Journal article

Standing JR, Burland JB, 2006, Unexpected tunnelling volume losses in the Westminster area, London, GEOTECHNIQUE, Vol: 56, Pages: 11-26, ISSN: 0016-8505

Journal article

Franzius JN, Potts DM, Burland JB, 2006, The response of surface structures to tunnel construction, PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS-GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING, Vol: 159, Pages: 3-17, ISSN: 1353-2618

Journal article

Standing JR, Burland JB, 2006, Investigating variations in tunnelling volume loss - a case study, 5th International Conference on Getechnical Aspects of Underground Construction in Soft Ground, Publisher: TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, Pages: 305-+

Conference paper

Franzius JN, Potts DM, Burland JB, 2006, Twist behaviour of buildings due to tunnel induced ground movement, 5th International Conference on Getechnical Aspects of Underground Construction in Soft Ground, Publisher: TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, Pages: 107-+

Conference paper

Franzius JN, Potts DM, Addenbrooke TI, Burland JBet al., 2005, The influence of building weight on tunnelling-induced ground and building deformation, SOILS AND FOUNDATIONS, Vol: 45, Pages: 168-169, ISSN: 0038-0806

Journal article

Franzius JN, Potts DM, Burland JB, 2005, The influence of soil anisotropy and K-0 on ground surface movements resulting from tunnel excavation, GEOTECHNIQUE, Vol: 55, Pages: 189-199, ISSN: 0016-8505

Journal article

Franzius JN, Potts DM, Burland JB, 2005, The influence of soil anisotropy andK0on ground surface movements resulting from tunnel excavation, Géotechnique, Vol: 55, Pages: 189-199, ISSN: 0016-8505

Journal article

Franzius JN, Potts DM, Addenbrook TI, Burland JBet al., 2004, The influence of building weight on tunnelling-induced ground and building deformation, 3rd International Symposium on Geotechnical Aspects of Underground Construction in Soft Ground, Publisher: JAPANESE GEOTECHNICAL SOC, Pages: 25-38, ISSN: 0038-0806

Conference paper

Johnston G, Burland J, 2004, Some historical examples of underexcavation, London, Conference on advances in geotechnical engineering, London, England, Publisher: Thomas Telford, Pages: 1068-1079

Conference paper

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