Imperial College London

ProfessorJonathanHaskel

Business School

Chair in Economics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8563j.haskel Website CV

 
 
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Assistant

 

Miss Donna Sutherland-Smith +44 (0)20 7594 1916

 
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Location

 

Room 296Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Summary

Information on this page:

Profile

Jonathan Haskel is Professor of Economics at Imperial College Business School, Imperial College London and Director of the Doctoral Programme at the School.  He was previously Professor and Head of Department at the Department of Economics, Queen Mary, University of London.  He has taught at the University of Bristol and London Business School and been a visiting professor at the Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College, USA; Stern School of Business, New York University, USA;  and the Australian National University. 

He is an elected member of the Conference on Research in Income and Wealth (CRIW) and a research associate of the Centre for Economic Policy Research, the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, and the IZA, Bonn.

Since September 2015, he has been a member of the Financial Conduct Authority Competition Decisions Committee and the Payment System Regulator Enforcement and Competition Decisions Committee.

Since February 2016, he has been a non-Executive Director of the UK Statistics Authority.

Between 2001-2010 was a Member, Reporting Panel of the Competition Commission (now the Competition and Markets Authority), on market inquiries into Mobile Phones, Home Credit and Airports, and the EMAP/ABI merger.

He has been on the editorial boards of Economica, Journal of Industrial Economics and Economic Policy.

Between 2013 and 2016, he was an elected member of the Council of the Royal Economic Society and between November 2012 and December 2015, a member of the "Research, Innovation, and Science Policy Experts" (RISE) high level group advising the European Commissioner for Research, Innovation, and Science on policy.

Short research statement: My main research interests are productivity, innovation, intangible investment and growth.  I currently study (a) how much firms investment in “intangible” or "knowledge" assets, such as software, R&D and new business processes (b) how much such investment contributes to economic growth as whole and (c) what public policy implications there might be, especially for science policy.  This work uses a mix of data at the levelsof company, individual, industry and whole economy.

My  work on the contribution of science to economic growth was kindly extensively quoted by ministers in the run up to the 2010 Spending Review where the science budget escaped large cutsHere is a video of me talking about why the science budget should be defended. 

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BOOKS AND Papers in progress:


BOOK

Haskel, J and Westlake, S, (2017), Capitalism without Capital: the Rise of the Intangible Economy.  Princeton University Press, November. Amazon.co.ukAmazon.com.  Princeton University Press site.  Contents and first chapter.

PAPERS


Repec page Papers 


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Recent talks and seminars



RES/ONS/RSS meeting, “Challenges for Economic Statistics in the Digital Age”, Wednesday 05 July 2017, 3:00pm - 6:00pm, slides.


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Jonathan’s C.V. 

My blog

My twitter account

Link to Google Scholar

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Full contact details

Prof. Jonathan Haskel
Imperial College Business School
South Kensingon Campus,
Tanaka Building, Room 296
Exhibition Road
London SW7 2AZ
UK
E: j.haskel@ic.ac.uk
T: +44-20 7594 8563
T: +44-20 7594 1916(Administrator)
F: +44-20 7594 5915
W: www.imperial.ac.uk/people/j.haskel

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Other Info

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Publications

Journals

Corrado C, Haskel J, Jona-Lasinio C, Public intangibles: the public sector and economic growth in the SNA, Review of Income and Wealth, ISSN:1475-4991

Haskel J, Knowledge spillovers, ICT and productivity growth, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, ISSN:1468-0084

Haskel J, The Trade and Labour Approaches to Wage Inequality

Haskel J, Sadun R, Regulation and UK Retailing Productivity: Evidence from Micro Data, Iza Discussion Paper

More Publications