Imperial College London

ProfessorJonathanHaskel

Business School

Chair in Economics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8563j.haskel Website CV

 
 
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Assistant

 

Miss Donna Sutherland-Smith +44 (0)20 7594 1916

 
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Location

 

Room 296Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

120 results found

Corrado C, Haskel J, Jona-Lasinio C, Public intangibles: the public sector and economic growth in the SNA, Review of Income and Wealth, ISSN: 1475-4991

This paper sets out a framework for analyzing the impact of public investments on industry-level productivity and economic growth. The concept of capital in the public sector is broad-ened from that which is mostly tangible (e.g., physical infrastructure) to that which alsoincludes intangibles and long-lasting societal assets. For the analysis of public investments,we find that in addition to expanding the asset boundary, national accounts also need to: (a)impute a net return to government and other nonmarket capital—or provide industry-leveldata by institutional sector of origin, allowing researchers to do so; (b) include all publicpayments to industry in industry-level gross operating surplus (i.e., all subsidies, productionand product, and the annuity value of investment grants); and (c) provide crosswalks forkey components of government expenditure by function of government (e.g., public funds forextramural R&D or worker training) to kind-of-activity classifications used for industries.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Haskel J, Knowledge spillovers, ICT and productivity growth, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, ISSN: 1468-0084

This paper looks at the channels through which intangible assets affect productivity.The econometric analysis exploits a new dataset on intangible investment (INTAN-Invest)in conjunction with EUKLEMS productivity estimates for 10 EU member states from 1998to 2007. We find that (a) the output elasticity of intangible capital depends upon ICT inten-sity, consistent with complementarities between ICT and intangible capital; (b) non-R&Dintangible capital has higher estimated output elasticities than its factor shares, as does(c) labour quality. The last two findings are consistent with spillovers from investments inknowledge-based/intangible capital and skills.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Haskel J, The Trade and Labour Approaches to Wage Inequality

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Haskel J, Sadun R, Regulation and UK Retailing Productivity: Evidence from Micro Data, IZA Discussion Paper

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Corrado C, Haskel J, Jona-Lasino C, 2017, Knowledge Spillovers, ICT and Productivity Growth, Publisher: WILEY

WORKING PAPER

Edquist H, Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Li X, Lindquist Eet al., 2017, How important are mobile broadband networks for global economic development?, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

Since the beginning of the 21st century mobile broadband has diffused very rapidly in many countries around the world. This paper investigates to what extent the diffusion of mobile broadband has impacted economic development in terms of GDP. The results show that there isa significanteffect from mobile broadband on GDP both when mobile broadband is first introduced and gradually as mobile broadband diffuses throughout different economies. Based on a two stage model we are able to conclude that on average a 10 percent increase of mobile broadband adoption causes a 0.6–2.8 percent increase in economic growth depending on the model specifications.

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge P, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2017, Spillovers from R&D and Other Intangible Investment: Evidence from UK Industries, Review of Income and Wealth, Vol: 63, Pages: S22-S48, ISSN: 0034-6586

© 2016 International Association for Research in Income and Wealth Many agree that evidence exists consistent with spillovers from R & D. But is there any evidence of spillovers from a broader range of intangibles, such as software, design or training? We collect investment data for these wider intangibles for a panel of seven UK industries 1992–2007. Using the industry-level method in the R & D literature, e.g. Griliches (), we regress industry TFP growth on lagged external knowledge stock growth, where the latter are outside industry measures weighted by matrices based on (a) flows of intermediate consumption or (b) workers. Our main new result is that we find (controlling for time and industry effects) statistically significant correlations between TFP growth and knowledge stock growth in (a) external R & D and (b) total intangibles (excluding R & D). We show our results are robust to controls for imperfect competition and non-constant returns; likewise they are robust to including foreign R & D, and other controls, and various lags.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, 2017, Network effects and productive externalities from ICT and knowledge capital

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, Corrado C, Jona-Lasinio C, 2017, Intangibles, ICT and industry productivity growth: Evidence from the EU, The World Economy: Growth or Stagnation?, Editors: Jorgenson, Fukao, Timmer, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Pages: 281-318, ISBN: 9781316534502

BOOK CHAPTER

Smith PA, Self A, Michaelson J, Spence A, Haskel J, Murtagh F, Nason G, Caan W, Goldstein H, King T, Cocchi D, Dorling D, Summa MG, Le Roux B, Hall JF, Herzberg AM, Liu H, Longford NT, Mateu J, Rondinella T, Cocchi D, Ruggeri K, Stehlik M, Strelec L, VanderWeele TJ, Yu K, Tian M, Zini A, Lara L, Porcu Eet al., 2017, Discussion on the paper by Allin and Hand, JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL STATISTICAL SOCIETY SERIES A-STATISTICS IN SOCIETY, Vol: 180, Pages: 24-43, ISSN: 0964-1998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Goodridge P, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2016, Accounting for the UK Productivity Puzzle: A Decomposition and Predictions, Economica, ISSN: 0013-0427

© 2016 The London School of Economics and Political Science. This paper revisits the UK productivity puzzle using new data on outputs and inputs and clarifying the role of output mismeasurement, input growth and industry effects. Our data indicate an implied labour productivity gap of 13 percentage points in 2011 relative to the productivity level on pre-recession trends. We find that: (a) the labour productivity puzzle is a TFP puzzle, since it is not explained by the contributions of labour or capital services; (b) the reallocation of labour between industries deepens rather than explains the puzzle (i.e. there has been a reallocation of hours away from low-productivity industries and toward high productivity industries); (c) capitalization of R & D does not explain the productivity puzzle; (d) assuming increased scrapping rates since the recession, a 25% (50%) increase in depreciation rates post-2009 can potentially explain 15% (31%) of the productivity puzzle; (e) industry data show that 35% of the TFP puzzle can be explained by weak TFP growth in the oil & gas and finance sectors; and (f) cyclical effects via factor utilization could potentially explain 17% of the productivity puzzle. Continued weakness in finance would suggest a future lowering of TFP growth to around 0.8% p.a. from a baseline of 0.9% p.a.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, 2016, Big Data in UK industries: an intangible investment approach, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

In Goodridge and Haskel (2015b) we present an economic framework for measuring the contribution of Big Data to UK growth, building on measures of investment and employment presented in Goodridge and Haskel (2015a) and Chebli, Goodridge et al. (2015) respectively. In this paper we extend that framework to present industry estimates of UK investment and employment in producing data-based information and knowledge assets, and their contribution to industry-level growth. In doing so, we focus on industries that are considered to be intensive users of knowledge or intangible capital, including for instance Financial services and Manufacturing. We find that the four industries: Information and Communication, Professional and Administrative Services, Financial Services and Manufacturing account for 88% of big data employment and 89% of investments in data-based assets in the UK market sector. Similarly, of the total contribution of data-based assets to UK growth, we find that it is fully accounted for by these four industries

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Edquist H, 2016, The economic contribution of the “C” in ICT: evidence from OECD countries, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2016, UK intangible investment and growth: new measures of UK investment in knowledge assets and intellectual property rights

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, 2016, Intangibles, mismeasurement and the international productivity slowdown, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, 2016, Do Poor Countries Catch Up to Rich Countries? Review Article on Productivity Convergence: Theory and Evidence by Edward Wolff, INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTIVITY MONITOR, Vol: 30, Pages: 111-117, ISSN: 1492-9759

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Goodridge PR, Chebli O, Haskel J, 2015, Measuring activity in big data: New estimates of big data employment in the UK market sector, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, 2015, How does big data affect GDP? Theory and evidence for the UK., Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, 2015, How much is UK business investing in big data?, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, 2015, Understanding innovation better: an intangible investment approach, ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF ACCOUNTING & ECONOMICS, Vol: 22, Pages: 13-23, ISSN: 1608-1625

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Haskel J, Goodridge P, Hughes A, Wallis Get al., 2015, The contribution of public and private R&D to UK productivity growth, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, Goodridge P, Hughes A, Wallis Get al., 2015, The contribution of public and private R&D to UK productivity growth, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2014, The “C” in ICT: communications capital, spillovers and UK growth, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2014, UK Innovation Index 2014, UK Innovation Index 2014, Publisher: Nesta, 14/07

REPORT

Haskel J, Goodridge P, Wallis G, 2014, UK investment in intangible assets: Report for NESTA, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, Goodridge P, Wallis G, 2014, Estimating UK investment in intangible assets and Intellectual Property Rights, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, Haskel J, Hughes A, Bascavusoglu-Moreau Eet al., 2014, The economic significance of the UK science base: a report for the Campaign for Science and Engineering, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Corrado C, Haskel J, Jona-Lasinio C, Iommi Met al., 2013, Innovation and intangible investment in Europe, Japan, and the United States, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY, Vol: 29, Pages: 261-286, ISSN: 0266-903X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dal Borgo M, Goodridge P, Haskel J, Pesole Aet al., 2013, Productivity and Growth in UK Industries: An Intangible Investment Approach, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS, Vol: 75, Pages: 806-834, ISSN: 0305-9049

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Goodridge P, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2013, Can Intangible Investment Explain the UK Productivity Puzzle?

This paper investigates whether intangibles might explain the UK productivity puzzle. We note that since the recession: (a) firms have upskilled faster than before; (b) intangible investment in R & D and software has risen whereas tangible investment has fallen; and (c) intangible and telecoms equipment investment slowed in advance of the recession. We have therefore tested to see if: (a) what looks like labour hoarding is actually firms keeping workers who are employed in creating intangible assets; and (b) the current slowdown in TFP growth is due to the spillover effects of the past slowdown in R & D and telecoms equipment investment. Our main findings are: (a) measured market sector real value added growth since the start of 2008 is understated by 1.6 per cent due to the omission of intangibles; and (b) 0.75 per cent per annum of the TFP growth slowdown can be accounted for by the slowdown in intangible and telecoms investment in the early 2000s. Taken together intangible investment can therefore account for around 5 percentage points of the 16 per cent productivity puzzle. © 2013 National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

WORKING PAPER

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