Imperial College London

ProfessorJonathanHaskel

Business School

Chair in Economics
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8563j.haskel Website CV

 
 
//

Assistant

 

Miss Donna Sutherland-Smith +44 (0)20 7594 1916

 
//

Location

 

296Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

125 results found

Goodridge P, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2018, Accounting for the UK Productivity Puzzle: A Decomposition and Predictions, ECONOMICA, Vol: 85, Pages: 581-605, ISSN: 0013-0427

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Haskel J, Corrado C, Jona-Lasinio C, 2018, Productivity growth, capital reallocation and the financial crisis: evidence from Europe and the US

WORKING PAPER

Corrado C, Haskel J, Jona-Lasinio C, 2017, Public Intangibles: The Public Sector and Economic Growth in the SNA, REVIEW OF INCOME AND WEALTH, Vol: 63, Pages: S355-S380, ISSN: 0034-6586

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Corrado C, Haskel J, Jona-Lasino C, 2017, Knowledge Spillovers, ICT and Productivity Growth, Publisher: WILEY

WORKING PAPER

Edquist H, Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Li X, Lindquist Eet al., 2017, How important are mobile broadband networks for global economic development?, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

Since the beginning of the 21st century mobile broadband has diffused very rapidly in many countries around the world. This paper investigates to what extent the diffusion of mobile broadband has impacted economic development in terms of GDP. The results show that there isa significanteffect from mobile broadband on GDP both when mobile broadband is first introduced and gradually as mobile broadband diffuses throughout different economies. Based on a two stage model we are able to conclude that on average a 10 percent increase of mobile broadband adoption causes a 0.6–2.8 percent increase in economic growth depending on the model specifications.

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge P, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2017, SPILLOVERS FROM R&D AND OTHER INTANGIBLE INVESTMENT: EVIDENCE FROM UK INDUSTRIES, REVIEW OF INCOME AND WEALTH, Vol: 63, Pages: S22-S48, ISSN: 0034-6586

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Edquist H, 2017, Network effects and productive externalities from ICT and knowledge capital

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, Corrado C, Jona-Lasinio C, 2017, Intangibles, ICT and industry productivity growth: Evidence from the EU, The World Economy: Growth or Stagnation?, Editors: Jorgenson, Fukao, Timmer, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Pages: 281-318, ISBN: 9781316534502

BOOK CHAPTER

Haskel J, Westlake S, 2017, Capitalism without Capital The Rise of the Intangible Economy, Publisher: Princeton University Press, ISBN: 9781400888320

But this is not just a familiar story of the so-called new economy. Capitalism without Capital shows that the growing importance of intangible assets has also played a role in some of the big economic changes of the last decade.

BOOK

Smith PA, Self A, Michaelson J, Spence A, Haskel J, Murtagh F, Nason G, Caan W, Goldstein H, King T, Cocchi D, Dorling D, Summa MG, Le Roux B, Hall JF, Herzberg AM, Liu H, Longford NT, Mateu J, Rondinella T, Cocchi D, Ruggeri K, Stehlik M, Strelec L, VanderWeele TJ, Yu K, Tian M, Zini A, Lara L, Porcu Eet al., 2017, Discussion on the paper by Allin and Hand, JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL STATISTICAL SOCIETY SERIES A-STATISTICS IN SOCIETY, Vol: 180, Pages: 24-43, ISSN: 0964-1998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Corrado C, Haskel J, Jona-Lasinio C, 2016, Intangibles, ICT and industry productivity growth: Evidence from the EU, The World Economy: Growth or Stagnation?, Pages: 319-346, ISBN: 9781316534502

© Cambridge University Press 2016. Using intangible investment data by industry for fourteen EU countries in 1995-2010 we investigate industry growth accounting and complementarities between intangibles and ICT. We find: (a) intangible investment has grown in manufacturing and services, but most strongly in services; (b) the contribution of intangibles to labor productivity growth is similar in both manufacturing and services and in the high growth economies (Austria, Germany, Finland, France, Netherlands, UK) exceeds the contribution of labor quality; (c) the very large size of the service sector means that countries with good manufacturing but poor service productivity growth (Germany and France) have done relatively badly overall and those with good service sector growth (UK, Netherlands) have performed well; (d) Spain and Italy have very low labor productivity growth due to very low total factor productivity (TFP) growth; and (e) we find evidence of complementarities between intangible capital and information and communications technology (ICT). Empirical evidence shows that once intangible capital is included in a sources-of-growth analysis it accounts for 20-33 percent of labor productivity growth in the market sector of the United States and European Union economies. As a consequence, the measurement of intangible investment is a potentially important addition to both sources-of-growth analysis and national accounting practice. Following the work of Corrado et al. (2005, 2009) and Nakamura (1999), building in turn on the work of Machlup (1962), among others, major research efforts were undertaken to measure intangible investment and intangible capital for the business sector of European countries (INNODRIVE and COINVEST FP7 European funded projects). This led to the development of the INTAN-Invest harmonized framework for measuring intangible investment in these countries. At the same time, estimates for many other countries (not necessarily harmonized)

BOOK CHAPTER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, 2016, Big Data in UK industries: an intangible investment approach, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

In Goodridge and Haskel (2015b) we present an economic framework for measuring the contribution of Big Data to UK growth, building on measures of investment and employment presented in Goodridge and Haskel (2015a) and Chebli, Goodridge et al. (2015) respectively. In this paper we extend that framework to present industry estimates of UK investment and employment in producing data-based information and knowledge assets, and their contribution to industry-level growth. In doing so, we focus on industries that are considered to be intensive users of knowledge or intangible capital, including for instance Financial services and Manufacturing. We find that the four industries: Information and Communication, Professional and Administrative Services, Financial Services and Manufacturing account for 88% of big data employment and 89% of investments in data-based assets in the UK market sector. Similarly, of the total contribution of data-based assets to UK growth, we find that it is fully accounted for by these four industries

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Edquist H, 2016, The economic contribution of the “C” in ICT: evidence from OECD countries, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2016, UK intangible investment and growth: new measures of UK investment in knowledge assets and intellectual property rights

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, 2016, Intangibles, mismeasurement and the international productivity slowdown, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, 2016, Do Poor Countries Catch Up to Rich Countries? Review Article on Productivity Convergence: Theory and Evidence by Edward Wolff, INTERNATIONAL PRODUCTIVITY MONITOR, Vol: 30, Pages: 111-117, ISSN: 1492-9759

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Goodridge PR, Chebli O, Haskel J, 2015, Measuring activity in big data: New estimates of big data employment in the UK market sector, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, 2015, How does big data affect GDP? Theory and evidence for the UK., Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, 2015, How much is UK business investing in big data?, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, 2015, Understanding innovation better: an intangible investment approach, ASIA-PACIFIC JOURNAL OF ACCOUNTING & ECONOMICS, Vol: 22, Pages: 13-23, ISSN: 1608-1625

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Haskel J, Goodridge P, Hughes A, Wallis Get al., 2015, The contribution of public and private R&D to UK productivity growth, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, Goodridge P, Hughes A, Wallis Get al., 2015, The contribution of public and private R&D to UK productivity growth, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2014, The “C” in ICT: communications capital, spillovers and UK growth, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Goodridge PR, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2014, UK Innovation Index 2014, UK Innovation Index 2014, Publisher: Nesta, 14/07

REPORT

Haskel J, Goodridge P, Wallis G, 2014, UK investment in intangible assets: Report for NESTA, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, Goodridge P, Wallis G, 2014, Estimating UK investment in intangible assets and Intellectual Property Rights, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Haskel J, Haskel J, Hughes A, Bascavusoglu-Moreau Eet al., 2014, The economic significance of the UK science base: a report for the Campaign for Science and Engineering, Publisher: Imperial College Business School

WORKING PAPER

Corrado C, Haskel J, Jona-Lasinio C, Iommi Met al., 2013, Innovation and intangible investment in Europe, Japan, and the United States, OXFORD REVIEW OF ECONOMIC POLICY, Vol: 29, Pages: 261-286, ISSN: 0266-903X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dal Borgo M, Goodridge P, Haskel J, Pesole Aet al., 2013, Productivity and Growth in UK Industries: An Intangible Investment Approach, OXFORD BULLETIN OF ECONOMICS AND STATISTICS, Vol: 75, Pages: 806-834, ISSN: 0305-9049

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Goodridge P, Haskel J, Wallis G, 2013, Can Intangible Investment Explain the UK Productivity Puzzle?

This paper investigates whether intangibles might explain the UK productivity puzzle. We note that since the recession: (a) firms have upskilled faster than before; (b) intangible investment in R&D and software has risen whereas tangible investment has fallen; and (c) intangible and telecoms equipment investment slowed in advance of the recession. We have therefore tested to see if: (a) what looks like labour hoarding is actually firms keeping workers who are employed in creating intangible assets; and (b) the current slowdown in TFP growth is due to the spillover effects of the past slowdown in R&D and telecoms equipment investment. Our main findings are: (a) measured market sector real value added growth since the start of 2008 is understated by 1.6 per cent due to the omission of intangibles; and (b) 0.75 per cent per annum of the TFP growth slowdown can be accounted for by the slowdown in intangible and telecoms investment in the early 2000s. Taken together intangible investment can therefore account for around 5 percentage points of the 16 per cent productivity puzzle. © 2013 National Institute of Economic and Social Research.

WORKING PAPER

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00575315&limit=30&person=true