Imperial College London

DrJohnHeap

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences

Lecturer in Synthetic Biology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5355j.heap

 
 
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Location

 

Bessemer BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Metabolic and Network Engineering - LS3-MNE

Aims

Firstly, the aim of the course is to introduce students to the theory and methodology that is used to engineer biology for an applied objective. Secondly, the aim is for students to appreciate (in part through direct experience) the challenges involved in the design, engineering and evaluation of biocatalytic systems. Thirdly, students will learn about the challenges and opportunities related to using engineered biology for commercial industrial application through direct discussions with representatives of industry and entrepreneurship. The course focuses on two distinct sub-fields of biological engineering, the micro-level pathway/catalyst (metabolic engineering) and the macro-level whole-cell system (network engineering).

Objectives include:

  • Understand key factors that control metabolism and gene networks
  • Know what tool/method to choose in order to achieve engineering objective and analyze/predict its outcome
  • Design alternative strategies to overcome engineering challenges
  • Understand factors that limit commercial use of engineered microorganisms
  • Research and present a strategy to convert an idea into a biotechnological business

Role

Lecturer

Synthetic Biology - LS3-SB

Aims

 Background & Aims: The advent of the molecular biology age in the 1970s was brought about by the ability to construct recombinant DNA molecules. This has completely revolutionised biology and enabled the development of ‘synthetic biology’, where new gene arrangements can be constructed and evaluated. This has been tremendously successful, leading to a wide range of biotechnological applications. However, the engineering of useful synthetic biological systems is still undertaken on an individual ad hoc basis, which is expensive and inefficient. Synthetic biology as a discipline is now attempting to apply the principles of engineering and develop foundation technologies that make the design and construction of engineered biological systems easier, facilitating future development in biotechnology. This course will explore the challenges, problems and approaches to engineering biological systems. 

 

Role

Lecturer