Imperial College London

Jeff Eaton

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Senior Lecturer in HIV Epidemiology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

jeffrey.eaton

 
 
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Location

 

Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Gregson:2016:10.1080/13548506.2016.1140903,
author = {Gregson, S and Fenton, R and Nyamukapa, C and Robertson, L and Mushati, P and Thomas, R and Eaton, J},
doi = {10.1080/13548506.2016.1140903},
journal = {Psychology, Health & Medicine},
pages = {909--917},
title = {Wealth Differentials in the Impact of Conditional and Unconditional Cash Transfers on Education: Findings from a Community-Randomised Controlled Trial in Zimbabwe},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13548506.2016.1140903},
volume = {21},
year = {2016}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - We investigated (1) how household wealth affected the relationshipbetween conditional cash transfers (CCT) and unconditional cashtransfers (UCT) and school attendance, (2) whether CCT and UCTaffected educational outcomes (repeating a year of school), (3) ifbaseline school attendance and transfer conditions affected howmuch of the transfers participants spent on education and (4) if CCTor UCT reduced child labour in recipient households. Data wereanalysed from a cluster-randomized controlled trial of CCT and UCTin 4043 households from 2009 to 2010. Recipient households received$18 dollars per month plus $4 per child. CCT were conditioned onabove 80% school attendance, a full vaccination record and a birthcertificate. In the poorest quintile, the odds ratio of above 80% schoolattendance at follow-up for those with below 80% school attendanceat baseline was 1.06 (p = .67) for UCT vs. CCT. UCT recipients reportedspending slightly more (46.1% (45.4–46.7)) of the transfer on schoolexpenses than did CCT recipients (44.8% (44.1–45.5)). Amongstthose with baseline school attendance of below 80%, there was nostatistically significant difference between CCT and UCT participantsin the proportion of the transfer spent on school expenses (p = .63).Amongst those with above 80% baseline school attendance, CCTparticipants spent 3.5% less (p = .001) on school expenses than UCTparticipants. UCT participants were no less likely than those in thecontrol group to repeat a grade of school. CCT participants had .69(.60–.79) lower odds vs. control of repeating the previous schoolgrade. Children in CCT recipient households spent an average of .31fewer hours in paid work than those in the control group (p < .001)and children in the UCT arm spent an average of .15 fewer hours inpaid work each week than those in the control arm (p = .06).
AU - Gregson,S
AU - Fenton,R
AU - Nyamukapa,C
AU - Robertson,L
AU - Mushati,P
AU - Thomas,R
AU - Eaton,J
DO - 10.1080/13548506.2016.1140903
EP - 917
PY - 2016///
SN - 1354-8506
SP - 909
TI - Wealth Differentials in the Impact of Conditional and Unconditional Cash Transfers on Education: Findings from a Community-Randomised Controlled Trial in Zimbabwe
T2 - Psychology, Health & Medicine
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13548506.2016.1140903
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/29383
VL - 21
ER -