Imperial College London

Professor Joshua B. Edel

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Chemistry

Professor of Biosensing & Analytical Sciences
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 0754joshua.edel Website

 
 
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Assistant

 

Mr John Murrell +44 (0)20 7594 2845

 
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Location

 

442AChemistrySouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Peveler:2018:10.1021/acsami.7b13273,
author = {Peveler, WJ and Noimark, S and Al-Azawi, H and Hwang, GB and Crick, CR and Allan, E and Edel, JB and Ivanov, AP and MacRobert, AJ and Parkin, IP},
doi = {10.1021/acsami.7b13273},
journal = {ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces},
pages = {98--104},
title = {Covalently attached antimicrobial surfaces using BODIPY: improving efficiency and effectiveness},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.7b13273},
volume = {10},
year = {2018}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - The development of photoactivated antimicrobial surfaces that kill pathogens through the production of singlet oxygen has proved very effective in recent years, with applications in medical devices and hospital touch surfaces, to improve patient safety and well being. However, many of these surfaces require a swell-encapsulation-shrink strategy to incorporate the photoactive agents in a polymer matrix, and this is resource intensive, given that only the surface fraction of the agent is active against bacteria. Furthermore, there is a risk that the agent will leach from the polymer and thus raises issues of biocompatibility and patient safety. Here, we describe a more efficient method of fabricating a silicone material with a covalently attached monolayer of photoactivating agent that uses heavy-atom triplet sensitization for improved singlet oxygen generation and corresponding antimicrobial activity. We use boron-dipyrromethane with a reactive end group and incorporated Br atoms, covalently attached to poly(dimethylsiloxane). We demonstrate the efficacy of this material in producing singlet oxygen and killing Staphylococcus aureus and suggest how it might be easily modifiable for future antimicrobial surface development.
AU - Peveler,WJ
AU - Noimark,S
AU - Al-Azawi,H
AU - Hwang,GB
AU - Crick,CR
AU - Allan,E
AU - Edel,JB
AU - Ivanov,AP
AU - MacRobert,AJ
AU - Parkin,IP
DO - 10.1021/acsami.7b13273
EP - 104
PY - 2018///
SN - 1944-8244
SP - 98
TI - Covalently attached antimicrobial surfaces using BODIPY: improving efficiency and effectiveness
T2 - ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acsami.7b13273
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/63991
VL - 10
ER -