Imperial College London

Dr Julie McDonald

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences

Lecturer (MRC-CMBI)
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5247julie.mcdonald Website

 
 
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Location

 

1.44Flowers buildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

80 results found

Monaghan TM, Duggal NA, Rosati E, Griffin R, Hughes J, Roach B, Yang DY, Wang C, Wong K, Saxinger L, Pučić-Baković M, Vučković F, Klicek F, Lauc G, Tighe P, Mullish BH, Miguens Blanco J, McDonald JAK, Marchesi JR, Xue N, Dottorini T, Acharjee A, Franke A, Wong GK-S, Polytarchou C, Yau TO, Christodoulou N, Hatziapostoulou M, Wang M, Russell LA, Kao DHet al., 2021, A Multi-Factorial Observational Study on Sequential Fecal Microbiota Transplant in Patients with Medically Refractory Clostridioides difficile Infection, Cells, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2073-4409

Journal article

Pruski P, Dos Santos Correia G, Lewis H, Capuccini K, Inglese P, Chan D, Brown R, Kindinger L, Lee Y, Smith A, Marchesi J, McDonald J, Cameron S, Alexander-Hardiman K, David A, Stock S, Norman J, Terzidou V, Teoh TG, Sykes L, Bennett P, Takats Z, MacIntyre Det al., 2021, Direct on-swab metabolic profiling of vaginal microbiome host interactions during pregnancy and preterm birth, Nature Communications, Vol: 12, ISSN: 2041-1723

The pregnancy vaginal microbiome contributes to risk of preterm birth, the primary cause of death in children under 5 years of age. Here we describe direct on-swab metabolic profiling by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS) for sample preparation-free characterisation of the cervicovaginal metabolome in two independent pregnancy cohorts (VMET, n = 160; 455 swabs; VMET II, n = 205; 573 swabs). By integrating metataxonomics and immune profiling data from matched samples, we show that specific metabolome signatures can be used to robustly predict simultaneously both the composition of the vaginal microbiome and host inflammatory status. In these patients, vaginal microbiota instability and innate immune activation, as predicted using DESI-MS, associated with preterm birth, including in women receiving cervical cerclage for preterm birth prevention. These findings highlight direct on-swab metabolic profiling by DESI-MS as an innovative approach for preterm birth risk stratification through rapid assessment of vaginal microbiota-host dynamics.

Journal article

Allegretti JR, Kelly CR, Grinspan A, Mullish BH, Hurtado J, Carrellas M, Marcus J, Marchesi JR, McDonald JAK, Gerardin Y, Silverstein M, Pechlivanis A, Barker GF, Miguens Blanco J, Alexander JL, Gallagher KI, Pettee W, Phelps E, Nemes S, Sagi SV, Bohm M, Kassam Z, Fischer Met al., 2021, Inflammatory bowel disease outcomes following fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent C. difficile infection, Inflammatory Bowel Diseases, Vol: 27, Pages: 1371-1378, ISSN: 1078-0998

BackgroundRecurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a clinical challenge. Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has emerged as a recurrent CDI therapy. Anecdotal concerns exist regarding worsening of IBD activity; however, prospective data among IBD patients are limited.MethodsSecondary analysis from an open-label, prospective, multicenter cohort study among IBD patients with 2 or more CDI episodes was performed. Participants underwent a single FMT by colonoscopy (250 mL, healthy universal donor). Secondary IBD-related outcomes included rate of de novo IBD flares, worsening IBD, and IBD improvement—all based on Mayo or Harvey-Bradshaw index (HBI) scores. Stool samples were collected for microbiome and targeted metabolomic profiling.ResultsFifty patients enrolled in the study, among which 15 had Crohn’s disease (mean HBI, 5.8 ± 3.4) and 35 had ulcerative colitis (mean partial Mayo score, 4.2 ± 2.1). Overall, 49 patients received treatment. Among the Crohn’s disease cohort, 73.3% (11 of 15) had IBD improvement, and 4 (26.6%) had no disease activity change. Among the ulcerative colitis cohort, 62% (22 of 34) had IBD improvement, 29.4% (11 of 34) had no change, and 4% (1 of 34) experienced a de novo flare. Alpha diversity significantly increased post-FMT, and ulcerative colitis patients became more similar to the donor than Crohn’s disease patients (P = 0.04).ConclusionThis prospective trial assessing FMT in IBD-CDI patients suggests IBD outcomes are better than reported in retrospective studies.

Journal article

Innes AJ, Mullish BH, Ghani R, Szydlo RM, Apperley JF, Olavarria E, Palanicawandar R, Kanfer EJ, Milojkovic D, McDonald JAK, Brannigan ET, Thursz MR, Williams HRT, Davies FJ, Marchesi JR, Pavlu Jet al., 2021, Fecal microbiota transplant mitigates adverse outcomes in patients colonized with multidrug-resistant organisms undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-8, ISSN: 2235-2988

The gut microbiome can be adversely affected by chemotherapy and antibiotics prior to hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT).This affects graft success and increases susceptibility to multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO) colonization and infection. Weperformed an initial retrospective analysis of our use of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy donors as therapy forMDRO-colonized patients with hematological malignancy. FMT was performed on eight MDRO-colonized patients pre-HCT (FMT-MDROgroup), and outcomes compared with 11 MDRO colonized HCT patients from the same period. At 12 months, survival wassignificantly higher in the FMT-MDRO group (70% versus 36% p = 0.044). Post-HCT, fewer FMT-MDRO patients required intensivecare (0% versus 46%, P = 0.045) or experienced fever (0.29 versus 0.11 days, P = 0.027). Intestinal MDRO decolonization occurred in25% of FMT-MDRO patients versus 11% non-FMT MDRO patients. Despite the significant difference and statistically comparablepatient/transplant characteristics, as the sample size was small, a matched-pair analysis to non-MDRO colonized control cohorts(2:1 matching) was performed. At 12 months, the MDRO group who did not have an FMT had significantly lower survival (36.4%versus 61.9% respectively, p=0.012), and higher non relapse mortality (NRM; 60.2% versus 16.7% respectively, p=0.009) than theirpaired non-colonized cohort. There was no difference in survival (70% versus 43.4%, p=0.14) or NRM (12.5% versus 31.2%respectively, p=0.24) between the FMT-MDRO group and their paired cohort. Negative outcomes, including mortality associatedwith MDRO colonization, may be ameliorated by pre-HCT FMT, despite lack of intestinal decolonization. Further work is needed toexplore the observed benefit.

Journal article

Monaghan TM, Biswas RN, Nashine RR, Joshi SS, Mullish BH, Seekatz AM, Miguens Blanco J, McDonald JAK, Marchesi JR, Yau TO, Christodoulou N, Hatziapostolou M, Pučić-Baković M, Vučković F, Klicek F, Lauc G, Xue N, Dottorini T, Ambalkar S, Satav A, Polytarchou C, Acharjee A, Kashyap RSet al., 2021, Multiomics profiling reveals signatures of dysmetabolism in urban populations in central India, Microorganisms, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-21, ISSN: 2076-2607

Background: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have become a major cause of morbidity and mortality in India. Perturbation of host–microbiome interactions may be a key mechanism by which lifestyle-related risk factors such as tobacco use, alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity may influence metabolic health. There is an urgent need to identify relevant dysmetabolic traits for predicting risk of metabolic disorders, such as diabetes, among susceptible Asian Indians where NCDs are a growing epidemic. Methods: Here, we report the first in-depth phenotypic study in which we prospectively enrolled 218 adults from urban and rural areas of Central India and used multiomic profiling to identify relationships between microbial taxa and circulating biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk. Assays included fecal microbiota analysis by 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing, quantification of serum short chain fatty acids by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and multiplex assaying of serum diabetic proteins, cytokines, chemokines, and multi-isotype antibodies. Sera was also analysed for N-glycans and immunoglobulin G Fc N-glycopeptides. Results: Multiple hallmarks of dysmetabolism were identified in urbanites and young overweight adults, the majority of whom did not have a known diagnosis of diabetes. Association analyses revealed several host–microbe and metabolic associations. Conclusions: Host–microbe and metabolic interactions are differentially shaped by body weight and geographic status in Central Indians. Further exploration of these links may help create a molecular-level map for estimating risk of developing metabolic disorders and designing early interventions.

Journal article

Mullish BH, Ghani R, McDonald JAK, Davies F, Marchesi JRet al., 2021, Reply to Woodworth, et al, Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol: 72, Pages: e924-e925, ISSN: 1058-4838

Journal article

Miguens Blanco J, Liu Z, Mullish BH, Danckert NP, Alexander JL, Chrysostomou D, Sengupta R, McHugh N, McDonald JAK, Abraham SM, Marchesi JRet al., 2021, A Phenomic Characterization of the Gut Microbiota - Associations with Psoriatic Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis, World Microbe Forum

Conference paper

Ghani R, Mullish BH, McDonald JAK, Ghazy A, Williams HRT, Brannigan ET, Mookerjee S, Satta G, Gilchrist M, Duncan N, Corbett R, Innes AJ, Pavlu J, Thursz MR, Davies F, Marchesi JRet al., 2021, Disease prevention not decolonization – a model for fecal microbiota transplantation in patients colonized with multidrug-resistant organisms, Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol: 72, Pages: 1444-1447, ISSN: 1058-4838

Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) yields variable intestinal decolonization results for multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). This study showed significant reductions in antibiotic duration, bacteremia and length of stay in 20 patients colonized/ infected with MDRO receiving FMT (compared to pre-FMT history, and a matched group not receiving FMT), despite modest decolonization rates.

Journal article

Mullish BH, Marchesi JR, McDonald JAK, Pass DA, Masetti G, Michael DR, Plummer S, Jack AA, Davies TS, Hughes TR, Wang Det al., 2021, Probiotics reduce self-reported symptoms of upper respiratory tract infection in overweight and obese adults: should we be considering probiotics during viral pandemics?, Gut Microbes, Vol: 13, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 1949-0976

Gut microbiome manipulation to alter the gut-lung axis may potentially protect humans against respiratory infections, and clinical trials of probiotics show promise in this regard in healthy adults and children. However, comparable studies are lacking in overweight/obese people, who have increased risks in particular of viral upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). This Addendum further analyses our recent placebo-controlled trial of probiotics in overweight/obese people (focused initially on weight loss) to investigate the impact of probiotics upon the occurrence of URTI symptoms. As well as undergoing loss of weight and improvement in certain metabolic parameters, study participants taking probiotics experienced a 27% reduction in URTI symptoms versus control, with those ≥45 years or BMI ≥30 kg/m2 experiencing greater reductions. This symptom reduction is apparent within 2 weeks of probiotic use. Gut microbiome diversity remained stable throughout the study in probiotic-treated participants. Our data provide support for further trials to assess the potential role of probiotics in preventing viral URTI (and possibly also COVID-19), particularly in overweight/obese people.

Journal article

Ghani R, Mullish B, Innes A, Szydlo RM, Apperley JF, Olavarria E, Palanicawandar R, Kanfer E, Milojkovic D, McDonald JAK, Brannigan E, Thursz MR, Williams HRT, Davies FJ, Pavlu J, Marchesi Jet al., 2021, Faecal microbiota transplant (FMT) prior to allogeneic haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in patients colonised with multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) results in improved survival, ECCMID

Conference paper

Mullish BH, Michael DR, McDonald JAK, Masetti G, Plummer SF, Marchesi JRet al., 2020, Identifying the factors influencing outcome in probiotic studies in overweight and obese patients – host or microbiome?, Gut, Vol: 70, Pages: 225-226, ISSN: 0017-5749

Journal article

Liu Z, Coales I, Penney N, McDonald J, Phetcharaburanin J, Seyfried F, Li Jet al., 2020, A subset of Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass bacterial consortium colonizes the gut of non-surgical rats without inducing host-microbial metabolic changes, mSystems, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2379-5077

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) is an effective weight loss surgery, resulting in a characteristic increase of fecal Gammaproteobacteria. The contribution of this compositional change to metabolic benefits of RYGB is currently debatable. Therefore, this study employed 16S rRNA gene sequencing and metabolic profiling to monitor the dynamic colonization of the RYGB microbial consortium and their metabolic impact on the host. Eleven Wistar rats received vancomycin and enrofloxacin, followed by fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) of cecal slurry obtained from either RYGB- or sham-operated rats. Urine and feces from the microbiota recipients (RYGB microbiota recipients [RYGBr], n = 6; sham microbiota recipients [SHAMr], n = 5) were collected pre- and post-antibiotics and 1, 3, 6, 9, and 16 days post-FMT. No significant differences in body weight and food intake were observed between RYGBr and SHAMr. While neither group reached the community richness of that of their donors, by day 6, both groups reached the richness and diversity of that prior to antibiotic treatment. However, the typical signature of RYGB microbiome—increased Enterobacteriaceae—was not replicated in these recipients after two consecutive FMT, suggesting that the environmental changes induced by the anatomical rearrangements of RYGB could be key for sustaining such a consortium. The transplanted bacteria did not induce the same metabolic signature of urine and feces as those previously reported in RYGB-operated rats. Future work is required to explore environmental factors that shape the RYGB microbiota in order to further investigate the metabolic functions of the RYGB microbiota, thereby teasing out the mechanisms of the RYGB surgery.IMPORTANCE Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery results in a long-term gut bacterial shift toward Gammaproteobacteria in both patients and rodents. The contribution of this compositional shift, or the RYGB bacterial cons

Journal article

Miguens Blanco J, Selvarajah U, Liu Z, Mullish BH, Alexander J, McDonald J, Abraham S, Marchesi Jet al., 2020, Identification of New Associations Between Psoriatic Arthritis and the Gut Microbiota. the Mi-PART, a Phenomic Study, ACR Convergence 2020, Publisher: Wiley, ISSN: 2326-5205

Conference paper

Allegretti JR, Kelly CR, Grinspan A, Mullish BH, Kassam Z, Fischer Met al., 2020, Outcomes of fecal microbiota transplantation in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases and recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection, Gastroenterology, Vol: 159, Pages: 1982-1984, ISSN: 0016-5085

There has been an increase in the burden of Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI),1 especially in high-risk populations such as patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).2 The prevalence of CDI in the IBD population is up to 8-fold higher than comparable controls, with increased rates of recurrence and CDI-associated mortality.3 In addition, CDI may induce an IBD flare, and worsen disease severity and clinical course.4Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is a guideline recommended therapy for recurrent CDI5; however, supportive randomized trials excluded patients with IBD. In retrospective trials of patients with IBD, FMT failure rates had been reported to be approximately 25% to 30%.6 In addition, Khoruts and colleagues reported that patients with IBD and CDI were more likely to fail FMT,7 leading to further uncertainty regarding the safety and efficacy of FMT in IBD patients with concurrent CDI. Accordingly, we conducted the first prospective study examining the efficacy of FMT among patients with IBD and CDI.MethodsWe conducted an open-label, prospective, single-arm, multicenter cohort study at 4 tertiary care FMT referral centers (Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Indiana University, Brown University, and Mount Sinai Hospital; NCT03106844). Patients with a confirmed diagnosis of IBD and 2 or more confirmed CDI episodes within 12 months, including the most recent episode occurring within 3 months, were enrolled. In keeping with CDI clinical guidelines,5 polymerase chain reaction or glutamate dehydrogenase with toxin enzyme immunoassay were permitted for the qualifying CDI episode. Patients with a total or subtotal colectomy, isolated ileal or small bowel Crohn’s disease, those pregnant or breastfeeding, those treated with vancomycin or metronidazole for more than 60 days, or those who had undergone a prior FMT within 12 months were excluded. Baseline IBD and CDI data were collected. All patients underwent a single FMT via colonoscopy. Four robus

Journal article

Shenker NS, Perdones-Montero A, Burke A, Stickland S, McDonald JAK, Alexander-Hardiman K, Flanagan J, Takats Z, Cameron SJSet al., 2020, Metabolomic and Metataxonomic Fingerprinting of Human Milk Suggests Compositional Stability over a Natural Term of Breastfeeding to 24 Months, NUTRIENTS, Vol: 12

Journal article

Petropoulou K, Salt LJ, Edwards CH, Warren FJ, Garcia-Perez I, Chambers ES, Alshaalan R, Khatib M, Perez-Moral N, Cross KL, Kellingray L, Stanley R, Koev T, Khimyak YZ, Narbad A, Penney N, Serrano-Contreras JI, Charalambides MN, Miguens Blanco J, Castro Seoane R, McDonald JAK, Marchesi JR, Holmes E, Godsland IF, Morrison DJ, Preston T, Domoney C, Wilde PJ, Frost GSet al., 2020, A natural mutation in Pisum sativum L. (pea) alters starch assembly and improves glucose homeostasis in humans, Nature Food

Journal article

Taylor H, Serrano-Contreras JI, McDonald JAK, Epstein J, Fell JM, Seoane RC, Li JV, Marchesi JR, Hart ALet al., 2020, Multiomic features associated with mucosal healing and inflammation in paediatric Crohn's disease, Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Vol: 52, Pages: 1491-1502, ISSN: 0269-2813

BACKGROUND: The gastrointestinal microbiota has an important role in mucosal immune homoeostasis and may contribute to maintaining mucosal healing in Crohn's disease (CD). AIM: To identify changes in the microbiota, metabolome and protease activity associated with mucosal healing in established paediatric CD. METHODS: Twenty-five participants aged 3-18 years with CD, disease duration of over 6 months, and maintenance treatment with biological therapy were recruited. They were divided into a low calprotectin group (faecal calprotectin <100 μg/g, "mucosal healing," n = 11), and a high calprotectin group (faecal calprotectin >100 μg/g, "mucosal inflammation," n = 11). 16S gene-based metataxonomics, 1 H-NMR spectroscopy-based metabolic profiling and protease activity assays were performed on stool samples. RESULTS: Relative abundance of Dialister species was six times greater in the low calprotectin group (q = 0.00999). Alpha and beta diversity, total protease activity and inferred metagenomic profiles did not differ between groups. Pentanoate (valerate) and lysine were principal discriminators in a machine-learning model which differentiated high and low calprotectin samples using NMR spectra (R2 0.87, Q2 0.41). Mean relative concentration of pentanoate was 1.35-times greater in the low calprotectin group (95% CI 1.03-1.68, P = 0.036) and was positively correlated with Dialister. Mean relative concentration of lysine was 1.54-times greater in the high calprotectin group (95% CI 1.05-2.03, P = 0.028). CONCLUSIONS: This multiomic study identified an increase in Dialister species and pentanoate, and a decrease in lysine, in patients with "mucosal healing." It supports further investigation of these as potential novel therapeutic targets in CD.

Journal article

Martinez-Gili L, McDonald JAK, Liu Z, Kao D, Allegretti JR, Monaghan TM, Barker GF, Miguens Blanco J, Williams HRT, Holmes E, Thursz MR, Marchesi JR, Mullish BHet al., 2020, Understanding the mechanisms of efficacy of fecal microbiota transplant in treating recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection and beyond: the contribution of gut microbial derived metabolites, Gut Microbes, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1949-0976

Fecal microbiota transplant (FMT) is a highly-effective therapy for recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (rCDI), and shows promise for certain non-CDI indications. However, at present, its mechanisms of efficacy have remained poorly understood. Recent studies by our laboratory have noted the particular key importance of restoration of gut microbe-metabolite interactions in the ability of FMT to treat rCDI, including the impact of FMT upon short chain fatty acid (SCFAs) and bile acid metabolism. This includes a significant impact of these metabolites upon the life cycle of C. difficile directly, along with potential postulated additional benefits, including effects upon host immune response. In this Addendum, we first present an overview of these recent advancements in this field, and then describe additional novel data from our laboratory on the impact of FMT for rCDI upon several gut microbial-derived metabolites which had not previously been implicated as being of relevance.

Journal article

Pataia V, McIlvride S, Papacleovoulou G, Ovadia C, McDonald JAK, Wahlstrom A, Jansen E, Adorini L, Shapiro D, Marchesi JR, Marschall H-U, Williamson Cet al., 2020, Obeticholic acid improves fetal bile acid profile in a mouse model of gestational hypercholanemia, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-GASTROINTESTINAL AND LIVER PHYSIOLOGY, Vol: 319, Pages: G197-G211, ISSN: 0193-1857

Journal article

Ding NS, McDonald JAK, Perdones-Montero A, Rees DN, Adegbola SO, Misra R, Hendy P, Penez L, Marchesi JR, Holmes E, Sarafian MH, Hart ALet al., 2020, Metabonomics and the Gut Microbiome Associated With Primary Response to Anti-TNF Therapy in Crohn's Disease, JOURNAL OF CROHNS & COLITIS, Vol: 14, Pages: 1090-1102, ISSN: 1873-9946

Journal article

West K, Kanu C, Maric T, McDonald J, Nicholson J, Li J, Johnson M, Holmes E, Savvidou Met al., 2020, Longitudinal metabolic and gut bacterial profiling of pregnant women with previous bariatric surgery, Gut, Vol: 69, Pages: 1452-1459, ISSN: 0017-5749

Due to the global increase in obesity rates and success of bariatric surgery in weight reduction, an increasing number of women now present pregnant with a previous bariatric procedure. This study investigates the extent of bariatric-associated metabolic and gut microbial alterations during pregnancy and their impact on fetal development.DesignA parallel metabonomic (1H NMR spectroscopy) and gut bacterial (16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing) profiling approach was used to determine maternal longitudinal phenotypes associated with malabsorptive/mixed (n=25) or restrictive (n=16) procedures, compared to women with similar early pregnancy body mass index but without bariatric surgery (n=70). Metabolic profiles of offspring at birth were also analysed.ResultsPrevious malabsorptive, but not restrictive, procedures induced significant changes in maternal metabolic pathways involving branched-chain and aromatic amino acids with decreased circulation of leucine, isoleucine and isobutyrate, increased excretion of microbial-associated metabolites of protein putrefaction (phenylacetlyglutamine, p-cresol sulfate, indoxyl sulfate and p-hydroxyphenylacetate), and a shift in the gut microbiota. Urinary concentration of phenylacetylglutamine was significantly elevated in malabsorptive patients relative to controls (P=0.001) and was also elevated in urine of neonates born from these mothers (P=0.021). Furthermore, the maternal metabolic changes induced by malabsorptive surgery were associated with reduced maternal insulin resistance and fetal/birth weight.ConclusionMetabolism is altered in pregnant women with a previous malabsorptive bariatric surgery. These alterations may be beneficial for maternal outcomes, but the effect of elevated levels of phenolic and indolic compounds on fetal and infant health should be investigated further.

Journal article

Letertre MPM, Munjoma NC, Wolfer K, Pechlivanis A, McDonald J, Hardwick RN, Cherrington NJ, Coen M, Nicholson J, Hoyles L, Swann J, Wilson Iet al., 2020, A two-way interaction between methotrexate and the gut microbiota of male Sprague Dawley rats, Journal of Proteome Research, Vol: 19, Pages: 3326-3339, ISSN: 1535-3893

Methotrexate (MTX) is a chemotherapeutic agent that cancause a range of toxic side effects including gastrointestinal damage,hepatotoxicity, myelosuppression, and nephrotoxicity and has potentiallycomplex interactions with the gut microbiome. Following untargeted UPLCqtof-MS analysis of urine and fecal samples from male Sprague−Dawley ratsadministered at either 0, 10, 40, or 100 mg/kg of MTX, dose-dependentchanges in the endogenous metabolite profiles were detected. Semiquantitativetargeted UPLC-MS detected MTX excreted in urine as well as MTX and twometabolites, 2,4-diamino-N-10-methylpteroic acid (DAMPA) and 7-hydroxyMTX, in the feces. DAMPA is produced by the bacterial enzymecarboxypeptidase glutamate 2 (CPDG2) in the gut. Microbiota profiling(16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing) of fecal samples showed an increase inthe relative abundance of Firmicutes over the Bacteroidetes at low doses ofMTX but the reverse at high doses. Firmicutes relative abundance was positively correlated with DAMPA excretion in feces at 48 h,which were both lower at 100 mg/kg compared to that seen at 40 mg/kg. Overall, chronic exposure to MTX appears to inducecommunity and functionality changes in the intestinal microbiota, inducing downstream perturbations in CPDG2 activity, and thusmay delay MTX detoxication to DAMPA. This reduction in metabolic clearance might be associated with increased gastrointestinaltoxicity.

Journal article

Allegretti JR, Hurtado J, Carrellas M, Marcus J, Nemes S, Marchesi J, Mullish BH, McDonald JA, Phelps EL, Sagi S, Bohm M, Geradin Y, Silverstein M, Kelly CR, Kassam Z, Grinspan A, Fischer Met al., 2020, 121 ULCERATIVE COLITIS PATIENTS ACHEIVE MORE ROBUST ENGRAFTMENT COMPARED TO PATIENTS WITH CROHN'S DISEASE AFTER FECAL MICROBIOTA TRANSPLANTATION FOR THE TREATMENT OF RECURRENT C. DIFFICLE INFECTION, Gastroenterology, Vol: 158, Pages: S-22, ISSN: 0016-5085

Journal article

Martinez-Gili L, McDonald JA, Liu Z, Kao DH, Allegretti JR, Barker GF, Blanco JM, Holmes E, Thursz MR, Marchesi J, Mullish BHet al., 2020, 644 identification of novel changes in microbially-derived metabolites after fecal microbiota transplant for recurrent clostridioides difficile infection, Publisher: Elsevier BV, Pages: S-138-S-139, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Blanco JM, Liu Z, Selvarajah U, Mullish BH, Alexander JL, McDonald JA, Abraham S, Marchesi Jet al., 2020, Sa1923 identification of new associations between psoriatic arthritis and the gut microbiota, a phenomic study, Gastroenterology, Vol: 158, Pages: S-481, ISSN: 0016-5085

Journal article

Ghani R, Mullish BH, McDonald JA, Ghazy A, Williams HR, Brannigan E, Satta G, Gilchrist M, Duncan N, Corbett R, Pavlu J, Innes AJ, Thursz MR, Davies F, Marchesi Jet al., 2020, 1144 FECAL MICROBIOTA TRANSPLANT FOR MULTI-DRUG RESISTANT ORGANISMS: IMPROVED CLINICAL OUTCOMES BEYOND INTESTINAL DECOLONISATION, Publisher: Elsevier BV, ISSN: 0016-5085

Conference paper

Allegretti JR, Kassam Z, Mullish BH, Chiang A, Carrellas M, Hurtado J, Marchesi JR, McDonald JAK, Pechlivanis A, Barker GF, Miguens Blanco J, Garcia Perez I, Wong WF, Gerardin Y, Silverstein M, Kennedy K, Thompson Cet al., 2020, Effects of fecal microbiota transplantation with oral capsules in obese patients, Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol: 18, Pages: 855-863.e2, ISSN: 1542-3565

Background & AimsStudies in mice have shown that the intestinal microbiota can contribute to obesity via the anorexigenic gut hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) and bile acids, which affect lipid metabolism. We performed a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study of the effects of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) in obese, metabolically uncompromised patients.MethodsWe performed a double-blind study of 22 obese patients (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 35kg/m2) without a diagnosis of diabetes, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, or metabolic syndrome. Participants were randomly assigned (1:1) to groups that received FMT by capsules (induction dose of 30 capsules at week 4 and maintenance dose of 12 capsules at week 8) or placebo capsules. FMT capsules were derived from a single, lean donor (BMI, 17.5 kg/m2). Patients were followed through week 26; the primary outcome was safety. Stool and serum samples were collected from patients at baseline and at weeks 1, 4, 6, 8 and 12 after administration of the first dose of FMT or placebo and analyzed by 16S RNA gene sequencing. Stool and serum samples were analyzed for metabolomics by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Additional outcomes were change in area under the curve for GLP1 at week 12.ResultsWe observed no significant differences in adverse events between patients who received FMT vs placebo. There was no increase in the area under the curve of GLP1 in either group. Patients who received FMT had sustained shifts in microbiomes associated with obesity toward those of the donor (P<.001). Patients who received FMT had a sustained decrease in stool levels of taurocholic acid (P<.05), compared with baseline; bile acid profiles began to more closely resemble those of the donor. We did not observe significant changes in mean BMI at week 12 in either group.ConclusionsIn a placebo-controlled pilot study, we found that FMT capsules (derived from a lean donor) were safe but did not reduce BMI in obese metabol

Journal article

Michael DR, Jack AA, Masetti G, Davies TS, Loxley KE, Kerry-Smith J, Plummer JF, Marchesi JR, Mullish BH, McDonald JAK, Hughes TR, Wang D, Garaiova I, Paduchová Z, Muchová J, Good MA, Plummer SFet al., 2020, A randomised controlled study shows supplementation of overweight and obese adults with lactobacilli and bifidobacteria reduces bodyweight and improves well-being, Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2045-2322

In an exploratory, block-randomised, parallel, double-blind, single-centre, placebo-controlled superiority study (ISRCTN12562026, funded by Cultech Ltd), 220 Bulgarian participants (30 to 65 years old) with BMI 25–34.9 kg/m2 received Lab4P probiotic (50 billion/day) or a matched placebo for 6 months. Participants maintained their normal diet and lifestyle. Primary outcomes were changes in body weight, BMI, waist circumference (WC), waist-to-height ratio (WtHR), blood pressure and plasma lipids. Secondary outcomes were changes in plasma C-reactive protein (CRP), the diversity of the faecal microbiota, quality of life (QoL) assessments and the incidence of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). Significant between group decreases in body weight (1.3 kg, p < 0.0001), BMI (0.045 kg/m2, p < 0.0001), WC (0.94 cm, p < 0.0001) and WtHR (0.006, p < 0.0001) were in favour of the probiotic. Stratification identified greater body weight reductions in overweight subjects (1.88%, p < 0.0001) and in females (1.62%, p = 0.0005). Greatest weight losses were among probiotic hypercholesterolaemic participants (−2.5%, p < 0.0001) alongside a significant between group reduction in small dense LDL-cholesterol (0.2 mmol/L, p = 0.0241). Improvements in QoL and the incidence rate ratio of URTI (0.60, p < 0.0001) were recorded for the probiotic group. No adverse events were recorded. Six months supplementation with Lab4P probiotic resulted in significant weight reduction and improved small dense low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (sdLDL-C) profiles, QoL and URTI incidence outcomes in overweight/obese individuals.

Journal article

Ovadia C, Perdones Montero A, Fan HM, Mullish B, McDonald J, Papacleovoulou G, Wahlstrom A, Stahlman M, Tsakmaki A, Clarke L, Sklavounos A, Dixon P, Bewick G, Walters J, Marschall H-U, Marchesi J, Williamson Cet al., 2020, Ursodeoxycholic acid enriches intestinal bile salt hydrolase-expressing Bacteroidetes in cholestatic pregnancy, Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2045-2322

Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) treatment can reduce itch and lower endogenous serum bile acids in intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP). We sought to determine how it could influence the gut environment in ICP to alter enterohepatic signalling.The gut microbiota and bile acid content were determined in faeces from 35 pregnant women (14 with uncomplicated pregnancies and 21 with ICP, 17 receiving UDCA). Faecal bile salt hydrolase activity was measured using a precipitation assay. Serum fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19) and 7α-hydroxy-4-cholesten-3-one (C4) concentrations were measured following a standardised diet for 21 hours. Women with a high ratio of Bacteroidetes to Firmicutes were more likely to be treated with UDCA (Fisher’s exact test p=0.0178) than those with a lower ratio. Bile salt hydrolase activity was reduced in women with low Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes. Women taking UDCA had higher faecal lithocholic acid (p<0.0001), with more unconjugated bile acids than women with untreated ICP or uncomplicated pregnancy. UDCA-treatment increased serum FGF19, and reduced C4 (reflecting lower bile acid synthesis). During ICP, UDCA treatment can be associated with enrichment of the gut microbiota with Bacteroidetes. These demonstrate high bile salt hydrolase activity, which deconjugates bile acids enabling secondary modification to FXR agonists, enhancing enterohepatic feedback via FGF19.

Journal article

Ghani R, Mullish BH, McDonald J, Ghazy A, Williams H, Satta G, Eimear B, Gilchrist M, Duncan N, Corbett R, Pavlu J, Innes A, Thursz M, Marchesi J, Davies Fet al., 2020, Disease prevention not decolonisation: a cohort study for faecal microbiota transplantation for patients colonised with multidrug-resistant organisms, ECCMID 2020

Conference paper

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