Imperial College London

DrMartinBidartondo

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Reader in Molecular Ecology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 8332 5332m.bidartondo Website

 
 
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Location

 

Jodrell Gate, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, TW9 3DS

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

59 results found

Field KJ, Rimington WR, Bidartondo MI, Allinson KE, Beerling DJ, Cameron DD, Duckett JG, Leake JR, Pressel Set al., 2016, Functional analysis of liverworts in dual symbiosis with Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina fungi under a simulated Palaeozoic CO2 decline, ISME JOURNAL, Vol: 10, Pages: 1514-1526, ISSN: 1751-7362

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gomes SI, Aguirre-Gutiérrez J, Bidartondo MI, Merckx VSet al., 2016, Arbuscular mycorrhizal interactions of mycoheterotrophic Thismia are more specialized than in autotrophic plants., New Phytol

In general, plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi exchange photosynthetically fixed carbon for soil nutrients, but occasionally nonphotosynthetic plants obtain carbon from AM fungi. The interactions of these mycoheterotrophic plants with AM fungi are suggested to be more specialized than those of green plants, although direct comparisons are lacking. We investigated the mycorrhizal interactions of both green and mycoheterotrophic plants. We used next-generation DNA sequencing to compare the AM communities from roots of five closely related mycoheterotrophic species of Thismia (Thismiaceae), roots of surrounding green plants, and soil, sampled over the entire temperate distribution of Thismia in Australia and New Zealand. We observed that the fungal communities of mycoheterotrophic and green plants are phylogenetically more similar within than between these groups of plants, suggesting a specific association pattern according to plant trophic mode. Moreover, mycoheterotrophic plants follow a more restricted association with their fungal partners in terms of phylogenetic diversity when compared with green plants, targeting more clustered lineages of fungi, independent of geographic origin. Our findings demonstrate that these mycoheterotrophic plants target more narrow lineages of fungi than green plants, despite the larger fungal pool available in the soil, and thus they are more specialized towards mycorrhizal fungi than autotrophic plants.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Kowal J, Pressel S, Duckett JG, Bidartondo MIet al., 2016, Liverworts to the rescue: an investigation of their efficacy as mycorrhizal inoculum for vascular plants, FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY, Vol: 30, Pages: 1014-1023, ISSN: 0269-8463

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Spake R, van der Linde S, Newton AC, Suz LM, Bidartondo MI, Doncaster CPet al., 2016, Similar biodiversity of ectomycorrhizal fungi in set-aside plantations and ancient old-growth broadleaved forests, BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION, Vol: 194, Pages: 71-79, ISSN: 0006-3207

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Desiro A, Faccio A, Kaech A, Bidartondo MI, Bonfante Pet al., 2015, Endogone, one of the oldest plant-associated fungi, host unique Mollicutes-related endobacteria, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 205, Pages: 1464-1472, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Field KJ, Leake JR, Tille S, Allinson KE, Rimington WR, Bidartondo MI, Beerling DJ, Cameron DDet al., 2015, From mycoheterotrophy to mutualism: mycorrhizal specificity and functioning in Ophioglossum vulgatum sporophytes, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 205, Pages: 1492-1502, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Field KJ, Pressel S, Duckett JG, Rimington WR, Bidartondo MIet al., 2015, Symbiotic options for the conquest of land, TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 30, Pages: 477-486, ISSN: 0169-5347

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hynson NA, Bidartondo MI, Read DJ, 2015, Are there geographic mosaics of mycorrhizal specificity and partial mycoheterotrophy? A case study in Moneses uniflora (Ericaceae)., New Phytol, Vol: 208, Pages: 1003-1007

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Liebel HT, Bidartondo MI, Gebauer G, 2015, Are carbon and nitrogen exchange between fungi and the orchid Goodyera repens affected by irradiance?, ANNALS OF BOTANY, Vol: 115, Pages: 251-261, ISSN: 0305-7364

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Rimington WR, Pressel S, Duckett JG, Bidartondo MIet al., 2015, Fungal associations of basal vascular plants: reopening a closed book?, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 205, Pages: 1394-1398, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Suz LM, Barsoum N, Benham S, Cheffings C, Cox F, Hackett L, Jones AG, Mueller GM, Orme D, Seidling W, Van der Linde S, Bidartondo MIet al., 2015, Monitoring ectomycorrhizal fungi at large scales for science, forest management, fungal conservation and environmental policy, ANNALS OF FOREST SCIENCE, Vol: 72, Pages: 877-885, ISSN: 1286-4560

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Yokoya K, Zettler LW, Kendon JP, Bidartondo MI, Stice AL, Skarha S, Corey LL, Knight AC, Sarasan Vet al., 2015, Preliminary findings on identification of mycorrhizal fungi from diverse orchids in the Central Highlands of Madagascar, MYCORRHIZA, Vol: 25, Pages: 611-625, ISSN: 0940-6360

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bateman RM, Rudall PJ, Bidartondo MI, Cozzolino S, Tranchida-Lombardo V, Carine MA, Moura Met al., 2014, Speciation via floral heterochrony and presumed mycorrhizal host switching of endemic butterfly orchids on the Azorean archipelago., American Journal of Botany, Vol: 101, Pages: 979-1001, ISSN: 1537-2197

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Field KJ, Rimington WR, Bidartondo MI, Allinson KE, Beerling DJ, Cameron DD, Duckett JG, Leake JR, Pressel Set al., 2014, First evidence of mutualism between ancient plant lineages (Haplomitriopsida liverworts) and Mucoromycotina fungi and its response to simulated Palaeozoic changes in atmospheric CO2, New Phytologist, ISSN: 1469-8137

The discovery that Mucoromycotina, an ancient and partially saprotrophic fungal lineage, associates with the basal liverwort lineage Haplomitriopsida casts doubt on the widely held view that Glomeromycota formed the sole ancestral plant-fungus symbiosis. Whether this association is mutualistic, and how its functioning was affected by the fall in atmospheric CO2 concentration that followed plant terrestrialization in the Palaeozoic, remains unknown. We measured carbon-for-nutrient exchanges between Haplomitriopsida liverworts and Mucoromycotina fungi under simulated mid-Palaeozoic (1500 ppm) and near-contemporary (440 ppm) CO2 concentrations using isotope tracers, and analysed cytological differences in plant-fungal interactions. Concomitantly, we cultured both partners axenically, resynthesized the associations in vitro, and characterized their cytology. We demonstrate that liverwort-Mucoromycotina symbiosis is mutualistic and mycorrhiza-like, but differs from liverwort-Glomeromycota symbiosis in maintaining functional efficiency of carbon-for-nutrient exchange between partners across CO2 concentrations. Inoculation of axenic plants with Mucoromycotina caused major cytological changes affecting the anatomy of plant tissues, similar to that observed in wild-collected plants colonized by Mucoromycotina fungi. By demonstrating reciprocal exchange of carbon for nutrients between partners, our results provide support for Mucoromycotina establishing the earliest mutualistic symbiosis with land plants. As symbiotic functional efficiency was not compromised by reduced CO2 , we suggest that other factors led to the modern predominance of the Glomeromycota symbiosis.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Schoch CL, Robbertse B, Robert V, Duong V, Cardinali G, Irinyi L, Meyer W, Nilsson RH, Hughes K, Miller AN, Kirk PM, Abarenkov K, Aime MC, Ariyawansa HA, Bidartondo M, Boekhout T, Buyck B, Cai Q, Chen J, Crespo A, Crous PW, Damm U, De Beer ZW, Dentinger BTM, Divakar PK, Duenas M, Feau N, Fliegerova K, Garcia MA, Ge Z-W, Griffith G, Groenewald JZ, Groenewald M, Grube M, Gryzenhout M, Gueidan C, Guo L, Hambleton S, Hamelin R, Hansen K, Hofstetter V, Hong S-B, Houbraken J, Hyde KD, Inderbitzin P, Johnston PR, Karunarathna SC, Koljalg U, Kovacs GM, Kraichak E, Krizsan K, Kurtzman CP, Larsson K-H, Leavitt S, Letcher PM, Liimatainen K, Liu J-K, Lodge DJ, Luangsa-ard JJ, Lumbsch HT, Maharachchikumbura SSN, Manamgoda D, Martin MP, Minnis AM, Moncalvo J-M, Mule G, Nakasone KK, Niskanen T, Olariaga I, Papp T, Petkovits T, Pino-Bodas R, Powell MJ, Raja HA, Redecker D, Sarmiento-Ramirez JM, Seifert KA, Shrestha B, Stenroos S, Stielow B, Suh S-O, Tanaka K, Tedersoo L, Teresa Telleria M, Udayanga D, Untereiner WA, Dieguez Uribeondo J, Subbarao KV, Vagvoelgyi C, Visagie C, Voigt K, Walker DM, Weir BS, Weiss M, Wijayawardene NN, Wingfield MJ, Xu JP, Yang ZL, Zhang N, Zhuang W-Y, Federhen Set al., 2014, Finding needles in haystacks: linking scientific names, reference specimens and molecular data for Fungi, Database, Vol: 2014, ISSN: 0162-4105

DNA phylogenetic comparisons have shown that morphology-based species recognition often underestimates fungal diversity. Therefore, the need for accurate DNA sequence data, tied to both correct taxonomic names and clearly annotated specimen data, has never been greater. Furthermore, the growing number of molecular ecology and microbiome projects using high-throughput sequencing require fast and effective methods for en masse species assignments. In this article, we focus on selecting and re-annotating a set of marker reference sequences that represent each currently accepted order of Fungi. The particular focus is on sequences from the internal transcribed spacer region in the nuclear ribosomal cistron, derived from type specimens and/or ex-type cultures. Re-annotated and verified sequences were deposited in a curated public database at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), namely the RefSeq Targeted Loci (RTL) database, and will be visible during routine sequence similarity searches with NR_prefixed accession numbers. A set of standards and protocols is proposed to improve the data quality of new sequences, and we suggest how type and other reference sequences can be used to improve identification of Fungi.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Stoeckel M, Tesitelova T, Jersakova J, Bidartondo MI, Gebauer Get al., 2014, Carbon and nitrogen gain during the growth of orchid seedlings in nature, New Phytologist, Vol: 202, Pages: 606-615, ISSN: 1469-8137

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Suz LM, Barsoum N, Benham S, Dietrich HP, Fetzer KD, Fischer R, García P, Gehrman J, Kristöfel F, Manninger M, Neagu S, Nicolas M, Oldenburger J, Raspe S, Sánchez G, Schröck HW, Schubert A, Verheyen K, Verstraeten A, Bidartondo MIet al., 2014, Environmental drivers of ectomycorrhizal communities in Europe's temperate oak forests, Molecular Ecology, ISSN: 1365-294X

Ectomycorrhizal fungi are major ecological players in temperate forests but they are rarely used in measures of forest condition because large-scale, high-resolution, standardized and replicated belowground data is scarce. We carried out an analysis of ectomycorrhizas at 22 intensively-monitored long-term oak plots, across nine European countries, covering complex natural and anthropogenic environmental gradients. We found that at large scales mycorrhizal richness and evenness declined with decreasing soil pH and root density, and with increasing atmospheric nitrogen deposition. Shifts in mycorrhizas with different functional traits were detected; mycorrhizas with structures specialized for long-distance transport related differently to most environmental variables than those without. The dominant oak-specialist Lactarius quietus, with limited soil exploration, responds positively to increasing N inputs and decreasing pH. In contrast, Tricholoma, Cortinarius and Piloderma species, with medium-distance soil exploration, show a consistently negative response. We also determined N critical loads for moderate (9.5 - 13.5 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) ) and drastic (17 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1) ) changes in belowground mycorrhizal root communities in temperate oak forests. Overall, we generated the first baseline data for ectomycorrhizal fungi in the oak forests sampled, identified nitrogen pollution as one of their major drivers at large scales, and revealed fungi that individually and/or in combination with others can be used as belowground indicators of environmental characteristics. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Desiro A, Duckett JG, Pressel S, Villarreal JC, Bidartondo MIet al., 2013, Fungal symbioses in hornworts: a chequered history, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol: 280, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Waterman RJ, Klooster MR, Hentrich H, Bidartondo MIet al., 2013, Species interactions of mycoheterotrophic plants: specialization and its potential consequences., Mycoheterotrophy, Editors: Merckx, New York, Publisher: Springer, Pages: 267-296, ISBN: 978-1-4614-5209-6

BOOK CHAPTER

Corcoran P, Jacobson DJ, Bidartondo MI, Hickey PC, Kerekes JF, Taylor JW, Johannesson Het al., 2012, Quantifying functional heterothallism in the pseudohomothallic ascomycete Neurospora tetrasperma, FUNGAL BIOLOGY, Vol: 116, Pages: 962-975, ISSN: 1878-6146

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Field KJ, Cameron DD, Leake JR, Tille S, Bidartondo MI, Beerling DJet al., 2012, Contrasting arbuscular mycorrhizal responses of vascular and non-vascular plants to a simulated Palaeozoic CO2 decline, NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, Vol: 3, ISSN: 2041-1723

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Sommer J, Pausch J, Brundrett MC, Dixon KW, Bidartondo MI, Gebauer Get al., 2012, Limited carbon and mineral nutrient gain from mycorrhizal fungi by adult Australian orchids., American Journal of Botany

• Premise of the study: In addition to autotrophic and fully mycoheterotrophic representatives, the orchid family comprises species that at maturity obtain C and N partially from fungal sources. These partial mycoheterotrophs are often associated with fungi that simultaneously form ectomycorrhizas with trees. This study investigates mycorrhizal nutrition for orchids from the southwestern Australian biodiversity hotspot.• Methods: The mycorrhizal fungi of 35 green and one achlorophyllous orchid species were analyzed using molecular methods. Nutritional mode was identified for 27 species by C and N isotope abundance analysis in comparison to non-orchids from the same habitat. As a complementary approach, (13)CO(2) pulse labeling was applied to a subset of six orchid species to measure photosynthetic capacity.• Key results: Almost all orchids associated with rhizoctonia-forming fungi. Due to much higher than expected variation within the co-occurring nonorchid reference plants, the stable isotope approach proved challenging for assigning most orchids to a specialized nutritional mode; therefore, these orchids were classified as autotrophic at maturity. The (13)CO(2) pulse labeling confirmed full autotrophy for six selected species. Nonetheless, at least three orchid species (Gastrodia lacista, Prasophyllum elatum, Corybas recurvus) were identified as nutritionally distinctive from autotrophic orchids and reference plants.• Conclusions: Despite the orchid-rich flora in southwestern Australia, partial mycoheterotrophy among these orchids is less common than in other parts of the world, most likely because most associate with saprotrophic fungi rather than ectomycorrhizal fungi.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bidartondo MI, Read DJ, Trappe JM, Merckx V, Ligrone R, Duckett JGet al., 2011, The dawn of symbiosis between plants and fungi, BIOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 7, Pages: 574-577, ISSN: 1744-9561

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hardwick KA, Fiedler P, Lee LC, Pavlik B, Hobbs RJ, Aronson J, Bidartondo M, Black E, Coates D, Daws MI, Dixon K, Elliott S, Ewing K, Gann G, Gibbons D, Gratzfeld J, Hamilton M, Hardman D, Harris J, Holmes PM, Jones M, Mabberley D, Mackenzie A, Magdalena C, Marrs R, Milliken W, Mills A, Lughadha EN, Ramsay M, Smith P, Taylor N, Trivedi C, Way M, Whaley O, Hopper SDet al., 2011, The Role of Botanic Gardens in the Science and Practice of Ecological Restoration, CONSERVATION BIOLOGY, Vol: 25, Pages: 265-275, ISSN: 0888-8892

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pennington HG, Bidartondo MI, Barsoum N, 2011, A few exotic mycorrhizal fungi dominate eucalypts planted in England, FUNGAL ECOLOGY, Vol: 4, Pages: 299-302, ISSN: 1754-5048

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Tse-Laurence MA, Bidartondo M, 2011, Mapping fungi from below ground: online genetic resources and ectomycorrhizal geographic distributions, IFOREST-BIOGEOSCIENCES AND FORESTRY, Vol: 4, Pages: 252-255, ISSN: 1971-7458

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Waterman RJ, Bidartondo MI, Stofberg J, Combs JK, Gebauer G, Savolainen V, Barraclough TG, Pauw Aet al., 2011, The Effects of Above- and Belowground Mutualisms on Orchid Speciation and Coexistence, AMERICAN NATURALIST, Vol: 177, Pages: E54-E68, ISSN: 0003-0147

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Arnold AE, Lamit LJ, Gehring CA, Bidartondo MI, Callahan Het al., 2010, Interwoven branches of the plant and fungal trees of life, NEW PHYTOLOGIST, Vol: 185, Pages: 874-878, ISSN: 0028-646X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bidartondo MI, Duckett JG, 2010, Conservative ecological and evolutionary patterns in liverwort-fungal symbioses, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 277, Pages: 485-492, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cox F, Barsoum N, Bidartondo MI, Borja I, Lilleskov E, Nilsson LO, Rautio P, Tubby K, Vesterdal Let al., 2010, A leap forward in geographic scale for forest ectomycorrhizal fungi, ANNALS OF FOREST SCIENCE, Vol: 67, ISSN: 1286-4560

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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