Imperial College London

ProfessorMichaelCrawford

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Medicine

Professor of Mental Health Research
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3313 4161m.crawford

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Nicole Hickey +44 (0)20 3313 4161

 
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Location

 

7N11bCommonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

223 results found

Aalbers S, Fusar-Poli L, Freeman RE, Spreen M, Ket JCF, Vink AC, Maratos A, Crawford M, Chen X-J, Gold Cet al., 2017, Music therapy for depression, COCHRANE DATABASE OF SYSTEMATIC REVIEWS, ISSN: 1469-493X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Andreas S, Schulz H, Volkert J, Dehoust M, Sehner S, Suling A, Ausín B, Canuto A, Crawford M, Da Ronch C, Grassi L, Hershkovitz Y, Muñoz M, Quirk A, Rotenstein O, Santos-Olmo AB, Shalev A, Strehle J, Weber K, Wegscheider K, Wittchen H-U, Härter Met al., 2017, Prevalence of mental disorders in elderly people: the European MentDis_ICF65+ study., Br J Psychiatry, Vol: 210, Pages: 125-131

BACKGROUND: Except for dementia and depression, little is known about common mental disorders in elderly people. AIMS: To estimate current, 12-month and lifetime prevalence rates of mental disorders in different European and associated countries using a standardised diagnostic interview adapted to measure the cognitive needs of elderly people. METHOD: The MentDis_ICF65+ study is based on an age-stratified, random sample of 3142 older men and women (65-84 years) living in selected catchment community areas of participating countries. RESULTS: One in two individuals had experienced a mental disorder in their lifetime, one in three within the past year and nearly one in four currently had a mental disorder. The most prevalent disorders were anxiety disorders, followed by affective and substance-related disorders. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with previous studies we found substantially higher prevalence rates for most mental disorders. These findings underscore the need for improving diagnostic assessments adapted to the cognitive capacity of elderly people. There is a need to raise awareness of psychosocial problems in elderly people and to deliver high-quality mental health services to these individuals.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barnes T, Leeson V, Paton C, Osborn D, Killaspy H, Craig T, Lewis S, Keown P, Ismail S, Crawford M, Baldwin D, Lewis G, Geddes J, Kumar M, Pathak R, Taylor Set al., 2017, LONG-TERM ANTIDEPRESSANT TREATMENT FOR NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS IN SCHIZOPHRENIA: THE ACTIONS STUDY, 16th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research (ICOSR), Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, Pages: S214-S215, ISSN: 0586-7614

CONFERENCE PAPER

Bieleninik L, Geretsegger M, Mossler K, Assmus J, Thompson G, Gattino G, Elefant C, Gottfried T, Igliozzi R, Muratori F, Suvini F, Kim J, Crawford MJ, Odell-Miller H, Oldfield A, Casey O, Finnemann J, Carpente J, Park A-L, Grossi E, Gold Cet al., 2017, Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy vs Enhanced Standard Care on Symptom Severity Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder The TIME-A Randomized Clinical Trial, JAMA-JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, Vol: 318, Pages: 525-535, ISSN: 0098-7484

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bowden-Jones O, Whitelock C, Abdulrahim D, Hemmings S, Margetts A, Crawford Met al., 2017, Prevalence of HIV risk-related drug use and sexual activity among men who have sex with men attending a specialist UK club drug clinic, DRUGS AND ALCOHOL TODAY, Vol: 17, Pages: 50-59, ISSN: 1745-9265

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Canuto A, Weber K, Baertschi M, Andreas S, Volkert J, Dehoust MC, Sehner S, Suling A, Wegscheider K, Ausín B, Crawford MJ, Da Ronch C, Grassi L, Hershkovitz Y, Muñoz M, Quirk A, Rotenstein O, Santos-Olmo AB, Shalev A, Strehle J, Wittchen HU, Schulz H, Härter Met al., 2017, Anxiety Disorders in Old Age: Psychiatric Comorbidities, Quality of Life, and Prevalence According to Age, Gender, and Country, American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN: 1064-7481

© 2017 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Objectives: Previous estimates of the prevalence of anxiety disorders in late life vary greatly due to the lack of reliable diagnostic tools. This MentDis_ICF65+ study assessed 12-month prevalence rates of anxiety disorders and age- and gender-related differences in comorbidities, as well as impact on quality of life. Design: The study used a cross-sectional multicenter survey. Participants: The study sample comprised 3,142 men and women aged 65 to 84 years, living in five European countries and Israel. Measurements: Anxiety disorders were assessed using computer-assisted face-to-face interviews with an age-appropriate diagnostic interview (CIDI65+). Results: The prevalence of anxiety disorders was 17.2%. Agoraphobia was the most frequent disorder (4.9%), followed by panic disorder (3.8%), animal phobia (3.5%), general anxiety disorder (3.1%), post-traumatic stress disorder (1.4%), social phobia (1.3%), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (0.8%). The prevalence rate of any anxiety disorder dropped by 40% to 47% in adults aged 75-84 years compared with those aged 65-74 years. Women were twice as likely to present with agoraphobia or general anxiety disorder as men. Only panic disorder and phobia were associated with comorbid major depression. The negative relationship with quality of life was limited to agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder. Conclusions: The age-appropriate CIDI65+ led to higher prevalence rates of anxiety disorders in the elderly, yet to weaker associations with comorbidities and impaired quality of life compared with previous studies.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Crawford MJ, Gold C, Odell-Miller H, Thana L, Faber S, Assmus J, Bieleninik L, Geretsegger M, Grant C, Maratos A, Sandford S, Claringbold A, McConachie H, Maskey M, Mossler KA, Ramchandani P, Hassiotis Aet al., 2017, International multicentre randomised controlled trial of improvisational music therapy for children with autism spectrum disorder: TIME-A study, HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT, Vol: 21, Pages: 1-+, ISSN: 1366-5278

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Crawford MJ, Zoha M, MacDonald A, Kingdon Det al., 2017, Improving the quality of mental health services using patient outcome data: Making the most of HoNOS, Psychiatrist, Vol: 41, Pages: 172-176, ISSN: 1758-3209

©2017 The Authors. Efforts to assess and improve the quality of mental health services are often hampered by a lack of information on patient outcomes. Most mental health services in England have been routinely collecting Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) data for some time. In this article we illustrate how clinical teams have used HoNOS data to identify areas where performance could be improved. HoNOS data have the potential to give clinical teams the information they need to assess the quality of care they deliver, as well as develop and test initiatives aimed at improving the services they provide.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

D'Lima D, Crawford MJ, Darzi A, Archer Set al., 2017, Patient safety and quality of care in mental health: a world of its own?, BJPSYCH BULLETIN, Vol: 41, Pages: 241-243, ISSN: 2056-4694

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Day C, Briskman J, Crawford MJ, Harris L, McCrone P, McMurran M, Moran P, Morgan L, Scott S, Stahl D, Ramchandani P, Weaver Tet al., 2017, Feasibility trial of a psychoeducational intervention for parents with personality difficulties: The Helping Families Programme, CONTEMPORARY CLINICAL TRIALS COMMUNICATIONS, Vol: 8, Pages: 67-74, ISSN: 2451-8654

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dehoust MC, Schulz H, Härter M, Volkert J, Sehner S, Drabik A, Wegscheider K, Canuto A, Weber K, Crawford M, Quirk A, Grassi L, DaRonch C, Munoz M, Ausin B, Santos-Olmo A, Shalev A, Rotenstein O, Hershkowitz Y, Strehle J, Wittchen H-U, Andreas Set al., 2017, Prevalence and correlates of somatoform disorders in the elderly: Results of a European study., Int J Methods Psychiatr Res, Vol: 26

Somatoform disorders have rarely been addressed in epidemiological and health care services studies of the elderly. The few existing studies vary considerably in their methodologies limiting comparability of findings. Data come from the MentDis_ICF65+ study, in which a total of 3142 community-dwelling respondents aged 65-84 years from six different countries were assessed by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview adapted to the needs of the elderly (CIDI65+). The 12-month prevalence rate for any somatoform disorders was found to be 3.8, whereby the prevalence for somatization disorder according to DSM-IV was 0%, the prevalence for abridged somatization was 1.7% and the rate for 12-months somatoform pain disorder was 2.6%. We found a significant variation by study centre (p < 0.005). There was a significant gender difference for pain disorder, but not for abridged somatization. Significant age-related effects revealed for both disorder groups. Somatoform disorders were found to be associated with other mental disorders [odds ratio (OR) anxiety =4.8, OR affective disorders 3.6], as well as with several impairments and disabilities. Somatoform disorders are prevalent, highly impairing conditions in older adults, which are often associated with other mental disorders and should receive more research and clinical attention.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Drummond C, Gilburt H, Burns T, Copello A, Crawford M, Day E, Deluca P, Godfrey C, Parrott S, Rose A, Sinclair J, Coulton Set al., 2017, Assertive Community Treatment For People With Alcohol Dependence: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial, ALCOHOL AND ALCOHOLISM, Vol: 52, Pages: 234-241, ISSN: 0735-0414

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lambe T, Frew E, Ives NJ, Woolley RL, Cummins C, Brettell EA, Barsoum EN, Webb NJA, James-Ellison M, Williams HM, Bala P, Jones C, Holt R, Morgan H, Bailey E, Flanagan L, Bhatti T, Bahl S, Walding L, Gouta E, Gupta R, Kerrin D, Parikh A, Duthie A, Gadong N, Anjum B, Crone B, de Jesus H, Lancoma-Malcolm I, Plaatjies N, Khalifa K, McKeever K, McCall G, McCreesh P, Millar M, Hesseling M, Kubwalo M, Bolger A, Hobson L, Milford D, Kerecuk L, Norton C, Rahania N, Williamson H, Bibi F, Gazeley T, Williams J, Watson F, Abbot C, Frazer S, Akeroyd L, Ahmed M, Muogbo D, Backhouse C, Boswell S, Crosbie E, Heinz P, Ulbrich B, Hegde S, Jones P, Webb NJA, Lennon R, Lewis M, Plant N, Shenoy M, Sukthankar S, Bryant C, Douglas S, Sumner H, Howell J, Elhadi N, Bishton I, Ayonrinde O, Turner A, Campbell J, Turner A, Gibbs J, Newby E, Saladi S, Timmis A, Burchett C, de-Beger S, Nair A, Banerjee A, Fenton T, D Costa S, Bowker R, Smith C, Natarajan VU, Wong LM, Parslow P, Kandala V, Imran S, Chandrasekaran S, Ho SA, Losa I, Marinaki K, Keenan N, Nichols J, Shippey Jet al., 2017, Mapping the Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™) Generic Core Scales onto the Child Health Utility Index–9 Dimension (CHU-9D) Score for Economic Evaluation in Children, PharmacoEconomics, Pages: 1-15, ISSN: 1170-7690

© 2017 Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature Background: The Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL™) questionnaire is a widely used, generic instrument designed for measuring health-related quality of life (HRQoL); however, it is not preference-based and therefore not suitable for cost–utility analysis. The Child Health Utility Index–9 Dimension (CHU-9D), however, is a preference-based instrument that has been primarily developed to support cost–utility analysis. Objective: This paper presents a method for estimating CHU-9D index scores from responses to the PedsQL™ using data from a randomised controlled trial of prednisolone therapy for treatment of childhood corticosteroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome. Methods: HRQoL data were collected from children at randomisation, week 16, and months 12, 18, 24, 36 and 48. Observations on children aged 5 years and older were pooled across all data collection timepoints and were then randomised into an estimation (n = 279) and validation (n = 284) sample. A number of models were developed using the estimation data before internal validation. The best model was chosen using multi-stage selection criteria. Results: Most of the models developed accurately predicted the CHU-9D mean index score. The best performing model was a generalised linear model (mean absolute error = 0.0408; mean square error = 0.0035). The proportion of index scores deviating from the observed scores by < 0.03 was 53%. Conclusions: The mapping algorithm provides an empirical tool for estimating CHU-9D index scores and for conducting cost–utility analyses within clinical studies that have only collected PedsQL™ data. It is valid for children aged 5 years or older. Caution should be exercised when using this with children younger than 5 years, older adolescents ( > 13 years) or patient groups with particularly poor quality of life. ISRCTN Registry No: 16645249

JOURNAL ARTICLE

McMurran M, Day F, Reilly J, Delport J, McCrone P, Whitham D, Tan W, Duggan C, Montgomery AA, Williams HC, Adams CE, Jin H, Moran P, Crawford MJet al., 2017, Psychoeducation and Problem Solving (PEPS) Therapy for Adults With Personality Disorder: A Pragmatic Randomized-Controlled Trial., J Pers Disord, Vol: 31, Pages: 810-826

We compared psychoeducation and problem solving (PEPS) therapy against usual treatment in a multisite randomized-controlled trial. The primary outcome was social functioning. We aimed to recruit 444 community-dwelling adults with personality disorder; however, safety concerns led to an early cessation of recruitment. A total of 154 people were randomized to PEPS and 152 to usual treatment. Follow-up at 72 weeks was completed for 68%. PEPS therapy was no more effective than usual treatment for improving social functioning (adjusted difference in mean Social Functioning Questionnaire scores = -0.73; 95% CI [-1.83, 0.38]; p = 0.19). PEPS therapy is not an effective treatment for improving social functioning of adults with personality disorder living in the community.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Munjiza J, Britvic D, Radman M, Crawford MJet al., 2017, Severe war-related trauma and personality pathology: a case-control study, BMC PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 17, ISSN: 1471-244X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Olajide K, Munjiza J, Moran P, O'Connell L, Newton-Howes G, Bassett P, Gbolagade A, Ng N, Tyrer P, Mulder R, Crawford MJet al., 2017, Development and Psychometric Properties of the Standardized Assessment of Severity of Personality Disorder (SASPD)., J Pers Disord, Pages: 1-13

Personality disorder (PD) is increasingly categorized according to its severity, but there is no simple way to screen for severity according to ICD-11 criteria. We set out to develop the Standardized Assessment of Severity of Personality Disorder (SASPD). A total of 110 patients completed the SASPD together with a clinical assessment of the severity of personality disorder. We examined the predictive ability of the SASPD using the area under the ROC curve (AUC). Two to four weeks later, 43 patients repeated the SASPD to examine reliability. The SASPD had good predictive ability for determining mild (AUC = 0.86) and moderate (AUC = 0.84) PD at cut points of 8 and 10, respectively. Test-retest reliability of the SASPD was high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.93, 95% CI [0.88, 0.96]). The SASPD thus provides a simple, brief, and reliable indicator of the presence of mild or moderate PD according to ICD-11 criteria.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pearce S, Scott L, Attwood G, Saunders K, Dean M, De Ridder R, Galea D, Konstantinidou H, Crawford Met al., 2017, Democratic therapeutic community treatment for personality disorder: randomised controlled trial, BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 210, Pages: 149-156, ISSN: 0007-1250

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Perry BI, Champaneri N, Griffiths F, Paul M, Islam Z, Rugkasa J, Burns T, Tyrer P, Crawford M, Deb S, Singh SPet al., 2017, Exploring professionals' understanding, interpretation and implementation of the 'appropriate medical treatment test' in the 2007 amendment of the Mental Health Act 1983, BJPSYCH OPEN, Vol: 3, Pages: 57-+, ISSN: 2056-4724

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Singh SP, Paul M, Parsons H, Burns T, Tyrer P, Fazel S, Deb S, Islam Z, Rugkasa J, Gajwani R, Thana L, Crawford MJet al., 2017, A prospective, quantitative study of mental health act assessments in England following the 2007 amendments to the 1983 act: did the changes fulfill their promise?, BMC PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 17, ISSN: 1471-244X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Tyrer P, Salkovskis P, Tyrer H, Wang D, Crawford MJ, Dupont S, Cooper S, Green J, Murphy D, Smith G, Bhogal S, Nourmand S, Lazarevic V, Loebenberg G, Evered R, Kings S, McNulty A, Lisseman-Stones Y, McAllister S, Kramo K, Nagar J, Reid S, Sanatinia R, Whittamore K, Walker G, Philip A, Warwick H, Byford S, Barrett Bet al., 2017, Cognitive-behaviour therapy for health anxiety in medical patients (CHAMP): a randomised controlled trial with outcomes to 5 years, HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT, Vol: 21, Pages: 1-+, ISSN: 1366-5278

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Tyrer P, Tyrer H, Morriss R, Crawford M, Cooper S, Yang M, Guo B, Mulder RT, Kemp S, Barrett Bet al., 2017, Clinical and cost-effectiveness of adapted cognitive behaviour therapy for non-cardiac chest pain: a multicentre, randomised controlled trial., Open Heart, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2053-3624

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the cost-effectiveness of a modified form of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for recurrent non-cardiac chest pain. METHODS: We tested the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a modified form of CBT for chest pain (CBT-CP)(4-10 sessions) in patients who attended cardiology clinics or emergency medical services repeatedly. Patients were randomised using a remote web-based system to CBT-CP or to standard care in the clinic. Assessments were made at baseline and at 6 months and 12 months. The primary outcome was the change in the Health Anxiety Inventory Score at 6 months. Other clinical measures, social functioning, quality of life and costs of services were also recorded. RESULTS: Sixty-eight patients were randomised with low attrition rates at 6 months and 12 months with 81% of all possible assessments completed at 6 months and 12 months. Although there were no significant group differences between any of the outcome measures at either 6 months or 12 months, patients receiving CBT-CP had between two and three times fewer hospital bed days, outpatient appointments, and A&E attendances than those allocated to standard care and total costs per patient were £1496.49 lower, though the differences in costs were not significant. There was a small non-significant gain in quality adjusted life years in those allocated to CBT-CP compared with standard care (0.76 vs 0.74). CONCLUSIONS: It is concluded that CBT-CP in the context of current hospital structures is not a viable treatment, but is worthy of further research as a potentially cost-effective treatment for non-cardiac chest pain. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ISRCTN 14711101.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Volkert J, Andreas S, Härter M, Dehoust MC, Sehner S, Suling A, Ausín B, Canuto A, Crawford MJ, Da Ronch C, Grassi L, Hershkovitz Y, Muñoz M, Quirk A, Rotenstein O, Santos-Olmo AB, Shalev AY, Strehle J, Weber K, Wegscheider K, Wittchen HU, Schulz Het al., 2017, Predisposing, enabling, and need factors of service utilization in the elderly with mental health problems, International Psychogeriatrics, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 1041-6102

Copyright © International Psychogeriatric Association 2017 Background:: Empirical data on the use of services due to mental health problems in older adults in Europe is lacking. The objective of this study is to identify factors associated with service utilization in the elderly. Methods:: As part of the MentDis_ICF65+ study, N = 3,142 people aged 65–84 living in the community in six European and associated countries were interviewed. Based on Andersen's behavioral model predisposing, enabling, and need factors were analyzed with logistic regression analyses. Results:: Overall, 7% of elderly and 11% of those with a mental disorder had used a service due to mental health problems in the last 12 months. Factors significantly associated with underuse were male sex, lower education, living in the London catchment area, higher functional impairment and more comorbid mental disorders. The most frequently reported barrier to service use was personal beliefs, e.g. “I can deal with my problem on my own” (90%). Conclusion:: Underutilization of mental health services among older people in the European community is common and interventions are needed to achieve an adequate use of services.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Volkert J, Härter M, Dehoust MC, Schulz H, Sehner S, Suling A, Wegscheider K, Ausín B, Canuto A, Crawford MJ, Da Ronch C, Grassi L, Hershkovitz Y, Muñoz M, Quirk A, Rotenstein O, Santos-Olmo AB, Shalev AY, Strehle J, Weber K, Wittchen HU, Andreas Set al., 2017, Study approach and field work procedures of the MentDis_ICF65+ project on the prevalence of mental disorders in the older adult European population, BMC Psychiatry, Vol: 17

© 2017 The Author(s). Background: This study describes the study approach and field procedures of the MentDis_ICF65+ study, which aims to assess the prevalence of mental disorders in older adults. Methods: An age-appropriate version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI65+) was developed and tested with regard to its feasibility and psychometric properties in a pre-test and pilot phase. In the cross-sectional survey an age-stratified, random sample of older adults (65-84 years) living in selected catchment areas of five European countries and Israel was recruited. Results: N = 3142 participants (mean age 73.7 years, 50.7% female) took part in face-to-face interviews. The mean response rate was 20% and varied significantly between centres, age and gender groups. Sociodemographic differences between the study centres appeared for the place of birth, number of grandchildren, close significants, retirement and self-rated financial situation. The comparison of the MentDis_ICF65+ sample with the catchment area and country population of the study centres revealed significant differences, although most of these were numerically small. Conclusions: The study will generate new information on the prevalence of common mental disorders among older adults across Europe using an age-appropriate, standardized diagnostic instrument and a harmonized approach to sampling. Generalizability of the findings and a potentially limited representativeness are discussed.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Aimola L, Jasim S, Tripathi N, Holder S, Quirk A, Crawford MJet al., 2016, Quality of low secure services in the UK: development and use of the Quality of Environment In Low Secure Services (QELS) checklist, JOURNAL OF FORENSIC PSYCHIATRY & PSYCHOLOGY, Vol: 27, Pages: 504-516, ISSN: 1478-9949

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Aimola L, Jasim S, Tripathi N, Tucker S, Worrall A, Quirk A, Crawford MJet al., 2016, Impact of peer-led quality improvement networks on quality of inpatient mental health care: study protocol for a cluster randomized controlled trial, BMC PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1471-244X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barnes TRE, Leeson VC, Paton C, Costelloe C, Simon J, Kiss N, Osborn D, Killaspy H, Craig TKJ, Lewis S, Keown P, Ismail S, Crawford M, Baldwin D, Lewis G, Geddes J, Kumar M, Pathak R, Taylor Set al., 2016, Antidepressant Controlled Trial For Negative Symptoms In Schizophrenia (ACTIONS): a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised clinical trial, HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT, Vol: 20, Pages: 1-+, ISSN: 1366-5278

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Crawford MJ, Barnicot K, Patterson S, Gold Cet al., 2016, Negative results in phase III trials of complex interventions: cause for concern or just good science?, BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 209, Pages: 6-8, ISSN: 0007-1250

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Crawford MJ, Thana L, 2016, Authors' reply., Br J Psychiatry, Vol: 209

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Crawford MJ, Thana L, 2016, Cognitive-behavioural toxicity? Reflections from Westminster Reply, BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 209, Pages: 262-262, ISSN: 0007-1250

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Crawford MJ, Thana L, Farquharson L, Palmer L, Hancock E, Bassett P, Clarke J, Parry GDet al., 2016, Patient experience of negative effects of psychological treatment: results of a national survey, BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 208, Pages: 260-265, ISSN: 0007-1250

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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