Imperial College London

ProfessorMatthewJackson

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Earth Science & Engineering

TOTAL Chair in Geological Fluid Mechanics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6538m.d.jackson

 
 
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Location

 

1.34Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Solano:2014:10.2475/05.2014.01,
author = {Solano, JMS and Jackson, MD and Sparks, RSJ and Blundy, J},
doi = {10.2475/05.2014.01},
journal = {American Journal of Science},
pages = {895--939},
title = {Evolution of major and trace element composition during melt migration through crystalline mush: Implications for chemical differentiation in the crust},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.2475/05.2014.01},
volume = {314},
year = {2014}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - We present the first quantitative model of heat, mass and both majorand trace element transport in a mush undergoing compaction that accounts forcomponent transport and chemical reaction during melt migration and which isapplicable to crustal systems. The model describes the phase behavior of binarysystems (both eutectic and solid solution), with melt and solid compositions determinedfrom phase diagrams using the local temperature and bulk composition. Traceelement concentration is also determined. The results demonstrate that componenttransport and chemical reaction generate compositional variation in both major andtrace elements that is not captured by existing geochemical models. In particular, wefind that, even for the simplest case of a homogenous, insulated column that isinstantaneously melted then allowed to compact, component transport and reactionleads to spatial variations in major element composition that, in this case, producesmelt that is more enriched in incompatible elements than predicted by batch melting.In deep crustal hot zones (DCHZ), created by the repeated intrusion of hot, mantlederivedmagmas, buoyant melt migrating upwards accumulates in high porosity layers,but has a composition corresponding to only a small fraction of batch melting, becauseit has locally equilibrated with mush at low temperature; moreover, melt migration andchemical reaction in a layered protolith may lead to the rapid formation of highporosity melt layers at the interface between different rock compositions. In both ofthese cases, the melt in the high porosity layer(s) is less enriched in incompatible traceelements than predicted if it is assumed that melt with the same major elementcomposition was produced by batch melting. This distinctive decoupling of major andtrace element fractionation may be characteristic of magmas that originate in DCHZ.Application of the model to a number of crustal systems, including the Ivrea-Verbanozone, the Rum layered intrusion, and the Hol
AU - Solano,JMS
AU - Jackson,MD
AU - Sparks,RSJ
AU - Blundy,J
DO - 10.2475/05.2014.01
EP - 939
PY - 2014///
SN - 0002-9599
SP - 895
TI - Evolution of major and trace element composition during melt migration through crystalline mush: Implications for chemical differentiation in the crust
T2 - American Journal of Science
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.2475/05.2014.01
VL - 314
ER -