Imperial College London

Professor Mark Wilson

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Professor of Practice
 
 
 
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Contact

 

m.wilson

 
 
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Location

 

Cambridge WingSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Summary

PhD MB BChir FRCS (SN) FIMC FRGS MRCA

I am a Consultant Neurosurgeon and Pre-Hospital Care Specialist working at both Imperial College (mainly St Mary's Major Trauma Centre) and as an Air Ambulance doctor.

I am a Clinical Professor specialising in Brain Injury at Imperial and Honorary Professor of Pre-Hospital Care (the Gibson Chair) at the Faculty of Pre-Hospital Care, Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh.

My specialist areas are acute brain injury (mostly traumatic brain injury) and its very early management. I am co-director of the Imperial Neurotrauma Centre.

I am co-founder of GoodSAM, a revolutionary platform that alerts doctors, nurses, paramedic and those trained in basic life support to emergencies around them.

I have worked extensively overseas (India, Nepal, South Africa, as a GP in Australia, Researcher for NASA and as an expedition doctor on Arctic and Everest expeditions). I wrote The Medics Guide to Work and Electives Around the World.

My research is mainly into the brain in trauma and in hypoxia (using it as an injury model) in humans. 

 

Selected Publications

Journal Articles

Wilson MH, Hinds J, Grier G, et al., 2016, Impact brain apnoea - A forgotten cause of cardiovascular collapse in trauma, Resuscitation, Vol:105, ISSN:0300-9572, Pages:52-58

Wilson MH, Habig K, Wright C, et al., 2015, Pre-hospital emergency medicine, The Lancet, Vol:386, ISSN:0140-6736, Pages:2526-2534

Wilson MH, 2016, Monro-Kellie 2.0: The dynamic vascular and venous pathophysiological components of intracranial pressure, Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism, Vol:36, ISSN:0271-678X, Pages:1338-1350

Marcus HJ, Wilson MH, 2015, VIDEOS IN CLINICAL MEDICINE. Insertion of an Intracranial-Pressure Monitor., N Engl J Med, Vol:373

Wilson MH, Edsell MEG, Davagnanam I, et al., 2011, Cerebral artery dilatation maintains cerebral oxygenation at extreme altitude and in acute hypoxia—an ultrasound and MRI study, Journal of Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism, Vol:31, Pages:2019-2029

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