Imperial College London

ProfessorNicholasGrassly

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Prof of Infectious Disease & Vaccine Epidemiology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3264n.grassly Website

 
 
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Location

 

G36Medical SchoolSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Summary

Nicholas Grassly is a Professor in the Department for Infectious Disease Epidemiology. He is interested in the individual immune response to vaccination and how this translates to impact at the population level. His research group conduct both laboratory and population studies, including clinical trials with collaborators in the UK and India. A strength of his group is the development and use of rigorous statistical methods and mathematical models to analyse study data. His group is the WHO collaborating institute on polio data analysis and modelling.

He studied biology at Oxford University, trained in epidemiology at Imperial College London and learnt mathematics with the Open University. He was a Royal Society URF (2004-2011) and then Professor at Imperial College London (2011-present). He has served on various boards and committees, including the MRC Infections and Immunity Board (2012-16) and the WHO SAGE polio group (2008-present). He teaches on the MSc (Epidemiology), MPH and undergraduate biomedical courses at Imperial College London. His work is funded by the MRC, Wellcome Trust, Royal Society and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Current research interests: Infant intestinal microbiome and immune response; Causes of oral vaccine failure (rotavirus and poliovirus); Epidemiology of polio eradication and endgame strategy; Deep sequencing of sewage for poliovirus surveillance; Epidemiology and evolution of enteroviruses; Phylodynamic methods; Typhoid epidemiology in India


Publications

Journals

Parker EPK, Ramani S, Lopman BA, et al., Causes of impaired oral vaccine efficacy in developing countries, Future Microbiology, ISSN:1746-0913

John J, Giri S, Karthikeyan AS, et al., 2017, The Duration of Intestinal Immunity After an Inactivated Poliovirus Vaccine Booster Dose in Children Immunized With Oral Vaccine: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol:215, ISSN:0022-1899, Pages:529-536

Lazarus RP, John J, Shanmugasundaram E, et al., 2017, The effect of probiotics and zinc supplementation on the immune response to oral rotavirus vaccine: A randomized, factorial design, placebo-controlled study among Indian infants, Vaccine, ISSN:0264-410X

Molodecky NA, Blake IM, O'Reilly KM, et al., 2017, Risk factors and short-term projections for serotype-1 poliomyelitis incidence in Pakistan: A spatiotemporal analysis, Plos Medicine, Vol:14, ISSN:1549-1676

O'Reilly KM, Lamoureux C, Molodecky NA, et al., 2017, An assessment of the geographical risks of wild and vaccine-derived poliomyelitis outbreaks in Africa and Asia, Bmc Infectious Diseases, Vol:17, ISSN:1471-2334

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