Imperial College London

ProfessorNeenaModi

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Medicine

Professor of Neonatal Medicine
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3315 5102n.modi

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Surbhi Shah +44 (0)20 3315 5101

 
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Location

 

G4.2 ()Chelsea and Westminster HospitalChelsea and Westminster Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

252 results found

Jenkins HJ, Hyde MJ, Modi N, Marchesi Jet al., 2019, An Investigation of 16S rRNA Gene Analysis Platforms for Processing Samples Acquired from Preterm Neonates., 66th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society-for-Reproductive-Investigation (SRI), Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC, Pages: 121A-121A, ISSN: 1933-7191

CONFERENCE PAPER

Seaton SE, Barker L, Draper ES, Abrams KR, Modi N, Manktelow BN, UK Neonatal Collaborativeet al., 2019, Estimating neonatal length of stay for babies born very preterm., Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed, Vol: 104, Pages: F182-F186

OBJECTIVE: To predict length of stay in neonatal care for all admissions of very preterm singleton babies. SETTING: All neonatal units in England. PATIENTS: Singleton babies born at 24-31 weeks gestational age from 2011 to 2014. Data were extracted from the National Neonatal Research Database. METHODS: Competing risks methods were used to investigate the competing outcomes of death in neonatal care or discharge from the neonatal unit. The occurrence of one event prevents the other from occurring. This approach can be used to estimate the percentage of babies alive, or who have been discharged, over time. RESULTS: A total of 20 571 very preterm babies were included. In the competing risks model, gestational age was adjusted for as a time-varying covariate, allowing the difference between weeks of gestational age to vary over time. The predicted percentage of death or discharge from the neonatal unit were estimated and presented graphically by week of gestational age. From these percentages, estimates of length of stay are provided as the number of days following birth and corrected gestational age at discharge. CONCLUSIONS: These results can be used in the counselling of parents about length of stay and the risk of mortality.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Battersby C, Modi N, 2019, Challenges in Advancing Necrotizing Enterocolitis Research., Clin Perinatol, Vol: 46, Pages: 19-27

Progressing necrotizing enterocolitis research is difficult because the disease is variable in presentation, there are difficulties in making a precise diagnosis, a reliable agreed case-definition is currently lacking, and there is a paucity of preclinical research to identify etiologic targets. The major challenges of the cost of clinical trials and need for long-term outcome ascertainment could be eased through incorporation of novel randomization approaches and data collection into routine care, and collaboration between public-sector and industry funders.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Seaton SE, Draper ES, Abrams KR, Modi N, Manktelow BN, UK Neonatal Collaborativeet al., 2019, Can we estimate the length of stay of very preterm multiples?, Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Molloy EJ, Mader S, Modi N, Gale Cet al., 2019, Parent, child and public involvement in child health research: core value not just an optional extra, PEDIATRIC RESEARCH, Vol: 85, Pages: 2-3, ISSN: 0031-3998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Modi N, Ashby D, Battersby C, Brocklehurst P, Chivers Z, Costeloe K, Draper E, Foster V, Kemp J, Majeed A, Murray J, Petrou S, Rogers K, Santhakumaran S, Saxena S, Statnikov Y, Wong H, Young Aet al., Using routinely recorded clinical data for research: the Medicines for Neonates research programme, Programme Grants for Applied Research, ISSN: 2050-4322

Background: Clinical data offer potential to advance patient care. Neonatal specialised care is a high cost NHS service received by approximately 80,000 newborn infants each year. Objectives: To 1) develop the use of routinely recorded operational clinical data from Electronic Patient Records (EPR), secure national coverage, evaluate and improve the quality of clinical data, and develop their use as a national resource to improve neonatal healthcare and outcomes; test the hypotheses that 2) clinical and research data are of comparable quality; 3) routine NHS clinical assessment at age two-years reliably identifies children with neurodevelopmental impairment; and 4) trial-based economic evaluations of neonatal interventions can be reliably conducted using clinical data; 5) test methods to link NHS datasets; 6) evaluate parent views of personal data in research Design: Six interrelated work-streams; quarterly extractions of predefined data from neonatal EPR; approvals from the National Research Ethics Service, Health Research Authority Confidentiality Advisory Group, Caldicott Guardians and lead neonatal clinicians of participating NHS Trusts Setting: NHS neonatal unitsParticipants: Neonatal clinical teams; parents of babies admitted to NHS neonatal unitsInterventions: In work-stream 3 we employed the Bayley-III scales to evaluate neurodevelopmental status and the Quantitative Checklist of Autism in Toddlers (Q-CHAT) to evaluate social-communication skills. In work-stream 6 we recruited parents with previous experience of a child in neonatal care to assist in the design of a questionnaire directed at the parents of infants admitted to neonatal units. Data sources: Data extracted from the EPR of admissions to NHS neonatal units Main outcomes and results: We created a National Neonatal Research Database (NNRD) containing a defined extract from real-time, point-of-care, clinician-entered EPR from all NHS neonatal units in England, Wales and Scotland (n=200), establish

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Shah PS, Kusuda S, Hakansson S, Reichman B, Lui K, Lehtonen L, Modi N, Vento M, Adams M, Rusconi F, Norman M, Darlow BA, Lodha A, Yang J, Bassler D, Helenius KK, Isayama T, Lee SKet al., 2018, Neonatal Outcomes of Very Preterm or Very Low Birth Weight Triplets, PEDIATRICS, Vol: 142, ISSN: 0031-4005

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Costeloe K, Turner MA, Padula MA, Shah PS, Modi N, Soll R, Haumont D, Kusuda S, Goepel W, Chang YS, Smith PB, Lui K, Davis JM, Hudson LDet al., 2018, Sharing Data to Accelerate Medicine Development and Improve Neonatal Care: Data Standards and Harmonized Definitions, JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS, Vol: 203, Pages: 437-+, ISSN: 0022-3476

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Neu J, Modi N, Caplan M, 2018, Necrotizing enterocolitis comes in different forms: Historical perspectives and defining the disease, SEMINARS IN FETAL & NEONATAL MEDICINE, Vol: 23, Pages: 370-373, ISSN: 1744-165X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Villeneuve E, Landa P, Allen M, Spencer A, Prosser S, Gibson A, Kelsey K, Mujica-Mota R, Manktelow B, Modi N, Thornton S, Pitt Met al., 2018, A framework to address key issues of neonatal service configuration in England: the NeoNet multimethods study, Health Services and Delivery Research, Vol: 6, Pages: 1-160, ISSN: 2050-4349

<jats:sec id="abs1-1"> <jats:title>Background</jats:title> <jats:p>There is an inherent tension in neonatal services between the efficiency and specialised care that comes with centralisation and the provision of local services with associated ease of access and community benefits. This study builds on previous work in South West England to address these issues at a national scale.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec id="abs1-2"> <jats:title>Objectives</jats:title> <jats:p>(1) To develop an analytical framework to address key issues of neonatal service configuration in England, (2) to investigate visualisation tools to facilitate the communication of findings to stakeholder groups and (3) to assess parental preferences in relation to service configuration alternatives.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec id="abs1-3"> <jats:title>Main outcome measures</jats:title> <jats:p>The ability to meet nurse staffing guidelines, volumes of units, costs, mortality, number and distance of transfers, travel distances and travel times for parents.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec id="abs1-4"> <jats:title>Design</jats:title> <jats:p>Descriptive statistics, location analysis, mathematical modelling, discrete event simulation and economic analysis were used. Qualitative methods were used to interview policy-makers and parents. A parent advisory group supported the study.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec id="abs1-5"> <jats:title>Setting</jats:title> <jats:p>NHS neonatal services across England.</jats:p>

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Modi N, Clarke J, McKee M, 2018, Health systems should be publicly funded and publicly provided, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 362, ISSN: 1756-1833

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Persson M, Shah PS, Rusconi F, Reichman B, Modi N, Kusuda S, Lehtonen L, Hakansson S, Yang J, Isayama T, Beltempo M, Lee S, Norman Met al., 2018, Association of Maternal Diabetes With Neonatal Outcomes of Very Preterm and Very Low-Birth-Weight Infants An International Cohort Study, JAMA PEDIATRICS, Vol: 172, Pages: 867-875, ISSN: 2168-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Molloy EJ, Gale C, Marsh M, Bearer CF, Devane D, Modi Net al., 2018, Developing core outcome set for women's, newborn, and child health: the CROWN Initiative, PEDIATRIC RESEARCH, Vol: 84, Pages: 316-317, ISSN: 0031-3998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wong HS, Cowan FM, Modi N, 2018, Validity of neurodevelopmental outcomes of children born very preterm assessed during routine clinical follow-up in England, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION, Vol: 103, Pages: F479-F484, ISSN: 1359-2998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Battersby C, Statnikov Y, Santhakumaran S, Gray D, Modi N, Costeloe Ket al., 2018, The United Kingdom National Neonatal Research Database: A validation study, PLOS ONE, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Li Y, Liu X, Modi N, Uthaya Set al., 2018, Impact of breast milk intake on body composition at term in very preterm babies: secondary analysis of the Nutritional Evaluation and Optimisation in Neonates randomised controlled trial., Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of breast milk (BM) intake on body composition at term in very preterm infants. DESIGN: Preplanned secondary analysis of the Nutritional Evaluation and Optimisation in Neonates Study, a 2-by-2 factorial randomised controlled trial of preterm parenteral nutrition (PN). SETTING: Four National Health Service hospitals in London and South-East England. PATIENTS: Infants born at <31 weeks of gestation; infants with life-threatening congenital abnormalities and those unable to receive trial PN within 24 hours of birth were ineligible. 133 infants survived and underwent whole-body MRI at term (37-44 weeks postmenstrual age). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Non-adipose tissue mass (non-ATM), ATM and ATM as a percentage of body weight (% ATM) at term. RESULTS: Compared with the exclusively BM group (proportion of BM=100% milk, n=56), predominantly formula-fed infants (BM ≤50%, n=38) weighed 283.6 g (95% CI 121.6 to 445.6) more, had 257.4 g (139.1-375.7) more non-ATM and a greater positive weight Z-score change between birth and term. There were no significant differences in weight, non-ATM and weight Z-score change between the exclusively and predominantly BM (BM 51%-99%, n=39) groups. Compared with the exclusively BM group no significant differences were observed in ATM and %ATM in the predominantly BM and predominantly formula-fed groups. CONCLUSIONS: The slower weight gain of preterm infants fed BM appears to be due to a deficit in non-ATM and may reflect lower protein intake. Whether this pattern persists into childhood, is altered by BM fortification or later diet, or relates to functional outcomes, are important research questions. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN29665319, post results.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gale C, Statnikov Y, Jawad S, Uthaya SN, Modi Net al., 2018, Neonatal brain injuries in England: population-based incidence derived from routinely recorded clinical data held in the National Neonatal Research Database, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION, Vol: 103, Pages: F301-F306, ISSN: 1359-2998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Santhakumaran S, Statnikov Y, Gray D, Battersby C, Ashby D, Modi Net al., 2018, Survival of very preterm infants admitted to neonatal care in England 2008-2014: time trends and regional variation, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION, Vol: 103, Pages: F208-F215, ISSN: 1359-2998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Modi N, 2018, The case for child health, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD, Vol: 103, Pages: 316-318, ISSN: 0003-9888

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Helenius K, Sjörs G, Shah PS, Modi N, Reichman B, Morisaki N, Kusuda S, Lui K, Darlow BA, Bassler D, Hakansson S, Adams M, Vento M, Rusconi F, Isayama T, Lee SK, Lehtonen Let al., 2018, Survival in very preterm infants: An international comparison of 10 national neonatal networks, Obstetrical and Gynecological Survey, Vol: 73, Pages: 187-189, ISSN: 0029-7828

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Helenius K, Sjors G, Shah PS, Modi N, Reichman B, Morisaki N, Kusuda S, Lui K, Darlow BA, Bassler D, Hakansson S, Adams M, Vento M, Rusconi F, Isayama T, Lee SK, Lehtonen Let al., 2018, Survival in Very Preterm Infants: An International Comparison of 10 National Neonatal Networks, OBSTETRICAL & GYNECOLOGICAL SURVEY, Vol: 73, Pages: 187-189, ISSN: 0029-7828

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Battersby C, Santhalingam T, Costeloe K, Modi Net al., 2018, Incidence of neonatal necrotising enterocolitis in high-income countries: a systematic review, ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD-FETAL AND NEONATAL EDITION, Vol: 103, Pages: F182-F189, ISSN: 1359-2998

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Battersby C, Mousinho RMA, Longford N, Modi Net al., 2018, Use of pasteurised human donor milk across neonatal networks in England, EARLY HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 118, Pages: 32-36, ISSN: 0378-3782

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Webbe J, Modi N, Gale C, 2018, Core Quality and Outcome Measures for Pediatric Health RESPONSE, JAMA PEDIATRICS, Vol: 172, Pages: 299-300, ISSN: 2168-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Adams GGW, Williams C, Modi N, Xing W, Bunce C, Dahlmann-Noor Aet al., 2018, Can we reduce the burden of the current UK guidelines for retinopathy of prematurity screening?, EYE, Vol: 32, Pages: 235-237, ISSN: 0950-222X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Beltempo M, Isayama T, Vento M, Lui K, Kusuda S, Lehtonen L, Sjors G, Hakansson S, Adams M, Noguchi A, Reichman B, Darlow BA, Morisaki N, Bassler D, Pratesi S, Lee SK, Lodha A, Modi N, Helenius K, Shah PSet al., 2018, Respiratory Management of Extremely Preterm Infants: An International Survey, NEONATOLOGY, Vol: 114, Pages: 28-36, ISSN: 1661-7800

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Binder C, Longford N, Gale C, Modi N, Uthaya Set al., 2018, Body Composition following Necrotising Enterocolitis in Preterm Infants, NEONATOLOGY, Vol: 113, Pages: 242-248, ISSN: 1661-7800

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Achana F, Petrou S, Khan K, Gaye A, Modi Net al., 2018, A methodological framework for assessing agreement between cost-effectiveness outcomes estimated using alternative sources of data on treatment costs and effects for trial-based economic evaluations, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF HEALTH ECONOMICS, Vol: 19, Pages: 75-86, ISSN: 1618-7598

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Winch R, McColgan MP, Sparrow E, Modi N, Greenough Aet al., 2018, Public and patient involvement in child health research and service improvements: a survey of hospital doctors., BMJ Paediatr Open, Vol: 2

Objectives: To determine whether paediatricians are supported by their organisations to encourage patient and public involvement (PPI) in research activities and clinical improvement work, the challenges they face and how they think these could be addressed by the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH). Design: A survey. Setting: UK consultant paediatricians and staff associate specialist and specialty (SAS) doctors who are members of RCPCH. Main outcome measures: The proportion of respondents who said that PPI was central to research and service improvements in their organisation, the type of local support for PPI activity, challenges in undertaking PPI and the support members wanted from RCPCH. Results: There was a response rate of 44.4% (n=1924). In their organisation, 29.1% of respondents stated PPI was central to research and 36.1% to service improvement; 46% were unaware of support for PPI and 15% said there was no support. The main challenges for PPI activity were a lack of clinician time, local support and funding. Respondents wanted RCPCH to advocate for protected time for PPI, provide access to PPI groups and deliver guidance and training. Conclusions: The majority of paediatricians feel unsupported to undertake PPI activity by their local organisation. The RCPCH has a key role to enable all paediatricians to work with children, young people and their carers to improve the quality of research and clinical services as demonstrated by RCPCH's ongoing activity in these crucial and important areas.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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