Imperial College London

ProfessorNelsonPhillips

Business School

Abu Dhabi Chamber Chair in Innovation and Strategy
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1699n.phillips

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Donna Sutherland-Smith +44 (0)20 7594 1916

 
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Location

 

296Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

110 results found

Hampel C, Perkmann M, Phillips N, Beyond the Lean Start-Up: Experimentation in Corporate Entrepreneurship and Innovation, Innovation: Organization & Management

Journal article

Pirson MA, Adler PS, Barney JB, Bartunek JM, Patient DL, Phillips N, Pitelis CN, Walsh JPet al., 2019, From Crisis to Enlivenment: An AOM President Responds to EO13769, JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT INQUIRY, Vol: 28, Pages: 291-297, ISSN: 1056-4926

Journal article

Lefrud L, Graves H, Phillips N, ‘Giant toxic lakes you can see from space’: a theory of multimodal messages and emotionality in legitimacy work, Organization Studies, ISSN: 1741-3044

Journal article

Nicolay CR, Williams SP, Brkic M, Purkayastha S, Chaturvedi S, Phillips N, Darzi Aet al., 2019, Measuring the organisational health of acute sector healthcare organisations: Development and validation of the Healthcare-OH survey, International Journal of Healthcare Management, ISSN: 2047-9700

© 2019, © 2019 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. Healthy organisations have a strong provision of the vital elements required for long-term sustainable success and proponents of organisational health concern themselves with the recognition and measurement of these elements. However, despite many leading companies focussing on organisational health in addition to organisational performance there has been very limited work within the context of healthcare to date. This is the first study to look specifically at the measurement of organisational health within the context of acute sector healthcare organisations. The Healthcare-OH survey was developed in three sequential stages. In the first, a qualitative interview study was used to establish the elements of organisational health within acute sector healthcare organisations. The second stage involved item generation to formulate a draft questionnaire which was then piloted across a sample of healthcare staff and analysed by way of exploratory factor analysis to create the final questionnaire. The third stage comprised a final round of pilot testing with confirmatory factor analysis to confirm data model fit. We believe that the Healthcare-OH survey provides an innovative and novel way of considering the performance of healthcare organisations.

Journal article

Phillips N, 2018, What is academic success anyway? A rejoinder to ‘confronting the crisis of confidence in management studies’, Academy of Management Learning and Education, ISSN: 1537-260X

Journal article

Seidel V, Hannigan T, Phillips N, 2018, Rumor communities, social media, and forthcoming innovations: the shaping of technological frames in product market evolution, Academy of Management Review, ISSN: 0363-7425

Technological frames provide an interpretive mechanism for individuals to evaluate new product innovations. These frames therefore play an important role in product market evolution. But how are technological frames themselves shaped? Prior research has demonstrated how technological frames are influenced by consumers’ direct experience with new products and are informed by traditional media evaluations. More recently, however, the emergence of social media has resulted in the development of new arenas where consumers, producers, and other actors discuss and debate forthcoming product innovations by exchanging rumors and propositions. Integrating insights from the sociology of rumor and the affordances of social media, we propose a model of how online product rumor communities shape technological frames in a way not accounted for by prior models of innovation and product market evolution. Online product rumor communities influence product market evolution not only when products are released but also in the “pre-history” of product markets.

Journal article

Tracey P, Dalpiaz E, Phillips N, 2018, Fish out of water: translation, legitimation, and new venture creation, Academy of Management Journal, Vol: 61, ISSN: 0001-4273

We draw on institutional theory to study a common type of new venture creation that has been neglected in the literature: the translation of an existing organizational form from a different—and misaligned—institutional context. To do so, we conducted an in-depth case study of H-Farm, an Italian venture that was founded as a business incubator, a type of organization that first emerged in Silicon Valley and other U.S. technology regions. Our study illuminates the specific configuration of legitimacy pressures inherent in this type of entrepreneurship, and theorizes the strategies that entrepreneurs can enact to address them: local authentication work, category authentication work, and dual optimal distinctiveness work. We also show that the legitimacy pressures experienced by entrepreneurs may vary significantly as ventures mature, and challenge the notion of a specific “legitimacy threshold” that new ventures are required to reach. Finally, our model conceptualizes translation as an iterative, dynamic, and ongoing accomplishment rather than a “one off” activity with clear beginning and end points.

Journal article

Perkmann M, McKelvey M, Phillips N, 2018, Protecting scientists from Gordon Gekko: how organizations use hybrid spaces to engage with multiple institutional logics, Organization Science, Vol: 30, Pages: 235-445, ISSN: 1047-7039

Previous work on institutional complexity has discussed two solutions that organizations deploy internally when engaging externally with multiple institutional logics: blended hybrids where logics are combined throughout the organization, and structural hybrids where different logics dominate in different compartments within the organization. While blended hybrids have been extensively investigated, few studies have examined how structural hybrids are constructed and maintained. We address this imbalance by studying university-industry research centers as instances of distinct organizational spaces used to engage with a minority logic. We found that these spaces require three kinds of work: (a) leveraging, where dominant logic practices are drawn on to achieve minority logic objectives; (b) hybridizing, where the practices inside the space are modified to allow engagement with the minority logic; and (c) bolstering, where the space is shielded against excessive minority logic influence and anchored back into the organization. Furthermore, contrary to the existing literature we found that the spaces were hybrid, rather than being dominated by a single logic. Our finding is likely generalizable across many instances of structural hybrids given the integration problems that organizations with pure single logic spaces would face, combined with the usefulness of hybrid spaces. Our study is novel in revealing the work needed to sustain hybrid spaces and questioning the previously held conceptualization of structural hybrids as made up of single-logic compartments.

Journal article

Phillips N, 2017, Nine years at the helm: reflections on being JMI Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Management Inquiry, Vol: 26, Pages: 440-442, ISSN: 1056-4926

Journal article

Phillips N, 2017, Collaborating against Human Trafficking: Cross-sector Challenges and Practices, Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol: 62, Pages: NP27-NP30, ISSN: 0001-8392

Journal article

Zyglidopoulos S, Hirsch P, de Holan PM, Phillips Net al., 2017, Expanding Research on Corporate Corruption, Management, and Organizations, JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT INQUIRY, Vol: 26, Pages: 247-253, ISSN: 1056-4926

Journal article

Phillips NW, Malhotra N, 2017, Language, Cognition and Institutions: Studying Institutionalization Using Linguistic Methods, The SAGE Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism, Editors: Greenwood, Oliver, Lawrence, Meyer, Publisher: Sage, Pages: 392-417, ISBN: 9781412961967

The second edition of the bestselling The SAGE Handbook of Organizational Institutionalism has been thoroughly revised with new chapters added, bringing together extensive coverage of aspects of Institutional Theory.

Book chapter

Villani E, Greco L, Phillips NW, 2017, Understanding value creation in public-private partnerships: a comparative case study, Journal of Management Studies, Vol: 54, Pages: 876-905, ISSN: 1467-6486

Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) are an important form of hybrid organization that may, if properly designed and managed, generate innovative solutions to complex problems by combining different institutional logics. Using data from a comparative case study of the creation of two PPPs in the Italian healthcare sector, we draw on ideas from business model design and organizational hybridity to explore how complexity can be managed inside PPPs and how this drives the creation of value for stakeholders. We link the literature on hybrid organizations with the one on business models by looking at the organizational mechanisms and processes that are implemented in PPP project governance, assets and processes. We go on to develop a theoretical model showing how effective business model design can help to bridge different logics and create value for stakeholders in the creation and operation of PPPs.

Journal article

Perkmann M, Phillips N, 2017, Editorial: Using and developing organization theory to study innovation, Innovation: Organization & Management, Vol: 19, Pages: 1-4, ISSN: 2204-0226

Journal article

Dodgson M, Perkmann M, Phillips N, 2016, Introduction to the retrospective section: innovation in China, grassroots innovation, and city regions, Innovation: Management, Policy and Practice, Vol: 18, Pages: 411-412, ISSN: 1447-9338

Journal article

Stackman RW, Phillips N, 2016, Untitled: From the Editors-in-Chief, Journal of Management Inquiry, Vol: 25, Pages: 119-121, ISSN: 1552-6542

Journal article

Surachaikulwattana P, Phillips NW, 2016, Institutions as Process, Sage Handbook of Process Organizational Studies, Editors: Langley, Tsoukas

Institutional theory is fundamentally a process theory. Yet, much of the early work in institutional theory focused narrowly on the effects of institutions and failed to make the most of this important point. Even more surprising, few of the more recent studies that adopt a more process-oriented view connect explicitly with the literature on process theorizing and methodology. In this chapter, we explore what this means in three steps. First, we discuss how process thinking has been a taken-for-granted part of understandings of institutionalization from the inception of institutional theory. Second, we examine how process thinking has implicitly shaped the central concepts of new institutional theory. Finally, we discuss future directions and the potential of process theory to contribute to the development of a more process oriented theory of institutions.

Book chapter

Kyratsis Y, Atun R, Phillips NW, Tracey P, George Get al., 2016, Health Systems in Transition: Professional Identity Work in the Context of Shifting Institutional Logics, Academy of Management Journal, ISSN: 0001-4273

We investigate how established professionals manage their identities in the face of identity threats from a contested shift in the professional logic that characterizes their field. To do so, we draw on interviews with 113 physicians from five European transition countries who faced pressure for change in their professional identities due to a shift in the logic of healthcare from a logic of “narrow specialism” in primary care that characterized the Soviet health system to a new logic of “generalism” that characterizes primary care in the West. We found three important forms of professional identity threats experienced by physicians during this period – professional values conflict, status loss, and social identity conflict. In addition, we identified three forms of identity work – authenticating, reframing, and cultural repositioning – that the professionals who successfully transitioned to the new identity performed in order to reconstruct their professional identities so that they were aligned with the new logic. Based on these findings, we present a model of how established professionals change their professional identities as a result of a contested shift in the professional logic of their field and discuss the underlying mechanisms through which this occurs.

Journal article

Zhu Y, Rooney D, Phillips N, 2015, Practice-Based Wisdom Theory for Integrating Institutional Logics: A New Model for Social Entrepreneurship Learning and Education, ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT LEARNING & EDUCATION, Vol: 15, Pages: 607-625, ISSN: 1537-260X

Journal article

Phillips NW, Rajwani T, Lawton T, 2015, The “Voice of Industry”: Why management researchers should pay more attention to trade associations, Strategic Organization, Vol: 13, Pages: 224-232, ISSN: 1741-315X

Trade associations work to influence regulation, government policy, and public opinion on behalf of the collective needs and objectives of their members. They also serve as agents for disseminating and exchanging information within industries, and often act as informal regulators by setting voluntary standards of behavior for industry members. Yet, despite the obvious importance of trade associations for firms, industries and societies, management and organization researchers have devoted surprisingly little attention to understanding them. In this essay, we argue that researchers must develop a deeper understanding of their purpose, sources of influence, and impact on companies, industries and society. We go on to discuss three examples of areas of management research – institutional theory, collective identity and nonmarket strategy – where we believe trade associations are of particular relevance and where existing theoretical perspectives remain limited without an explicit consideration of these important organizations.

Journal article

Tracey P, Phillips N, 2015, Managing the consequences of organizational stigmatization: identity work in a social enterprise, Academy of Management Journal, Vol: 59, Pages: 740-765, ISSN: 0001-4273

In this inductive study, we shift the focus of stigma research inside organizational boundaries by examining its relationship with organizational identity. To do so, we draw on the case of Keystone, a social enterprise in the East of England that became stigmatized after it initiated a program of support for a group of migrants in its community. Keystone’s stigmatization precipitated a crisis of organizational identity. We examine how the identity crisis unfolded, focusing on the forms of identity work that Keystone’s leaders enacted in response in order to reframe the meaning that organizational members attached to the stigma. Interestingly, we show not only that the internal effects of stigmatization on identity can be managed, but also that they may facilitate unexpected positive outcomes for organizations.

Journal article

, 2014,

Book

Phillips N, Trank CQ, 2014, Untitled, JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT INQUIRY, Vol: 23, Pages: 3-4, ISSN: 1056-4926

Journal article

Dodgson M, Gann DM, Phillips N, 2013, The Oxford Handbook of Innovation Management, Publisher: Oxford University Press, ISBN: 9780199694945

This volume provides a wide range of perspectives on the nature of innovation management and its influences.

Book

Phillips N, 2013, Editor's Introduction, JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT INQUIRY, Vol: 22, Pages: 359-359, ISSN: 1056-4926

Journal article

Phillips N, 2013, Editor's Introduction, JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT INQUIRY, Vol: 22, Pages: 259-259, ISSN: 1056-4926

Journal article

Canato A, Ravasi D, Phillips N, 2013, Coerced Practice Implementation in Cases of Low Cultural Fit: Cultural Change and Practice Adaptation During the Implementation of Six Sigma at 3M, Academy of Management Journal, Vol: n/a, ISSN: 0001-4273

Journal article

Dodgson M, Gann DM, Phillips N, 2013, Organizational Learning and the Technology of Foolishness: The Case of Virtual Worlds at IBM, Organization Science, Vol: 24, Pages: 1358-1376, ISSN: 1047-7039

Journal article

Phillips N, 2013, Embracing New Directions in Workplace Bullying Research: A Paradigmatic Approach Introduction, JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT INQUIRY, Vol: 22, Pages: 25-25, ISSN: 1056-4926

Journal article

Phillips N, 2013, Managing Musically: How Acoustic Space Informs Management Practice Introduction, JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT INQUIRY, Vol: 22, Pages: 37-37, ISSN: 1056-4926

Journal article

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