Imperial College London

ProfessorNilayShah

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Chemical Engineering

Head of Department of Chemical Engineering
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6621n.shah

 
 
//

Assistant

 

Miss Raluca Leonte +44 (0)20 7594 5557

 
//

Location

 

ACEX 304/5ACE ExtensionSouth Kensington Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

349 results found

Samsatli S, Samsatli NJ, Shah N, Whole-system optimisation of integrated wind-electricity-hydrogen networks for decarbonising the domestic transport sector in Great Britain, World Hydrogen Technical Conference 2015

CONFERENCE PAPER

Samsatli S, Samsatli NJ, Shah N, Optimal design and operation of integrated wind-hydrogen-electricity networks for decarbonising the domestic transport sector in Great Britain, Fuel Cell & Hydrogen Technical Conference 2015

CONFERENCE PAPER

Sharifzadeh M, Richard CJ, Liu K, Hellgardt K, Chadwick D, Shah Net al., 2015, An integrated process for biomass pyrolysis oil upgrading: A synergistic approach, Biomass & Bioenergy, Vol: 76, Pages: 108-117, ISSN: 0961-9534

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Sharifzadeh M, Wang L, Shah N, 2015, Integrated biorefineries: CO2 utilization for maximum biomass conversion, Renewable & Sustainable Energy Reviews, Vol: 47, Pages: 151-161, ISSN: 1364-0321

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Voll P, Jennings M, Hennen M, Shah N, Bardow Aet al., 2015, The optimum is not enough: A near-optimal solution paradigm for energy systems synthesis, ENERGY, Vol: 82, Pages: 446-456, ISSN: 0360-5442

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Stockford C, Brandon N, Irvine J, Mays T, Metcalfe I, Book D, Ekins P, Kucernak A, Molkov V, Steinberger-Wilckens R, Shah N, Dodds P, Dueso C, Samsatli S, Thompson Cet al., 2015, H2FC SUPERGEN: An overview of the Hydrogen and Fuel Cell research across the UK, International Journal of Hydrogen Energy, Vol: 40, Pages: 5534-5543, ISSN: 1879-3487

The United Kingdom has a vast scientific base across the entire Hydrogen and Fuel Cell research landscape, with a world class academic community coupled with significant industrial activity from both UK-based Hydrogen and Fuel Cell companies and global companies with a strong presence within the country. The Hydrogen and Fuel Cell (H2FC) SUPERGEN Hub, funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC), was established in 2012 as a five-year programme to bring the UK's H2FC research community together. Here we present the UK's current Hydrogen and Fuel Cell activities along with the role of the H2FC SUPERGEN Hub.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Mac Dowell N, Shah N, 2015, The multi-period optimisation of an amine-based CO2 capture process integrated with a super-critical coal-fired power station for flexible operation, COMPUTERS & CHEMICAL ENGINEERING, Vol: 74, Pages: 169-183, ISSN: 0098-1354

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lomax G, Workman M, Lenton T, Shah Net al., 2015, Reframing the policy approach to greenhouse gas removal technologies, ENERGY POLICY, Vol: 78, Pages: 125-136, ISSN: 0301-4215

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Acha Izquierdo S, Shah N, Bos J, Cost effective low carbon store analysis and replication, CIBSE Technical Symposium 2015

This paper explores how low carbon buildings can be easily and cost effectivelyreplicated for a commercial retailer. The analysis investigates zero carbonsupermarkets using bio-methane combined heat and power (CHP). Results showthat CHP & district heating is the most cost effective design for a sustainablesupermarket. However, its implementation depends greatly on third parties and thusis not easy to replicate. The second best alternative is to use a CHP coupled with anOrganic Rankine Cycle (ORC) when the buildings heat-to-power ratio is below 0.5.Otherwise, a CHP with no heat recovery solution is deemed best. Overall, the mostcost effective ZCS projects are the ones implemented in stores with a high heat-topowerratio, high energy intensities and large surface floor area.

CONFERENCE PAPER

Ortiz-Gutierrez RA, Giarola S, Shah N, Bezzo Fet al., 2015, An approach to optimize multi-enterprise biofuel supply chains including Nash equilibrium models, 12TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON PROCESS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND 25TH EUROPEAN SYMPOSIUM ON COMPUTER AIDED PROCESS ENGINEERING, PT C, Vol: 37, Pages: 2255-2260, ISSN: 1570-7946

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Alhajaj A, Shah N, 2015, Multiscale Modeling of Integrated CCS Systems, International Conference of Computational Methods in Sciences and Engineering (ICCMSE), Publisher: AMER INST PHYSICS, Pages: 445-447, ISSN: 0094-243X

CONFERENCE PAPER

Streby KA, Shah N, Ranalli MA, Kunkler A, Cripe TPet al., 2015, Nothing but NET: A Review of Norepinephrine Transporter Expression and Efficacy of I-131-mIBG Therapy, PEDIATRIC BLOOD & CANCER, Vol: 62, Pages: 5-11, ISSN: 1545-5009

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Borello D, De Caprariis B, De Filippis P, Di Carlo A, Marchegiani A, Pantaleo AM, Shah N, Venturini Pet al., 2015, Thermo-Economic Assessment of a olive pomace Gasifier for Cogeneration Applications, 7th International Conference on Applied Energy (ICAE), Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, Pages: 252-258, ISSN: 1876-6102

CONFERENCE PAPER

Mehleri ED, Bhave A, Shah N, Fennell P, MacDowell Net al., 2015, Techno-economic assessment and environmental impacts of Mineral Carbonation of industrial wastes and other uses of carbon dioxide, Pages: 576-585

© 2015 The Authors. In this contribution, we present the results of an in-depth techno-economic analysis of some leading CO 2 capture and utilisation (CCU) and conversion (CCC) options. Specifically, we consider CO 2 conversion to methanol, formic acid and urea (CCC) in addition to mineral carbonation of industrial wastes (CCU). We compare the CCC and CCU options using a range of key performance indicators (KPIs), including 2nd law efficiency, CO 2 avoided and tonne Co2 /tonne product. The results indicate that CCU and CCC technologies are unlikely to provide a significant contribution to mitigating anthropogenic climate change. The primary bottleneck to industrial scale deployment of CCC technologies is likely to be the cost effective availability of low carbon-hydrogen in the case that the conversion option requires hydrogen. Further, we find that mineral carbonation may have niche applications in the context of industrial waste remediation but the large scale deployment of this technology as a substitute for the geological sequestration of CO 2 is unlikely to be either cost effective or scalable. Moreover, although formic acid offers attractive economic profiles, we note that this process is at a lower TRL (TRL 4-5). Thus, we conclude that CCC and CCU technologies are only likely to be viable at scale in the event that substantial subsidies are available to offset the high costs associated with producing renewable hydrogen and the thermodynamic cost associated with processing such a stable molecule.

CONFERENCE PAPER

Sharifzadeh M, Shah N, 2015, Biomass pyrolysis challenge: A multi-scale challenge, Pages: 649-650

CONFERENCE PAPER

Andrianopoulos E, Acha S, Shah N, 2015, Achieving net zero carbon performance in a commercial building by aligning technical and policy alternatives - An UK case study

Quantifying a detailed inventory of carbon emissions attributed to a retail building is of vital importance to minimize (or offset) their environmental impact. However, quantifying the environmental impact of a commercial building's operation has attracted great controversy regarding both the carbon fields considered within the building's operational boundaries and the different responsibility levels among participants. This paper details a robust framework on how businesses operating under UK policy can measure the operational carbon performance attributed to their buildings. Furthermore, the paper investigates how the quantified emissions can be offset in order to reach net zero carbon operational performance. The analysis is structured in three levels and its applicability is showcased through an industry-sourced example of a supermarket building. The first level aims to classify building emissions according to their sources namely electricity consumption, on-site fuel burning, water supply, transport operations and waste management & disposal. The developed carbon fields' analysis technique treats a commercial building as an on-going energy consuming system where different operations (e.g. transport activities) contribute to the building's commercial use as well as to its operational carbon footprint. In the second level, the study compares a food store's carbon footprint across different supply and operation scenarios in order to analyse how each sector can influence emissions. In the third stage, the research details the carbon off-setting achieved by installing a bioenergy combined heat and power (CHP) unit in its premises and thus achieving net zero carbon performance. Results illustrate the environmental benefits for different CHP capacity solutions. These results show how urban cogeneration plants can de-carbonise UK buildings. However, the UK carbon accounting framework is still evolving and therefore is constantly subject to regulatory changes. Conse

CONFERENCE PAPER

Giarola S, Romain C, Williams CK, Hallett JP, Shah Net al., 2015, Production of phthalic anhydride from biorenewables: process design, 12TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON PROCESS SYSTEMS ENGINEERING AND 25TH EUROPEAN SYMPOSIUM ON COMPUTER AIDED PROCESS ENGINEERING, PT C, Vol: 37, Pages: 2561-2566, ISSN: 1570-7946

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pantaleo AM, Ciliberti P, Camporeale S, Shah Net al., 2015, Thermo-economic assessment of small scale biomass CHP: steam turbines vs ORC in different energy demand segments, 7th International Conference on Applied Energy (ICAE), Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV, Pages: 1609-1617, ISSN: 1876-6102

CONFERENCE PAPER

Samsatli S, Samsatli NJ, Shah N, Optimal design of a future hydrogen supply chain using a multi-timescale and spatially-distributed model, Hydrogen & Fuel Cell SUPERGEN Researcher Conference 2014

CONFERENCE PAPER

Giarola S, Patel M, Shah N, 2014, Biomass supply chain optimisation for Organosolv-based biorefineries (vol 159, pg 387, 2014), BIORESOURCE TECHNOLOGY, Vol: 172, Pages: 467-467, ISSN: 0960-8524

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pantaleo AM, Camporeale S, Shah N, 2014, Natural gas-biomass dual fuelled microturbines: Comparison of operating strategies in the Italian residential sector, APPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING, Vol: 71, Pages: 686-696, ISSN: 1359-4311

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Boot-Handford ME, Abanades JC, Anthony EJ, Blunt MJ, Brandani S, Mac Dowell N, Fernandez JR, Ferrari M-C, Gross R, Hallett JP, Haszeldine RS, Heptonstall P, Lyngfelt A, Makuch Z, Mangano E, Porter RTJ, Pourkashanian M, Rochelle GT, Shah N, Yao JG, Fennell PSet al., 2014, Carbon capture and storage update, ENERGY & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE, Vol: 7, Pages: 130-189, ISSN: 1754-5692

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Akgul O, Mac Dowell N, Papageorgiou LG, Shah Net al., 2014, A mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) supply chain optimisation framework for carbon negative electricity generation using biomass to energy with CCS (BECCS) in the UK, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GREENHOUSE GAS CONTROL, Vol: 28, Pages: 189-202, ISSN: 1750-5836

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Shah N, Wang J, Selich-Anderson J, Graham G, Siddiqui H, Li X, Khan J, Toretsky Jet al., 2014, PBX1 Is a Favorable Prognostic Biomarker as It Modulates 13-cis Retinoic Acid-Mediated Differentiation in Neuroblastoma, CLINICAL CANCER RESEARCH, Vol: 20, Pages: 4400-4412, ISSN: 1078-0432

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Zhang Q, Shah N, Wassick J, Helling R, van Egerschot Pet al., 2014, Sustainable supply chain optimisation: An industrial case study, COMPUTERS & INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING, Vol: 74, Pages: 68-83, ISSN: 0360-8352

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Mac Dowell N, Shah N, 2014, Dynamic modelling and analysis of a coal-fired power plant integrated with a novel split-flow configuration post-combustion CO₂ capture process, International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, Vol: 27, Pages: 103-119, ISSN: 1750-5836

We present a model of a coal-fired power plant integrated with a dynamic model of a monoethanolamine (MEA)-based post-combustion CO₂ capture process. We evaluate base- and part-load operating modes of the integrated power and CO₂ capture plant. We propose a simple modification to the base-process which exploits the tradeoff between thermodynamic and rate or kinetic driving forces for mass transfer. This modification returns a portion of the regenerated solvent to the middle of the absorption column at an elevated temperature. Under base-load operation of the power plant, this modification was observed to increase the degree of CO₂ capture by 9.9% and reduce the reboiler duty by 8.3%, improving the net electrical efficiency of the decarbonised power plant from 28.27% to 29.15% - a relative increase of 2.8%. Under part-load operation, the degree of CO₂ capture increased by 1% with a concurrent reduction in reboiler duty of 16.7% and an increase in overall process efficiency of 3.25%

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Samsatli S, Shah N, Fuel cell and hydrogen systems, Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Research Meeting 2014

CONFERENCE PAPER

Todri E, Amenaghawon AN, Jimenez del Val I, Leak DJ, Kontoravdi C, Kucherenko S, Shah Net al., 2014, Global sensitivity analysis and meta-modeling of an ethanol production process, Chemical Engineering Science, Vol: 114, Pages: 114-127

Traditional ethanol fermentation becomes inhibitory to microbial growth at ethanol concentrations that depend on the producer organism, leading to reduced ethanol productivity. Continuous ethanol removal from the fermenter could increase productivity and potentially reduce the cost of product recovery. In this work, continuous ethanol removal via in situ gas stripping in a stirred tank reactor has been investigated as a means of reducing growth inhibition and improving productivity. A dynamic mathematical model that couples ethanol fermentation with gas stripping has been developed. This has been linked to a flash separation model to represent the initial steps of product recovery. Global sensitivity analysis was used to reduce the number of uncertain parameters, the values of which were estimated with satisfactory accuracy using experimental data for ethanol production from a metabolically engineered strain of the thermophile Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius growing on cellobiose. Simulation results show that continuous ethanol fermentation with product removal by gas stripping is feasible, with the associated energy requirement, costs of gas compression and fermenter agitation being a function of the stripping gas flow rate. Finally, the conditions under which gas stripping is a practical product recovery method were established.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: limit=30&person=true&keywords=&itypes=BOOK+CHAPTER%2cCONFERENCE+PAPER%2cJOURNAL+ARTICLE%2cOTHER&respub-action=search.html&iminyear=1976&minyear=1976&imaxyear=2015&id=00005330&_type=on&page=2&maxyear=2015&type=BOOK+CHAPTER&type=CONFERENCE+PAPER&type=JOURNAL+ARTICLE&type=OTHER