Imperial College London

Mr Oliver Boughton

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Clinical Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

o.boughton

 
 
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Location

 

The MSk LabCharing Cross HospitalCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

20 results found

Boughton OR, Ma S, Zhao S, Arnold M, Lewis A, Hansen U, Cobb JP, Giuliani F, Abel RLet al., 2018, Measuring bone stiffness using spherical indentation, PLOS ONE, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lazic S, Boughton OR, Kellett C, Kader D, Villet L, Riviere Cet al., 2018, Day-case surgery for total hip and knee replacement: how safe and effective is it?, EFORT Open Reviews, Vol: 3, Pages: 130-135, ISSN: 2058-5241

Multimodal protocols for pain control, blood loss management and thromboprophylaxis have been shown to benefit patients by being more effective and as safe (fewer iatrogenic complications) as conventional protocols. Proper patient selection and education, multimodal protocols and a well-defined clinical pathway are all key for successful day-case arthroplasty. By potentially being more effective, cheaper than and as safe as inpatient arthroplasty, day-case arthroplasty might be beneficial for patients and healthcare systems.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ridzwan MIZ, Sukjamsri C, Pal B, van Arkel RJ, Bell A, Khanna M, Baskaradas A, Abel R, Boughton O, Cobb J, Hansen UNet al., 2018, Femoral fracture type can be predicted from femoral structure: A finite element study validated by digital volume correlation experiments, JOURNAL OF ORTHOPAEDIC RESEARCH, Vol: 36, Pages: 993-1001, ISSN: 0736-0266

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Riviere C, Lazic S, Boughton O, Wiart Y, Villet L, Cobb Jet al., 2018, Current concepts for aligning knee implants: patient-specific or systematic?, EFORT OPEN REVIEWS, Vol: 3, Pages: 1-6, ISSN: 2058-5241

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Arnold M, Zhao S, Ma S, Giuliani F, Hansen U, Cobb JP, Abel RL, Boughton Oet al., 2017, Microindentation - a tool for measuring cortical bone stiffness? A systematic review., Bone Joint Res, Vol: 6, Pages: 542-549, ISSN: 2046-3758

OBJECTIVES: Microindentation has the potential to measure the stiffness of an individual patient's bone. Bone stiffness plays a crucial role in the press-fit stability of orthopaedic implants. Arming surgeons with accurate bone stiffness information may reduce surgical complications including periprosthetic fractures. The question addressed with this systematic review is whether microindentation can accurately measure cortical bone stiffness. METHODS: A systematic review of all English language articles using a keyword search was undertaken using Medline, Embase, PubMed, Scopus and Cochrane databases. Studies that only used nanoindentation, cancellous bone or animal tissue were excluded. RESULTS: A total of 1094 abstracts were retrieved and 32 papers were included in the analysis, 20 of which used reference point indentation, and 12 of which used traditional depth-sensing indentation. There are several factors that must be considered when using microindentation, such as tip size, depth and method of analysis. Only two studies validated microindentation against traditional mechanical testing techniques. Both studies used reference point indentation (RPI), with one showing that RPI parameters correlate well with mechanical testing, but the other suggested that they do not. CONCLUSION: Microindentation has been used in various studies to assess bone stiffness, but only two studies with conflicting results compared microindentation with traditional mechanical testing techniques. Further research, including more studies comparing microindentation with other mechanical testing methods, is needed before microindentation can be used reliably to calculate cortical bone stiffness.Cite this article: M. Arnold, S. Zhao, S. Ma, F. Giuliani, U. Hansen, J. P. Cobb, R. L. Abel, O. Boughton. Microindentation - a tool for measuring cortical bone stiffness? A systematic review. Bone Joint Res 2017;6:542-549. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.69.BJR-2016-0317.R2.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Boughton OR, Zhao S, Arnold M, Ma S, Cobb JP, Giuliani F, Hansen U, Abel RLet al., 2017, Measuring bone stiffness using microindentation, British Orthopaedic Research Society (BORS) 2016 Conference, Publisher: British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery, Pages: 31-31, ISSN: 2049-4416

CONFERENCE PAPER

Ma S, Goh EL, Jin A, Bhattacharya R, Boughton OR, Patel B, Karunaratne A, Vo NT, Atwood R, Cobb JP, Hansen U, Abel RLet al., 2017, Long-term effects of bisphosphonate therapy: perforations, microcracks and mechanical properties, SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2045-2322

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ma S, Boughton O, Karunaratne A, Jin A, Cobb J, Hansen U, Abel Ret al., 2016, Synchrotron Imaging Assessment of Bone Quality, CLINICAL REVIEWS IN BONE AND MINERAL METABOLISM, Vol: 14, Pages: 150-160, ISSN: 1534-8644

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ma S, Goh EL, Patel B, Jin A, Boughton O, Cobb J, Hansen U, Abel RLet al., 2016, Are the cracks starting to appear in bisphosphonate therapy?, British Orthopaedic Research Society (BORS) 2016 Conference, Publisher: British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery, Pages: 53-53, ISSN: 2049-4416

CONFERENCE PAPER

Boughton OR, Bernard J, Szarko M, 2015, Odontoid process fractures: the role of the ligaments in maintaining stability. A biomechanical, cadaveric study, SICOT-J, Vol: 1, Pages: 11-11

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Crossley KM, Callaghan MJ, van Linschoten R, 2015, Patellofemoral pain, BMJ, Pages: h3939-h3939

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Khatib M, Soukup B, Boughton O, Amin K, Davis CR, Evans DMet al., 2015, Plastic Surgery Undergraduate Training, Annals of Plastic Surgery, Vol: 75, Pages: 208-212, ISSN: 0148-7043

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lazic S, Boughton O, Hing C, Bernard Jet al., 2014, Arthroscopic washout of the knee: A procedure in decline, The Knee, Vol: 21, Pages: 631-634, ISSN: 0968-0160

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Boughton O, Borgulya G, Cecconi M, Fredericks S, Moreton-Clack M, MacPhee IAMet al., 2013, A published pharmacogenetic algorithm was poorly predictive of tacrolimus clearance in an independent cohort of renal transplant recipients., Br J Clin Pharmacol, Vol: 76, Pages: 425-431

AIMS: An algorithm based on the CYP3A5 genotype to predict tacrolimus clearance to inform the optimal initial dose was derived using data from the DeKAF study (Passey et al. Br J Clin Pharmacol 2011; 72: 948-57) but was not tested in an independent cohort of patients. Our aim was to test whether the DeKAF dosing algorithm could predict estimated tacrolimus clearance in renal transplant recipients at our centre. METHODS: Predicted tacrolimus clearance based on the DeKAF algorithm was compared with dose-normalized trough whole-blood concentrations (estimated clearance) on day 7 after transplantation in a single-centre cohort of 255 renal transplant recipients. RESULTS: There was a weak correlation (r = 0.431) between clearance based on dose-normalized trough whole-blood concentrations and DeKAF algorithm-predicted clearance. The means of the tacrolimus clearance predicted by the DeKAF algorithm and the estimated tacrolimus clearance based on the dose-normalized trough blood concentrations were plotted against the differences in the clearance as a Bland-Altman plot. Logarithmic transformation was performed owing to the increased difference in tacrolimus clearance as the mean clearance increased. There was a highly significant systematic error (P < 0.0005) characterized by a sloped regression line [gradient, 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.01)] on the Bland-Altman plot. CONCLUSIONS: The DeKAF algorithm was unable to predict the estimated tacrolimus clearance accurately based on real tacrolimus doses and blood concentrations in our cohort of patients. Other genes are known to influence the clearance of tacrolimus, and a polygenic algorithm may be more predictive than those based on a single genotype.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Boughton OR, Mackenzie H, 2012, Osteoarthritis of the Trapeziometacarpal Joint (TMJ): A Review of the Literature, Osteoarthritis- Diagnosis, Treatment and Surgery

BOOK CHAPTER

Boughton O, Adds PJ, Jayasinghe JAP, 2010, The potential complications of open carpal tunnel release surgery to the ulnar neurovascular bundle and its branches: A cadaveric study, Clinical Anatomy, Vol: 23, Pages: 545-551, ISSN: 0897-3806

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Soukup B, Bishomun S, Boughton OR, Tennant Det al., Improving Undergraduate Orthopedic Surgery Skills and Knowledge in a One Day Course, Medical Science Educator

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wiik AV, Logishetty K, Brevadt MJ, Johal H, Boughton OR, Aqil A, Cobb JPet al., The loading patterns of a short femoral stem in total hip arthroplasty, Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology, ISSN: 1590-9921

Aims:The purpose of this study was to examine the gait pattern of total hip arthroplasty(THA) patients with a new short femoral stem at different speeds and inclinations.Methods:A total of 40 unilateral THA patients were tested on an instrumented treadmill. Theycomprised two groups (shorter stemmed THA n=20, longer stemmed THA n=20), bothwhich had the same surgical posterior approach. The shorter femoral stemmedpatients were taken from an ongoing hip trial with minimum 12 months postop. Thecomparative longer THR group with similar disease and severity were taken from a gaitdatabase along with a demographically similar group of healthy controls (n=35).All subjects were tested through their entire range of gait speeds and inclines withground reaction forces collected. Body weight scaling was applied and a symmetryindex to compare the implanted hip to the contralateral normal hip. An analysis ofvariance with significance set at α=0.05 was used.Results:The experimental groups were matched demographically and implant groups forpatient reported outcome measures and radiological disease. Both THA groups walkedslower than controls, but symmetry at all intervals for all groups were not significantlydifferent. Push-off loading was less favourable for both the shorter and longer stemmedTHR groups (p<0.05) depending on speed.Discussion:Irrespective of femoral stem length, symmetry for ground reaction forces for both THAgroups were returned to a normal range when compared to controls. Howeverindividual implant performance showed inferior (p<0.05) push-off forces andnormalised step length in both THR groups when compared to control

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Zhao S, Arnold M, Ma S, Abel R, Cobb J, Hansen U, Boughton ORet al., Standardising compression testing for measuring the stiffness of human bone: a systematic review, Bone and Joint Research, ISSN: 2046-3758

Objectives: The ability to determine human bone stiffness is of clinical relevance in many fields, including bone quality assessment and orthopaedic prosthesis design. Stiffness can be measured using compression testing; an experimental technique commonly used to test bone specimens in vitro. This systematic review aims to determine how best to perform compression testing of human bone. Methods: A keyword search of all English language articles up until December 2017 of compression testing of bone was undertaken in Medline, Embase, PubMed and Scopus databases. Studies using bulk tissue, animal tissue, whole bone or testing techniques other than compression testing were excluded. Results: 4712 abstracts were retrieved with a total of 177 papers included in the analysis. 20 studies directly analysed the compression testing technique to improve the accuracy of the testing technique. Several influencing factors should be considered when testing bone samples in compression. These include the method of data analysis, specimen storage, specimen preparation, testing configuration and loading protocol. Conclusions: Compression testing is a widely used technique for measuring the stiffness of bone but there is a great deal of inter-study variation in experimental techniques across the literature. Based on best evidence from the literature, suggestions for bone compression testing are made in this review, though further studies are needed to help establish standardised bone testing techniques to increase the comparability and reliability of bone stiffness studies.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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