Imperial College London

DrPervizAsaria

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Consultant Cardiologist
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2547p.asaria

 
 
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Location

 

524Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

16 results found

Kontis V, Bennett JE, Rashid T, Parks RM, Pearson-Stuttard J, Guillot M, Asaria P, Zhou B, Battaglini M, Corsetti G, McKee M, Di Cesare M, Mathers CD, Ezzati Met al., 2020, Magnitude, demographics and dynamics of the effect of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic on all-cause mortality in 21 industrialized countries, Nature Medicine, Vol: 26, Pages: 1919-1928, ISSN: 1078-8956

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed many social, economic, environmental and healthcare determinants of health. We applied an ensemble of 16 Bayesian models to vital statistics data to estimate the all-cause mortality effect of the pandemic for 21 industrialized countries. From mid-February through May 2020, 206,000 (95% credible interval, 178,100–231,000) more people died in these countries than would have had the pandemic not occurred. The number of excess deaths, excess deaths per 100,000 people and relative increase in deaths were similar between men and women in most countries. England and Wales and Spain experienced the largest effect: ~100 excess deaths per 100,000 people, equivalent to a 37% (30–44%) relative increase in England and Wales and 38% (31–45%) in Spain. Bulgaria, New Zealand, Slovakia, Australia, Czechia, Hungary, Poland, Norway, Denmark and Finland experienced mortality changes that ranged from possible small declines to increases of 5% or less in either sex. The heterogeneous mortality effects of the COVID-19 pandemic reflect differences in how well countries have managed the pandemic and the resilience and preparedness of the health and social care system.

Journal article

Moledina S, Shanmuganathan M, Baston V, Tana A, Saari G, Robertus JL, Asaria P, Riesgo-Gil F, Peterzan M, Simon A, Wong Jet al., 2020, UTILITY OF CARDIAC MRI IN PREDICTION OF ACUTE RIGHT VENTRICULAR FAILURE AFTER LVAD IMPLANTATION, Conference of American-College-of-Cardiology (ACC) / World Congress of Cardiology (WCC), Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, Pages: 1826-1826, ISSN: 0735-1097

Conference paper

Sarri G, Halim K, McCurry M, Pierce I, Asaria P, Chen Z, Rahman-Haley S, Simon A, Carby M, Reed A, Wong Jet al., 2019, Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in lung transplant assessment: the clinical significance of right ventricular-pulmonary arterial coupling and right ventricular trabecular complexity, Congress of the European-Society-of-Cardiology (ESC) / World Congress of Cardiology, Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, Pages: 205-205, ISSN: 0195-668X

Conference paper

Asaria P, Elliott P, Douglass M, Obermeyer Z, Soljak M, Majeed A, Ezzati Met al., 2017, Acute myocardial infarction hospital admissions and deaths in England: a national follow-back and follow-forward record-linkage study, Lancet Public Health, Vol: 2, Pages: e191-e201, ISSN: 2468-2667

Background Little information is available on how primary and comorbid acute myocardial infarction contribute to the mortality burden of acute myocardial infarction, the share of these deaths that occur during or after a hospital admission, and the reasons for hospital admission of those who died from acute myocardial infarction. Our aim was to fill in these gaps in the knowledge about deaths and hospital admissions due to acute myocardial infarction. Methods We used individually linked national hospital admission and mortality data for England from 2006 to 2010 to identify all primary and comorbid diagnoses of acute myocardial infarction during hospital stay and their associated fatality rates (during or within 28 days of being in hospital). Data were obtained from the UK Small Area Health Statistics Unit and supplied by the Health and Social Care Information Centre (now NHS Digital) and the Office of National Statistics. We calculated event rates (reported as per 100 000 population for relevant age and sex groups) and case-fatality rate for primary acute myocardial infarction diagnosed during the first physician encounter or during subsequent encounters, and acute myocardial infarction diagnosed only as a comorbidity. We also calculated what proportion of deaths from acute myocardial infarction occurred in people who had been in hospital on or within the 28 days preceding death, and whether acute myocardial infarction was one of the recorded diagnoses in such admissions. Findings Acute myocardial infarction was diagnosed in the first physician encounter in 307 496 (69%) of 446 744 admissions with a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction, in the second or later physician encounter in 52 374 (12%) admissions, and recorded only as a comorbidity in 86 874 (19%) admissions. Patients with comorbid diagnoses of acute myocardial infarction had two to three times the case-fatality rate of patients in whom acute myocardial infarction was a primary diagnosis. 135 950 death

Journal article

Grey C, Jackson R, Schmidt M, Ezzati M, Asaria P, Exeter DJ, Kerr AJet al., 2017, One in four major ischaemic heart disease events are fatal and 60% are pre-hospital deaths: a national data-linkage study (ANZACS-QI 8), EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Vol: 38, Pages: 172-180, ISSN: 0195-668X

Journal article

Fontana M, Asaria P, Moraldo M, Finegold J, Hassanally K, Manisty CH, Francis DPet al., 2014, Patient-Accessible Tool for Shared Decision Making in Cardiovascular Primary Prevention Balancing Longevity Benefits Against Medication Disutility, CIRCULATION, Vol: 129, Pages: 2539-2546, ISSN: 0009-7322

Journal article

Nowbar AN, Howard JP, Finegold JA, Asaria P, Francis DPet al., 2014, 2014 Global geographic analysis of mortality from ischaemic heart disease by country, age and income: Statistics from World Health Organisation and United Nations, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 174, Pages: 293-298, ISSN: 0167-5273

Journal article

Cook C, Cole G, Asaria P, Jabbour R, Francis DPet al., 2014, The annual global economic burden of heart failure, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 171, Pages: 368-376, ISSN: 0167-5273

Journal article

Finegold JA, Asaria P, Francis DP, 2013, Mortality from ischaemic heart disease by country, region, and age: Statistics from World Health Organisation and United Nations, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 168, Pages: 934-945, ISSN: 0167-5273

Journal article

Di Cesare M, Khang Y-H, Asaria P, Blakely T, Cowan MJ, Farzadfar F, Guerrero R, Ikeda N, Kyobutungi C, Msyamboza KP, Oum S, Lynch JW, Marmot MG, Ezzati Met al., 2013, Inequalities in non-communicable diseases and effective responses, LANCET, Vol: 381, Pages: 585-597, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Asaria P, Fortunato L, Fecht D, Tzoulaki I, Jose Abellan J, Hambly P, de Hoogh K, Ezzati M, Elliott Pet al., 2012, Trends and inequalities in cardiovascular disease mortality across 7932 English electoral wards, 1982-2006: Bayesian spatial analysis, International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol: 41, Pages: 1737-1749, ISSN: 1464-3685

Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality has more than halved in England since the 1980s, but there are few data on small-area trends. We estimated CVD mortality by ward in 5-year intervals between 1982 and 2006, and examined trends in relation to starting mortality, region and community deprivation.Methods We analysed CVD death rates using a Bayesian spatial technique for all 7932 English electoral wards in consecutive 5-year intervals between 1982 and 2006, separately for men and women aged 30–64 years and ≥65 years.Results Age-standardized CVD mortality declined in the majority of wards, but increased in 186 wards for women aged ≥65 years. The decline was larger where starting mortality had been higher. When grouped by deprivation quintile, absolute inequality between most- and least-deprived wards narrowed over time in those aged 30–64 years, but increased in older adults; relative inequalities worsened in all four age–sex groups. Wards with high CVD mortality in 2002–06 fell into two groups: those in and around large metropolitan cities in northern England that started with high mortality in 1982–86 and could not ‘catch up’, despite impressive declines, and those that started with average or low mortality in the 1980s but ‘fell behind’ because of small mortality reductions.Conclusions Improving population health and reducing health inequalities should be treated as related policy and measurement goals. Ongoing analysis of mortality by small area is essential to monitor local effects on health and health inequalities of the public health and healthcare systems.

Journal article

Beaglehole R, Bonita R, Horton R, Adams C, Alleyne G, Asaria P, Baugh V, Bekedam H, Billo N, Casswell S, Cecchini M, Colagiuri R, Colagiuri S, Collins T, Ebrahim S, Engelgau M, Galea G, Gaziano T, Geneau R, Haines A, Hospedales J, Jha P, Keeling A, Leeder S, Lincoln P, McKee M, Mackay J, Magnusson R, Moodie R, Mwatsama M, Nishtar S, Norrving B, Patterson D, Piot P, Ralston J, Rani M, Reddy KS, Sassi F, Sheron N, Stuckler D, Suh I, Torode J, Varghese C, Watt Jet al., 2011, Priority actions for the non-communicable disease crisis, LANCET, Vol: 377, Pages: 1438-1447, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Asaria P, Francis DP, 2011, Heart Forecast for cardiovascular risk assessment, HEART, Vol: 97, Pages: 173-174, ISSN: 1355-6037

Journal article

Ferenczi EA, Asaria P, Hughes AD, Chaturvedi N, Francis DPet al., 2010, Can a Statin Neutralize the Cardiovascular Risk of Unhealthy Dietary Choices?, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 106, Pages: 587-592, ISSN: 0002-9149

Journal article

Asaria P, Beaglehole R, Chisholm D, Gaziano TA, Horton R, Leeder S, Lim SS, Mathers C, Reddy S, Strong K, Voute Jet al., 2010, Chronic disease prevention: the importance of calls to action., Int J Epidemiol, Vol: 39, Pages: 309-310

Journal article

Asaria P, Chisholm D, Mathers C, Ezzati M, Beaglehole Ret al., 2007, Chronic diseases 3 - Chronic disease prevention: health effects and financial costs of strategies to reduce salt intake and control tobacco use, LANCET, Vol: 370, Pages: 2044-2053, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

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