Imperial College London

Dr Peter Hellyer

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Medicine

Honorary Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9568peter.hellyer

 
 
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Location

 

4.35Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

52 results found

Nigmatullina Y, Hellyer PM, Nachev P, Sharp D, Seemungal BMet al., 2014, The neuroanatomical correlates of vestibular adaptation in ballet dancers, Joint Congress of European Neurology, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 278-278, ISSN: 1351-5101

Conference paper

Kwok H-T, Baxter D, DeFelice J, Hellyer P, Kirkman E, Watts S, Midwinter M, Gentleman S, Sharp Det al., 2014, The neuropathology of blast traumatic brain injury in a porcine polytrauma model, BRAIN INJURY, Vol: 28, Pages: 779-780, ISSN: 0269-9052

Journal article

Carhart-Harris RL, Leech R, Hellyer PJ, Shanahan M, Feilding A, Tagliazucchi E, Chialvo DR, Nutt Det al., 2014, The entropic brain: a theory of conscious states informed by neuroimaging research with psychedelic drugs, FRONTIERS IN HUMAN NEUROSCIENCE, Vol: 8, ISSN: 1662-5161

Journal article

Ham TE, Bonnelle V, Hellyer P, Jilka S, Robertson IH, Leech R, Sharp DJet al., 2014, The neural basis of impaired self-awareness after traumatic brain injury, BRAIN, Vol: 137, Pages: 586-597, ISSN: 0006-8950

Journal article

Hellyer PJ, Shanahan MP, Scott G, Wise RJS, Sharp DJ, Leech Ret al., 2014, The control of global brain dynamics: Opposing actions of frontoparietal control and default mode networks on attention, Journal of Neuroscience, Vol: 34, Pages: 451-461, ISSN: 1529-2401

Journal article

Baxter D, Sharp DJ, Feeney C, Papadopoulou D, Ham TE, Jilka S, Hellyer PJ, Patel MC, Bennett AN, Mistlin A, McGilloway E, Midwinter M, Goldstone APet al., 2013, Pituitary Dysfunction after Blast Traumatic Brain Injury: The UK BIOSAP Study, ANNALS OF NEUROLOGY, Vol: 74, Pages: 527-536, ISSN: 0364-5134

Journal article

Nigmatullina Y, Hellyer PJ, Nachev P, Sharp DJ, Seemungal BMet al., 2013, The Neuroanatomical Correlates of Training-Related Perceptuo-Reflex Uncoupling in Dancers, Cerebral Cortex, Vol: 25, Pages: 554-562

Sensory input evokes low-order reflexes and higher-order perceptual responses. Vestibular stimulation elicits vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) and self-motion perception (e.g., vertigo) whose response durations are normally equal. Adaptation to repeated whole-body rotations, for example, ballet training, is known to reduce vestibular responses. We investigated the neuroanatomical correlates of vestibular perceptuo-reflex adaptation in ballet dancers and controls. Dancers' vestibular-reflex and perceptual responses to whole-body yaw-plane step rotations were: (1) Briefer and (2) uncorrelated (controls' reflex and perception were correlated). Voxel-based morphometry showed a selective gray matter (GM) reduction in dancers' vestibular cerebellum correlating with ballet experience. Dancers' vestibular cerebellar GM density reduction was related to shorter perceptual responses (i.e. positively correlated) but longer VOR duration (negatively correlated). Contrastingly, controls' vestibular cerebellar GM density negatively correlated with perception and VOR. Diffusion-tensor imaging showed that cerebral cortex white matter (WM) microstructure correlated with vestibular perception but only in controls. In summary, dancers display vestibular perceptuo-reflex dissociation with the neuronatomical correlate localized to the vestibular cerebellum. Controls' robust vestibular perception correlated with a cortical WM network conspicuously absent in dancers. Since primary vestibular afferents synapse in the vestibular cerebellum, we speculate that a cerebellar gating of perceptual signals to cortical regions mediates the training-related attenuation of vestibular perception and perceptuo-reflex uncoupling.

Journal article

Hellyer PJ, Leech R, Ham TE, Bonnelle V, Sharp DJet al., 2013, Individual prediction of white matter injury following traumatic brain injury, Annals of Neurology, ISSN: 1531-8249

Journal article

Nigmatullina Y, Hellyer PJ, Nachev P, Sharp DJ, Seemungal BMet al., 2012, Attenuation of self-motion perception relates to reduced cortical connectivity, Neuroscience 2012

Conference paper

Hellyer PJ, Sharp DJ, Ham TE, Bonnelle V, Leech Ret al., 2012, White and grey matter damage after traumatic brain injury: An integrated approach to explaining cognitive function, Neuroscience 2012

Conference paper

Sharp DJ, Leech R, Ham TE, Hellyer PJ, Mistlin A, Bennett A, Kitchen N, Midwinter M, Baxter Det al., 2012, Traumatic axonal injury after exposure to blast: A comparison of white matter damage in blast and non-blast traumatic brain injury (Blast Injury Outcome Study in Armed forces Personnel - BIOSAP), Neuroscience 2012

Conference paper

Jilka S, Ham T, Pickering A, Hellyer P, Leech R, Sharp DJet al., 2012, To switch or not to switch: Posterior cingulate cortex response during task switching, Neuroscience 2012

Conference paper

Josephs O, Leech R, Brownsett S, Hellyer PJ, Weiskopf Net al., 2012, Filling in Black Holes in fMRI: Dual Gradient Echo EPI with Optimized Z-Shim, Organisation for Human Brain Mapping

Conference paper

Hellyer PJ, Shanahan MP, Scott G, Wise RJS, Sharp DJ, Leech Ret al., 2012, Global network dynamics during task based activity in the brain., Organisation for Human Brain Mapping

Conference paper

Hellyer PJ, Shanahan MP, Scott G, Wise RJS, Sharp DJ, Leech Ret al., 2012, Global network dynamics during task based activity in the brain., British Association of Cognitive Neuroscience

Conference paper

Baxter D, Hellyer P, Ham T, Kinnunen K, Goldstone T, Greenwood R, Sharp Det al., 2012, White matter damage and cognitive impairment. A study comparing military blast induced brain injury with civilian diffuse axonal injury and uninjured brains, Publisher: INFORMA HEALTHCARE, Pages: 628-629, ISSN: 0269-9052

Conference paper

Sharp DJ, Hellyer PJ, Ham T, Bonnelle V, Leech Ret al., 2011, Predicting cognitive impairment after traumatic brain injury using machine learning applied to diffusion tensor imaging., Neuroscience 2011

Conference paper

Scott G, Hellyer PJ, Shanahan M, Sharp DJ, Leech Ret al., 2011, From structural networks to functional networks via coupled oscillators, Neuroscience 2011

Conference paper

Hellyer PJ, Woodhead ZVJ, Leech R, Wise RJSet al., 2011, An investigation of twenty/20 vision in reading, Neuroscience 2011

Conference paper

Ham T, Bonnelle V, Barber T, Leech R, Kinnunen KM, Beckmann CF, De Boissezon X, Greenwood RJ, Sharp DJet al., 2011, THE NEURAL BASIS OF IMPAIRED SELF-AWARENESS AFTER TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY, 10th International Neurotrauma Symposium (INTS), Publisher: MARY ANN LIEBERT INC, Pages: A7-A8, ISSN: 0897-7151

Conference paper

Hellyer PJ, Woodhead ZVJ, Leech R, Wise RJSet al., 2011, An Investigation of Twenty/20 Vision in Reading, The Journal of Neuroscience, Vol: 31, Pages: 14631-14638-14631-14638

One functional anatomical model of reading, drawing on human neuropsychological and neuroimaging data, proposes that a region in left ventral occipitotemporal cortex (vOT) becomes, through experience, specialized for written word perception. We tested this hypothesis by presenting numbers in orthographical and digital form with two task demands, phonological and numerical. We observed a main effect of task on left vOT activity but not stimulus type, with increased activity during the phonological task that was also associated with increased activity in the left inferior frontal gyrus, a region implicated in speech production. Region-of-interest analysis confirmed that there was equal activity for orthographical and digital written forms in the left vOT during the phonological task, despite greater visual complexity of the orthographical forms. This evidence is incompatible with a predominantly feedforward model of written word recognition that proposes that the left vOT is a specialized cortical module for word recognition in literate subjects. Rather, the physiological data presented here fits better with interactive computational models of reading that propose that written word recognition emerges from bidirectional interactions between three processes: visual, phonological, and semantic. Further, the present study is in accord with others that indicate that the left vOT is a route through which nonlinguistic stimuli, perhaps high contrast two-dimensional objects in particular, gain access to a predominantly left-lateralized language and semantic system.

Journal article

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Journal article

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