Imperial College London

Professor Kitney

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Bioengineering

Professor of BioMedical Systems Engineering
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6226r.kitney Website

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Tania Briggs +44 (0)20 7594 6226

 
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Location

 

3.16Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

408 results found

Tay D, Poh CL, Goh C, Kitney RIet al., 2014, A biological continuum based approach for efficient clinical classification, JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL INFORMATICS, Vol: 47, Pages: 28-38, ISSN: 1532-0464

Journal article

Dickinson RJ, Kitney RI, 2014, Information driven care pathways and procedures, IFMBE Proceedings, Vol: 41, Pages: 1322-1325, ISSN: 1680-0737

The paper addresses the issue of the implementation of care pathways in electronic form. Within the National Health Service (NHS) of England, Care Pathways are becoming increasingly important. These are typically provided by the Department of Health. The Pathways provided are in the form of paper-based schema. They either have to be implemented via paper forms or, as presented here, in electronic form. In addition, care pathways must be seen in the context of the TModel of health care which comprises the care continuum and the biological continuum. The two care pathways which had been chosen as exemplars are myocardial infarction and stroke. However, the objective of the paper is not to discuss the specific care pathways in detail, but, rather, to describe technology which has been developed for their electronic implementation. The result of this implementation is that all the data and information acquired from the implementation of the care pathway is stored in a single clinical information system (CIS), which has incorporated in it the SQL database. Another important element of the system which has been developed is the ability to display data and information in terms of two dashboards (i.e. single screens which show the most important information). The two dashboards display clinical information (the point of care dashboard) and management information (the management dashboard). © Springer International Publishing Switzerland 2014.

Journal article

Kelay T, Kesavan S, Collins RE, Kyaw-Tun J, Cox B, Bello F, Kneebone RL, Sevdalis Net al., 2013, Techniques to aid the implementation of novel clinical information systems: A systematic review, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 11, Pages: 783-791, ISSN: 1743-9191

Journal article

Tay D, Poh CL, Goh C, Kitney RIet al., 2013, An Evolutionary Data-Conscious Artificial Immune Recognition System, 15th Genetic and Evolutionary Computation Conference (GECCO), Pages: 1101-1108

Conference paper

Yang X, Han R, Guo Y, Bradley J, Cox B, Dickinson R, Kitney Ret al., 2012, Modelling and performance analysis of clinical pathways using the stochastic process algebra PEPA, Bmc Bioinformatics, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1471-2105

Journal article

Kitney R, Freemont P, 2012, Synthetic biology - the state of play, FEBS LETTERS, Vol: 586, Pages: 2029-2036, ISSN: 0014-5793

Journal article

Kitney RI, 2012, Synthetic Biology - A Primer, Publisher: Imperial College Press London

Book

Wang B, Kitney RI, Joly N, Buck Met al., 2011, Engineering modular and orthogonal genetic logic gates for robust digital-like synthetic biology, Nature Communications, Vol: 2:508

Modular and orthogonal genetic logic gates are essential for building robust biologically based digital devices to customize cell signalling in synthetic biology. Here we constructed an orthogonal AND gate in Escherichia coli using a novel hetero-regulation module from Pseudomonas syringae. The device comprises two co-activating genes hrpR and hrpS controlled by separate promoter inputs, and a σ54-dependent hrpL promoter driving the output. The hrpL promoter is activated only when both genes are expressed, generating digital-like AND integration behaviour. The AND gate is demonstrated to be modular by applying new regulated promoters to the inputs, and connecting the output to a NOT gate module to produce a combinatorial NAND gate. The circuits were assembled using a parts-based engineering approach of quantitative characterization, modelling, followed by construction and testing. The results show that new genetic logic devices can be engineered predictably from novel native orthogonal biological control elements using quantitatively in-context characterized parts.

Journal article

MacDonald JT, Barnes C, Kitney RI, Freemont PS, Stan G-BVet al., 2011, Computational design approaches and tools for synthetic biology, INTEGRATIVE BIOLOGY, Vol: 3, Pages: 97-108, ISSN: 1757-9694

Journal article

Poh CL, Cui LC, Kitney RI, 2010, Modeling biological systems in Laplace Domain for Synthetic Biology Design, WORLD CONGRESS ON MEDICAL PHYSICS AND BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, Pages: 1377-1380, ISSN: 1680-0737

Conference paper

Gulati S, Rouilly V, Niu X, Chappell J, Kitney RI, Edel JB, Freemont PS, deMello AJet al., 2009, Opportunities for microfluidic technologies in synthetic biology, JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE, Vol: 6, ISSN: 1742-5689

Journal article

Heimann T, van Ginneken B, Styner MA, Arzhaeva Y, Aurich V, Bauer C, Beck A, Becker C, Beichel R, Bekes G, Bello F, Binnig G, Bischof H, Bornik A, Cashman PMM, Chi Y, Cordova A, Dawant BM, Fidrich M, Furst JD, Furukawa D, Grenacher L, Hornegger J, Kainmueller D, Kitney RI, Kobatake H, Lamecker H, Lange T, Lee J, Lennon B, Li R, Li S, Meinzer H-P, Nemeth G, Raicu DS, Rau A-M, van Rikxoort EM, Rousson M, Rusko L, Saddi KA, Schmidt G, Seghers D, Shimizu A, Slagmolen P, Sorantin E, Soza G, Susomboon R, Waite JM, Wimmer A, Wolf Iet al., 2009, Comparison and Evaluation of Methods for Liver Segmentation From CT Datasets, IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, Vol: 28, Pages: 1251-1265, ISSN: 0278-0062

Journal article

Poh C-L, Kitney RI, Akhtar S, 2009, Web-Based Multilayer Viewing Interface for Knee Cartilage, IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN BIOMEDICINE, Vol: 13, Pages: 546-553, ISSN: 1089-7771

Journal article

Poh C-L, Kitney RI, Akhtar S, 2009, Web-based multilayer viewing interface for knee cartilage., IEEE Trans Inf Technol Biomed, Vol: 13, Pages: 546-553

Many adults suffer from osteoarthritis (OA) with the majority of people over 65 showing radiographic evidence of the disease. To carry out effective diagnosis and treatment, it is necessary to understand the progression of cartilage loss and study the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions. Hence, it is important to have accurate, fast diagnosis of the disease. In this paper, we describe a Web-based user interface that enables the direct viewing of 2-D and 3-D image data from the visceral and tissue levels of the biological continuum (i.e., the continuum comprising systems, viscera, tissue, cells, proteins, and genes)--while preserving geometric integrity. This is achieved despite the fact that the data are from different modalities (i.e., magnetic resonance (MR) and light microscopy). The user interface was tested using image data acquired from a study of articular cartilage thickness in the porcine knee. The interface allows the clinician to view both MR and light microscopy images in an integrated manner-with the information linked geometrically.

Journal article

Delakis I, Xanthis C, Kitney RI, 2009, Assessment of the limiting spatial resolution of an MRI scanner by direct analysis of the edge spread function, MEDICAL PHYSICS, Vol: 36, Pages: 1637-1642, ISSN: 0094-2405

Journal article

Kitney RI, 2009, Synthetic Biology: scope, applications and implications, Synthetic biology: scope, applications and implications, Publisher: The Royal Academy of Engineering

Report

Wang B, Kitney R, Buck M, Jovanovic M, Joly N, James Eet al., 2009, The Design and Construction of a Set of Modular Synthetic BioLogic Devices for Programming Cells, World Congress on Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering, Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg, Pages: 289-292

Modularity is an essential property for rationally engineered standard parts and devices. This principle is now being extended to biological based parts and devices for programming cells. However, the design principles and building blocks which are currently in Synthetic Biology are somewhat limited. In addition, it is important to explore the underlying mechanisms of existing, natural biological systems in order to utilise them in designing novel genetic circuit modules. In this paper, we will describe a set of modular synthetic biological parts and devices that are based in rational design. Particularly, a modular tight-controlled and hypersensitive genetic circuit with digital logic AND function is rationally designed and engineered. They use a sigma factor 54( σ 54 ) dependent hetero-regulation module in the hrp (hypersensitive response and pathogenicity) gene regulatory system for Type III secretion in Pseudomonas syringae . Their inputs and outputs are both promoters and thus do not rely on specific inducible promoters and could drive various cellular responses. It shows that the hrp system has significant potential for building a range of biological parts and devices with good performance and flexibility.

Conference paper

Kitney RI, 2009, Synthetic Biology, ISBN: 9781903496442

Book

Noirhomme Q, Kitney RI, Macq B, 2008, Single-trial EEG source reconstruction for brain-computer interface, IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, Vol: 55, Pages: 1592-1601, ISSN: 0018-9294

Journal article

Kitney RI, Freemont PS, Rouilly V, 2007, Engineering a molecular predation oscillator, IET Synthetic Biology, Vol: 1, Pages: 68-70, ISSN: 1752-1394

The paper addresses the problem of designing and building a stable molecular based oscillator which can be controlled in terms of both amplitude and frequency. A study of previous oscillators of this type showed that they are inherently unstable. To overcome this problem a design was chosen which is based on Lotka-Voltera dynamics. An important aspect of the work was the use of what we term the Engineering Cycle; that is, the cycle of system specification, design, modelling, implementation, and testing and validation. The Lotka-Voltera dynamic, in the context of a predation oscillator, amounts to a predator-prey approach. This is the basis of the oscillator design. The oscillator was designed and detailed modelling undertaken to establish the modes of the dynamic; how it could be tuned for stability; and how to control its amplitude and frequency. The biological implementation of the design was undertaken using a number of BioBricks from the MIT registry (http://parts.mit.edu/registry/ index.php/Main_Page), together with a number of parts which we designed and built. © 2007 The Institution of Engineering and Technology.

Journal article

Delakis I, Hammad O, Kitney RI, 2007, Wavelet-based de-noising algorithm for images acquired with parallel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), PHYSICS IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY, Vol: 52, Pages: 3741-3751, ISSN: 0031-9155

Journal article

Poh C-L, Kitney RI, Shrestha RBK, 2007, Addressing the future of clinical information systems - Web-based multilayer visualization, IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN BIOMEDICINE, Vol: 11, Pages: 127-140, ISSN: 1089-7771

Journal article

Poh C-L, Kitney RI, 2007, Cartilage thickness visualization using 2D WearMaps and TrackBack, 29th Annual International Conference of the IEEE-Engineering-in-Medicine-and-Biology-Society, Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 2883-2886, ISSN: 1094-687X

Conference paper

Kleyn D, Kitney R, Atun RA, 2007, Partnership and innovation in the life sciences, Innovation in the Biopharmaceutical Industry, Pages: 109-134, ISBN: 9789812706607

© 2007 by World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved. Government support for partnering between BioPharma companies and universities is growing in theUKand some European countries but fewstudies have explored these partnerships. Through interviews and a survey of key institutions we explored perceptions of key informants on industry and university partnerships. Study participants identified that partnering helped them to increase innovation in R&D and led them to adopt more open approaches to innovation. Organisational structures to coordinate and support partnerships; flexibility in operational management to solve problems in establishing and running these partnerships; leadership, especially by investigators to champion and lead collaborations; developing organisational capabilities of universities; and creation of an enabling environment by governments were identified as the critical success factors for partnering. The challenges faced were identified as lack of funding for university research teams; pressure on pricing from industry partners; disagreements on IP ownership; asymmetry of industry and university capabilities in partnering; and lack of administrative support with excessive bureaucracy from universities.

Book chapter

Poh CL, Kitney RI, Akhtar S, Alam M, Shrestha Ret al., 2007, Multi-layer biological visualization of cartilage wear, Pages: 214-217, ISSN: 1680-0737

© International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 2007. The paper relates to a project on the development of advanced clinical information systems (CIS). These are capable of storing, displaying and manipulating multiple data types across the Biological Continuum (BC) – the continuum which comprises systems, viscera, tissue, cells, proteins and genes. In this context, we address the issue of multi-layer visualization of cartilage wear at the visceral, tissue and cellular levels. In many areas of application there may be a wide range of image data (both 2-D and 3-D) across the BC. In the treatment of cartilage defects, in addition to the use of minimal access surgical techniques, there have been rapid developments in tissue engineering and cell-based therapy. Imaging at all levels of the BC is important in this context in order to undertake effective diagnosis and to monitor the success of treatment. This is generally achieved using different imaging modalities. There is therefore a need to readily access and view the full range of data. This has required the development of visualization and navigation techniques across the levels. As a result, we have developed a web-based interface which allows the viewing of 2-D and 3-D image data from different levels of the BC seamlessly, despite the fact that the data may well be from different modalities. We will present a case study using porcine cadaver knee specimens which have been used to investigate cartilage wear. A number of objectives have been achieved in the study. (i) Geometrically matched sets of images have been obtained from the visceral, tissue and cellular levels of the BC using different imaging modalities (i.e. MRI, light and electron microscopy); (ii) Cartilage wear has been visualized in a manner that will aid diagnosis; (iii) The geometric framework concept has been demonstrated by visualizing the matched sets of data using our interface.

Conference paper

Poh C-L, Kitney RI, Shrestha RBK, 2007, Web-based Visualization Interface for Knee Cartilage, 11th Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing (MEDICON 2007), Publisher: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN, Pages: 814-+, ISSN: 1680-0737

Conference paper

Chi Y, Kitney RI, Cashman P, 2007, Automatic cartilage detection in MR image sets using CDSG snake, Pages: 2398-2402, ISSN: 1680-0737

© International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering 2007. A new fast algorithm integrates an enhanced general GVF forces with upwind direction constraints and implements a fast directional distance transform outside narrow bands masked over the bone boundaries. The method was evaluated on >100 synthetic and real MR images, including cartilage. We refer to this as the Chessboard Directional Sharpened GVF snake, or CDSG. The algorithm is robust to weak image features and even invisibly contacting boundaries. Compared with the GGVF Snake, our method is more tolerant of disconnected or fuzzy edges and noise; more precise; and nearly 3 times faster. Applying to MR image sets, it uses the achieved detection result of the adjacent slide as the initialization of the current. The numerical solution is built on a level set approach. It supports multiple Snakes and allows effective detection of cartilage thinning.

Conference paper

Poh CL, Kitney RI, Shrestha RBK, 2007, Web-based visualization interface for knee cartilage, Pages: 814-817, ISSN: 1680-0737

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007. Osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee can be described as the degradation and loss of articular cartilage. Adequate visualization of cartilage is paramount in allowing accurate and clinically meaningful assessment of cartilage surface morphology and thickness. In this paper we present a web-based user interface that allows the visualization of quantitative results (i.e., cartilage thickness) derived from MR knee images. The use of web-based technology has allowed greater access to the interface and clinically useful interactive functions for the viewing of data (i.e., cartilage thickness WearMap and MR images).

Conference paper

Kitney RI, 2007, Synthetic biology – Engineering biologically-based devices and systems, Pages: 1138-1139, ISSN: 1680-0737

Conference paper

Kitney RI, 2007, Synthetic Biology - Engineering Biologically-based Devices and Systems, 11th Mediterranean Conference on Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing (MEDICON 2007), Pages: 1138-1139, ISSN: 1680-0737

Conference paper

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