Imperial College London

DrRaviVaidyanathan

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering

Reader in Biomechatronics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7020r.vaidyanathan CV

 
 
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Location

 

717City and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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127 results found

Madgwick SOH, Harrison AJL, Vaidyanathan R, 2011, Estimation of IMU and MARG orientation using a gradient descent algorithm, IEEE International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics (ICORR)/International Neurorehabilitation Symposium (INRS)/International Conference on Virtual Rehabilitation (ICVR), Publisher: IEEE, ISSN: 1945-7898

Conference paper

Lock RJ, Peiris BHPM, Bates S, Burgess SC, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2011, Quantification of the Benefits of a Compliant Foil for Underwater Flapping Wing Propulsion, IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 898-903, ISSN: 2159-6255

Conference paper

Burgess SC, Wang J, Etoundi AC, Vaidyanathan R, Oliver JDet al., 2011, A functional analysis of the jaw mechanism in the sling-jaw wrasse, International Journal of Design and Nature and Ecodynamics, Vol: 6, Pages: 258-271, ISSN: 1755-7437

Sling-jaw wrasse can deploy their mouths forward at high speed to catch prey and collect food. The forward swimming of the fish and the deployment of the jaw mechanism has been simulated using numerical analysis of the equations of motion. Computed tomography and reverse engineering have been used to obtain accurate geometrical and mass data of an actual sling jaw wrasse including the jaw mechanism. The analysis shows that maximum snout acceleration is up to 10.7 g, whereas the maximum fish acceleration is up to 0.25 g, thus showing the advantage of having the deployable snout. The analysis also shows that maximum snout acceleration is highly dependent on the size of the fish. Small fish of 7.5 cm length have a maximum snout acceleration of up to 10.7 g, whereas large fish of 35 cm length have a maximum snout acceleration of up to 5.2 g. The analysis may help to explain why deployable jaws are not seen on fish greater than about 35 cm in length. Hypothetical predator-prey chasing scenarios show that the deployable mouth gives the sling-jaw wrasse a very significant advantage when the prey is in close range. The sling-jaw wrasse demonstrates that linkage mechanisms enable a high degree of optimisation of movement to be achieved in a deployment mechanism. Biomimetic applications of the jaw mechanism are briefly discussed. © 2011 WIT Press.

Journal article

Mace M, Mamun KA, Wang S, Gupta L, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2011, Ensemble classification for robust discrimination of multi-channel , multi-class tongue-movement ear pressure signals, Boston, Proc. of the 33rd IEEE Int. Conf. of Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, Publisher: IEEE

Conference paper

Mace M, Abdullah-Al-Mamun K, Wang S, Gupta L, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2011, Ensemble classification for robust discrimination of multi-channel, multi-class tongue-movement ear pressure signals., Pages: 1733-1736, ISSN: 1557-170X

In this paper we introduce a robust classification framework for tongue-movement ear pressure signals based around an ensemble voting methodology. The ensemble members are comprised of different combinations of sensor inputs i.e. two in-ear microphones and an acoustic gel sensor positioned under the chin of the individual and classification using three different base models. It is shown that by using all nine ensemble members when compared to the individual (base) models, the average misclassification rate can be reduced from 23% to 2.8% when using the majority voting strategy. The correct classification rate is improved from 76% to 92.4% when utilizing either the borda count or condorcet methods. This is achieved through a combination of rejection based on ambiguity in the ensemble and diversity in the misclassified instances across the ensemble members.

Conference paper

Bachmann RJ, Vaidyanathan R, Boria FJ, Pluta J, Kiihne J, Taylor BK, Bledsoe RH, Ifju PG, Quinn RDet al., 2010, A miniature vehicle with extended aerial and terrestrial mobility, Flying Insects and Robots, Pages: 247-270, ISBN: 9783540893929

This chapter describes the design, fabrication, and field testing of a small robot (30.5 cm wingspan and 30.5 cm length) capable of motion in both aerial and terrestrial mediums. The micro-air-land vehicle (MALV) implements abstracted biological inspiration in both flying and walking mechanisms for locomotion and transition between modes of operation. The propeller-driven robot employs an undercambered, chord-wise compliant wing to achieve improved aerial stability over rigid-wing micro-air vehicles (MAVs) of similar size. Flight maneuverability is provided through elevator and rudder control. MALV lands and walks on the ground using an animal-inspired passively compliant wheel-leg running gear that enables the robot to crawl and climb, including surmounting obstacles larger than its own height. Turning is accomplished through differential activation of wheel-legs. The vehicle successfully performs the transition from flight to walking and is able to transition from terrestrial to aerial locomotion by propeller thrust on a smooth horizontal surface or by walking off a vertical surface higher than 6 m. Fabricated of lightweight carbon fiber the ~100 g vehicle is capable of flying, landing, and crawling with a payload exceeding 20% its own mass. To our knowledge MALV is the first successful vehicle at this scale to be capable of both aerial and terrestrial locomotion in real-world terrains and smooth transitions between the two. © 2010 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

Book chapter

Lock RJ, Vaidyanathan R, Burgess SC, Loveless Jet al., 2010, Development of a biologically inspired multi-modal wing model for aerial-aquatic robotic vehicles through empirical and numerical modelling of the common guillemot, Uria aalge, BIOINSPIRATION & BIOMIMETICS, Vol: 5, ISSN: 1748-3182

Journal article

Craig R, Vaidyanathan R, James C, Melhuish Cet al., 2010, Assessment of human response to robot facial expressions through visual evoked potentials, Pages: 647-652

The focus of this work is to investigate and quantify the ability of a humanoid 'hybrid face' robot to effectively convey emotion to a human observer by mapping their physiological (EEG) response to perceived emotional information. Specifically, we examine the event related response during two implicit emotion recognition experiments to determine the modulation of the face-specific N170 brain response component to robot facial expressions. EEG recordings were taken from a range of test subjects observing the BERT2 robot cycle through a range of facial emotions in each emotion recognition experiment. Results from both experiments demonstrate that the stimuli evoke the N170 component and that digital facial expressions with high correlations can be discriminated. Emotional expressions evoke a larger response relative to neutral stimuli, with negative evoking an increased amplitude and latency to positive emotions, and demonstrate that the response to robot facial expressions evoke similar brain activity to that of a human emotions. This study is the first of its nature to investigate and quantify the human physiological response to digital facial expressions as conveyed in real-time by a humanoid robot. ©2010 IEEE.

Conference paper

Evins R, Pointer P, Vaidyanathan R, 2010, Configuration of a genetic algorithm for multi-objective optimisation of solar gain to buildings, Pages: 1327-1328

We report the formulation and implementation of a genetic algorithm to address multi-objective optimisation of solar gain to buildings with the goal of minimising energy consumption and hence limiting carbon emissions. Heuristic optimisation approaches hold significant promise to balance complex tradeoffs in building design; however the unique nature of each building optimization problem limits broader implementation. Parameter selection is very challenging with little or no correlation between different architectural configurations. We address this issue through 'calibration' on smaller scale problems with derivable optimal solutions. Various seeding, selection and fitness options were trialled, as well as different parameter values. The Pareto front of the global solution set was successfully reproduced for the calibration case. Varying climate produced no major change in the nature of the solution; however, building orientation forced reparameterization for an optimal solution. Future work will establish when calibration is useful, and aim to quantify the nature of the solution space.

Conference paper

Araromi OA, Conn AT, Ling CS, Burgess SC, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2010, A novel fabrication set-up for the flexible production of silicone based EAP "artificial muscle" actuators, 5th International Conference on Comparing Design in Nature with Science and Engineering, Publisher: WIT PRESS, Pages: 289-+, ISSN: 1743-3541

Conference paper

Gupta L, Kota S, Murali S, Molfese DL, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2010, A Feature Ranking Strategy to Facilitate Multivariate Signal Classification, IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS MAN AND CYBERNETICS PART C-APPLICATIONS AND REVIEWS, Vol: 40, Pages: 98-108, ISSN: 1094-6977

Journal article

Lock RJ, Vaidyanathan R, Burgess SC, 2010, Development of a Biologically Inspired Multi-Modal Wing Model for Aerial-Aquatic Robotic Vehicles, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 3404-3409, ISSN: 2153-0858

Conference paper

Gupta L, Kota S, Molfese DL, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2010, Diversity-Based Selection of Components for Fusion Classifiers, 32nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering-in-Medicine-and-Biology-Society (EMBC 10), Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 6304-6307, ISSN: 1557-170X

Conference paper

Bazo D, Vaidyanathan R, Lentz A, Melhuish Cet al., 2010, Design and Testing of a Hybrid Expressive Face for a Humanoid Robot, IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 5317-5322, ISSN: 2153-0858

Conference paper

Mace M, Mamun KA, Vaidyanathan R, Wang S, Gupta LAet al., 2010, Real-time Implementation of a Non-invasive Tongue-based Human-Robot Interface, Taipei, Proc. of the 2010 IEEE/RSJ Int. Conf. on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2010), Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 5486-5491

Conference paper

Kota S, Gupta L, Molfese DL, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2009, A Dynamic Channel Selection Strategy for Dense-Array ERP Classification, IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, Vol: 56, Pages: 1040-1051, ISSN: 0018-9294

Journal article

Bachmann RJ, Boria FJ, Vaidyanathan R, Ifju PG, Quinn RDet al., 2009, A biologically inspired micro-vehicle capable of aerial and terrestrial locomotion, MECHANISM AND MACHINE THEORY, Vol: 44, Pages: 513-526, ISSN: 0094-114X

Journal article

Boxerbaum AS, Bachmann RJ, Quinn RD, Harkins RM, Dunbar T, Burgess SC, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2009, Design and testing of a highly mobile insect-inspired autonomous robot in a beach environment, International Journal of Design and Nature and Ecodynamics, Vol: 4, Pages: 319-336, ISSN: 1755-7437

The capability of autonomous platforms to function on beaches and in the ocean surf-zone is critical for a wide range of military and civilian operations. Of particular importance is the ability to navigate autonomously through the rocky terrain, hard-packed moist sand, and loose dry sand characterizing this environment. The study of animal locomotion mechanisms can elucidate specific movement principles that can be applied to address these demands. In this work, we report the design, fabrication, control system development, simulation, and field testing of a biologically inspired autonomous robot for deployment and operation in an ocean beach environment. The robot successfully fuses a range of insect-inspired passive mechanisms with active autonomous control architectures to seamlessly adapt to and traverse through a range of challenging substrates.Field testing establishes the performance of the robot to navigate semi-rugged terrain in the surf-zone environment including soft to hard-packed sand, mild to medium inclines, and rocky terrain. Platform autonomy is shown to be effective for navigation and communication. The fusion of passive mechanisms and active control algorithms results in a robot with mobility comparable to a legged vehicle with a control system of comparable simplicity to a wheeled robot. Based on the success of this platform, we further introduce the design of a fully amphibious robot designed to extend its performance to completely undersea surroundings. © 2009 WIT Press.

Journal article

Lock RJ, Vaidyanathan R, Burgess SC, Quinn RDet al., 2009, Impact of Passive Stiffness Variation on Stability and Mobility of a Hexapod Robot, IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 980-+, ISSN: 2159-6255

Conference paper

Boxerbaum AS, Klein MA, Quinn RBRD, Harkins R, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2009, Design of a Semi-Autonomous Hybrid Mobility Surf-Zone Robot, IEEE/ASME International Conference on Advanced Intelligent Mechatronics, Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 974-+, ISSN: 2159-6255

Conference paper

Burgess SC, Ling CS, Conn A, Araromi S, Wang J, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2009, Development of a novel Electro Active Polymer (EAP) actuator for driving the wings of flapping micro air vehicle, 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Optimum Design of Structures, Publisher: WIT PRESS, Pages: 207-217, ISSN: 1746-4498

Conference paper

Harkins RH, Dunbar T, Boxerbaum AS, Bachmann RJ, Quinn RDet al., 2009, Confluence of Active and Passive Control Mechanisms Enabling Autonomy and Terrain Adaptability for Robots in Variable Environments, International Conference on Advances in Electrical and Electronics Engineering held at the World Congress on Engineering and Computer Sciences, Publisher: IEEE COMPUTER SOC, Pages: 138-+

Conference paper

Bachmann RJ, Vaidyanathan R, Quinn RD, 2009, Drive Train Design Enabling Locomotion Transition of a Small Hybrid Air-Land Vehicle, IEEE RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 5647-+

Conference paper

Mace M, Vaidyanathan R, Wang S, Gupta Let al., 2009, Tongue in cheek: A novel concept in assistive human-machine interface, Journal of Assistive Technologies, Vol: 3, Pages: 14-26

Journal article

Kota S, Mace M, Gupta LA, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2009, A DCT-Gaussian Classification Scheme for Human-Robot Interface, St. Louis, Proc. of the IEEE 2009 Int. Conf. on Intelligent Robots and Systems (IROS 2009), Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 5503-5508

Conference paper

Vaidyanathan R, Prince TS, Modarreszadeh M, Gupta L, Lisy FJet al., 2008, Computationally efficient predictive adaptive control for robotic operation in dynamic environments and task domains, PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERS PART B-JOURNAL OF ENGINEERING MANUFACTURE, Vol: 222, Pages: 1695-1713, ISSN: 0954-4054

Journal article

Gupta L, Kota S, Murali S, Molfese D, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2008, Dimensionality reduction strategies for the design of human machine interface signal classifiers, Pages: 2432-2436, ISSN: 1062-922X

The goal in this paper is to overcome the dimensionality problem related to designing human-machineinterface (HMI) signal classifiers. The dimension is decreased by selecting a small set of linear combination of the input space features using the principal components transform (PCT) and the discrete cosine transform (DCT). Issues dealing with the selection of the basis vectors of the PCT and DCT for multi-class classification problems are addressed and four different classdependant ranking criteria are introduced to select basis vectors from the transformed training vectors in the PCT and DCT domains. The application and evaluation of the resulting PCT and DCT based multivariate classification strategies are demonstrated by classifying ear-pressure signals and event related potentials. The signals in these experiments are typical of control signals used in HMI applications and are also typical of those in which the dimensionality problem occurs. Based on the evaluations and comparisons, it is concluded that the PCT and the DCT based strategies developed in this paper offer viable solutions to overcome the dimensionality problem that frequently plagues the design of practical HMI signal classifiers. © 2008 IEEE.

Conference paper

Kirshenbaum M, Palmer D, McCullick P, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2008, Explaining swarm design concepts using an interactive, bottom-up simulation tool, Pages: 298-303

When promoting emergent behavior as a viable problem-solving option to a community unfamiliar with the concept but nevertheless key stakeholders in the effort, swarm researchers can find themselves making rudimentary analogies to social insects that provide some familiarity, but offers nothing in the way of real understanding. Yet, if these stakeholders are to adopt such a seemingly radical approach, they need to be somewhat conversant with the concepts, the obstacles and the process of an emergent system. We have built an Emergent Behavior Simulation Tool (EBST) to make issues of emergent systems and bottom-up design quickly accessible to interested neophytes. The contextual scenarios are built by swarm researchers, but provide an interface accessible to all. The tool provides an environment in which the consequences of agent based actions can be observed at the global level, and then quickly changed based on observations. Yet the scenarios are specific, and goal-oriented, so that the swarm-layperson is not left to fend for themselves in a sea of syntax, and open-ended possibilities. The tool is the centerpiece of an online course being developed for military students at the US Naval Postgraduate School. © Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2008.

Conference paper

Kovacina MA, Branicky MS, Palmer DW, Vaidyanathan Ret al., 2008, Use of a Mixed Radix Fitness Function to Evolve Swarm Behaviors, IEEE Swarm Intelligence Symposium, Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 304-+

Conference paper

Harkins R, Dunbar T, Boxerbaum AS, Bachman R, Vaidyanathan R, Quinn RDet al., 2008, Design and Testing of an Autonomous Highly Mobile Robot in a Beach Environment, World Congress on Engineering and Computer Science (WCECS 2008), Publisher: INT ASSOC ENGINEERS-IAENG, Pages: 613-618, ISSN: 2078-0958

Conference paper

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