Imperial College London

Dr Shin-Yi Chiou (Chloe)

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Honorary Research Associate
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3313 8833s.chiou12

 
 
//

Location

 

7L16Lab BlockCharing Cross Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Chiou:2016:10.1371/journal.pone.0147650,
author = {Chiou, S-Y and Gottardi, SE and Hodges, PW and Strutton, PH},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pone.0147650},
journal = {PLoS One},
title = {Corticospinal Excitability of Trunk Muscles during Different Postural Tasks},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0147650},
volume = {11},
year = {2016}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Evidence suggests that the primary motor cortex (M1) is involved in both voluntary, goal-directed movements and in postural control. Trunk muscles are involved in both tasks, however, the extent to which M1 controls these muscles in trunk flexion/extension (voluntary movement) and in rapid shoulder flexion (postural control) remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate this question by examining excitability of corticospinal inputs totrunk muscles during voluntary and postural tasks. Twenty healthy adults participated. Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered to the M1 to examine motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the trunk muscles (erector spinae (ES) and rectus abdominis (RA)) during dynamic shoulder flexion (DSF), static shoulder flexion (SSF), and static trunk extension (STE). The level of background muscle activity in the ES muscles was matched across tasks. MEP amplitudes in ES were significantly larger in DSF than in SSF or in STE; however, this was not observed for RA. Further, there were no differences in levels of muscleactivity in RA between tasks. Our findings reveal that corticospinal excitability of the ES muscles appears greater during dynamic anticipatory posture-related adjustments than during static tasks requiring postural (SSF) and goal-directed voluntary (STE) activity. These results suggest that task-oriented rehabilitation of trunk muscles should be considered for optimal transfer of therapeutic effect to function.
AU - Chiou,S-Y
AU - Gottardi,SE
AU - Hodges,PW
AU - Strutton,PH
DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0147650
PY - 2016///
SN - 1932-6203
TI - Corticospinal Excitability of Trunk Muscles during Different Postural Tasks
T2 - PLoS One
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0147650
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/29056
VL - 11
ER -