Imperial College London

ProfessorSanjeevGupta

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Earth Science & Engineering

Professor of Earth Science
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6527s.gupta

 
 
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Location

 

Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

91 results found

Davis JM, Gupta S, Balme M, Grindrod PM, Fawdon P, Dickeson ZI, Williams RMEet al., A Diverse Array of Fluvial Depositional Systems in Arabia Terra: Evidence for mid‐Noachian to Early Hesperian Rivers on Mars, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, ISSN: 2169-9097

Journal article

Stack KM, Grotzinger JP, Lamb MP, Gupta S, Rubin DM, Kah LC, Edgar LA, Fey DM, Hurowitz JA, McBride M, Rivera-Hernández F, Sumner DY, Van Beek JK, Williams RME, Aileen Yingst Ret al., 2019, Evidence for plunging river plume deposits in the Pahrump Hills member of the Murray formation, Gale crater, Mars, Sedimentology, ISSN: 0037-0746

Recent robotic missions to Mars have offered new insights into the extent, diversity and habitability of the Martian sedimentary rock record. Since the Curiosity rover landed in Gale crater in August 2012, the Mars Science Laboratory Science Team has explored the origins and habitability of ancient fluvial, deltaic, lacustrine and aeolian deposits preserved within the crater. This study describes the sedimentology of a ca 13 m thick succession named the Pahrump Hills member of the Murray formation, the first thick fine‐grained deposit discovered in situ on Mars. This work evaluates the depositional processes responsible for its formation and reconstructs its palaeoenvironmental setting. The Pahrump Hills succession can be sub‐divided into four distinct sedimentary facies: (i) thinly laminated mudstone; (ii) low‐angle cross‐stratified mudstone; (iii) cross‐stratified sandstone; and (iv) thickly laminated mudstone–sandstone. The very fine grain size of the mudstone facies and abundant millimetre‐scale and sub‐millimetre‐scale laminations exhibiting quasi‐uniform thickness throughout the Pahrump Hills succession are most consistent with lacustrine deposition. Low‐angle geometric discordances in the mudstone facies are interpreted as ‘scour and drape’ structures and suggest the action of currents, such as those associated with hyperpycnal river‐generated plumes plunging into a lake. Observation of an overall upward coarsening in grain size and thickening of laminae throughout the Pahrump Hills succession is consistent with deposition from basinward progradation of a fluvial‐deltaic system derived from the northern crater rim into the Gale crater lake. Palaeohydraulic modelling constrains the salinity of the ancient lake in Gale crater: assuming river sediment concentrations typical of floods on Earth, plunging river plumes and sedimentary structures like those observed at Pahrump Hills would have required lake densities near freshwater to form. The dep

Journal article

García-Moreno D, Gupta S, Collier JS, Oggioni F, Vanneste K, Trentesaux A, Verbeeck K, Versteeg W, Jomard H, Camelbeeck T, De Batist Met al., 2019, Middle–Late Pleistocene landscape evolution of the Dover Strait inferred from buried and submerged erosional landforms, Quaternary Science Reviews, Vol: 203, Pages: 209-232, ISSN: 0277-3791

Prominent landforms, either buried or preserved at the seafloor, provide important constraints on the processes that led to the opening and present-day configuration of the Dover Strait. Here, we extend previous investigations on two distinct landform features, the Fosse Dangeard and Lobourg Channel, to better understand the poly-phase history of their formation and inferences for the opening and Pleistocene evolution of the Dover Strait. The Fosse Dangeard consist of several interconnected palaeo-depressions. Their morphology and spatial distribution are interpreted to be the result of plunge-pool erosion generated at the base of north-eastward retreating waterfalls. Their infills comprise internal erosional surfaces that provide evidence for the occurrence of several erosional episodes following their initial incision. The Lobourg Channel comprises various sets of erosional features, attesting to the occurrence of several phases of intense fluvial and/or flood erosion. The last one of these carved a prominent inner channel, which truncates the uppermost infill of the Fosse Dangeard. The morphology of the Lobourg inner channel and the erosional features associated with its incision strongly resemble landforms found in megaflood-eroded terrains, indicating that this valley was likely eroded by one or several megafloods. Our study therefore corroborates the existence of waterfalls in the Dover Strait at least once during the Pleistocene Epoch. It also provides evidence of the occurrence of multiple episodes of fluvial and flood erosion, including megafloods. Finally, this study allows us to establish a relative chronology of the erosional/depositional episodes that resulted in the present-day morphology of this region.

Journal article

Peter F, Gupta S, Davis J, Warner N, Adler J, Balme M, Bell III J, Grindrod P, Sefton-Nash Eet al., 2018, The Hypanis Valles delta: The last highstand of a sea on early Mars?, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol: 500, Pages: 225-241, ISSN: 0012-821X

One of the most contentious hypotheses in the geological history of Mars is whether the northern lowlands ever contained an oceanic water body. Arguably, the best evidence for an ocean comes from the presence of sedimentary fans around Mars' dichotomy boundary, which separates the northern lowlands from the southern highlands. Here we describe the palaeogeomorphology of the Hypanis Valles sediment fan, the largest sediment fan complex reported on Mars (area >970 km2). This has an extensive catchment () incorporating Hypanis and Nanedi Valles, that we show was active during the late-Noachian/early-Hesperian period (∼3.7 Ga). The fan comprises a series of lobe-shaped sediment bodies, connected by multiple bifurcating flat-topped ridges. We interpret the latter as former fluvial channel belts now preserved in inverted relief. Meter-scale-thick, sub-horizontal layers that are continuous over tens of kilometres are visible in scarps and the inverted channel margins. The inverted channel branches and lobes are observed to occur up to at least 140 km from the outlet of Hypanis Valles and descend ∼500 m in elevation. The progressive basinward advance of the channellobe transition records deposition and avulsion at the margin of a retreating standing body of water, assuming the elevation of the northern plains basin floor is stable. We interpret the Hypanis sediment fan to represent an ancient delta as opposed to a fluvial fan system. At its location at the dichotomy boundary, the Hypanis Valles fan system is topographically open to Chryse Planitia – an extensive plain that opens in turn into the larger northern lowlands basin. We conclude that the observed progradation of fan bodies was due to basinward shoreline retreat of an ancient body of water which extended across at least Chryse Planitia. Given the open topography, it is plausible that the Hypanis fan system records the existence, last highstand, and retreat of a large sea in Chryse Planitia and perh

Journal article

Davis JM, Grindrod PM, Fawdon P, Williams RME, Gupta S, Balme Met al., 2018, Episodic and declining fluvial processes in southwest Melas Chasma, Valles Marineris, Mars, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol: 123, Pages: 2527-2549, ISSN: 2169-9097

There is abundant evidence for aqueous processes on Noachian terrains across Mars; however, key questions remain about whether these processes continued into the Hesperian as the martian climate became less temperate. One region with an extensive Hesperian sedimentary record is Valles Marineris. We use high‐resolution image and topographic data sets to investigate the fluvial systems in the southwest Melas basin, Valles Marineris, Mars. Fluvial landforms in the basin exist across a wide area, and some are preserved as inverted channels. The stratigraphy of the basin is complex: Fluvial landforms are preserved as planview geomorphic features and are also interbedded with layered deposits in the basin. The fluvial morphologies are consistent with formation by precipitation‐driven runoff. Fluvial processes in the basin were episodic, suggesting multiple wet and dry periods. During dry periods, mantling material accumulated, and significant volumes of sediment were eroded, inverting fluvial channels. During wet periods, inverted channels and mantling material infilling valleys were incised by further fluvial erosion. These trends for episodic fluvial processes are similarly reflected in the central depression of the southwest Melas basin, previously described as a paleolake. Ultimately, fluvial processes in the basin gradually shut down, becoming geographically restricted, and then ceased entirely. We show that branching valley networks are also present on the plateaus above Melas and Ius Chasma, which converge on the heads of tributary canyons. These suggest that precipitation‐driven runoff processes also extended onto the plateaus of Valles Marineris.

Journal article

Barnes R, Gupta S, Traxler C, Ortner T, Bauer A, Hesina G, Paar G, Huber B, Juhart K, Fritz L, Nauschnegg B, Muller J-P, Tao Yet al., 2018, Geological Analysis of Martian Rover-Derived Digital Outcrop Models Using the 3-D Visualization Tool, Planetary Robotics 3-D ViewerPRo3D, EARTH AND SPACE SCIENCE, Vol: 5, Pages: 285-307, ISSN: 2333-5084

Journal article

Eigenbrode JL, Summons RE, Steele A, Freissinet C, Millan M, Navarro-González R, Sutter B, McAdam AC, Franze H, Glavin D, Archer PD, Mahaffy P, Conrad PG, Hurowitz JA, Grotzinger JP, Gupta S, Ming D, Sumner DY, Szopa C, Malespin C, Buch A, Coll Pet al., 2018, Organic matter preserved in 3-Billion-year-old mudstones at Gale Crater, Mars, Science, Vol: 360, Pages: 1096-1101, ISSN: 0036-8075

Establishing the presence and state of organic matter in martian materials, including its possible biosignatures, has been an elusive quest, despite limited reports of organic matter existence. We report the in situdetection of refractory organic matter preserved in lacustrine mudstones at the base of the 3.8-3.1 Ga Murray formation at Pahrump Hills, Gale crater, by the Sample Analysis at Mars instrument suite onboard the Curiosity rover. Diverse pyrolysis products including thiophenic, aromatic, and aliphaticcompoundsreleased at high temperatures (500º-820°C) were directly detected by evolved gas analysis. Thiophenes were also observed by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Their presence suggestssulfurization aided organic matterpreservation. At least 50 nanomolesof organic carbon persist as probable macromolecules having 5% carbonas organic sulfur molecules.

Journal article

Bristow TF, Rampe EB, Achilles CN, Blake DF, Chipera SJ, Craig P, Crisp JA, Des Marais DJ, Downs RT, Gellert R, Grotzinger JP, Gupta S, Hazen RM, Horgan B, Hogancamp JV, Mangold N, Mahaffy PR, McAdam AC, Ming DW, Morookian JM, Morris RV, Morrison SM, Treiman AH, Vaniman DT, Vasavada AR, Yen ASet al., 2018, Clay mineral diversity and abundance in sedimentary rocks of Gale crater, Mars., Science Advances, Vol: 4

Clay minerals provide indicators of the evolution of aqueous conditions and possible habitats for life on ancient Mars. Analyses by the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity show that ~3.5-billion year (Ga) fluvio-lacustrine mudstones in Gale crater contain up to ~28 weight % (wt %) clay minerals. We demonstrate that the species of clay minerals deduced from x-ray diffraction and evolved gas analysis show a strong paleoenvironmental dependency. While perennial lake mudstones are characterized by Fe-saponite, we find that stratigraphic intervals associated with episodic lake drying contain Al-rich, Fe3+-bearing dioctahedral smectite, with minor (3 wt %) quantities of ferripyrophyllite, interpreted as wind-blown detritus, found in candidate aeolian deposits. Our results suggest that dioctahedral smectite formed via near-surface chemical weathering driven by fluctuations in lake level and atmospheric infiltration, a process leading to the redistribution of nutrients and potentially influencing the cycling of gases that help regulate climate.

Journal article

Banham S, Gupta S, Rubin D, Watkins J, Sumner D, Edgett K, Grotzinger J, Lewis K, Edgar L, Stack-Morgan K, Barnes R, Bell III J, Day M, Ewing R, Lapotre M, Stein N, Rivera-Hernandez F, Vasavada Aet al., 2018, Ancient martian aeolian processes and palaeomorphologyreconstructed from the Stimson formation on the lowerslope of Aeolis Mons, Gale crater, Mars, Sedimentology, Vol: 65, Pages: 993-1042, ISSN: 0037-0746

Reconstruction of the palaeoenvironmental context of Martian sedimentary rocks is central to studies of ancient Martian habitability and regional palaeoclimate history. This paper reports the analysis of a distinct aeolian deposit preserved in Gale crater, Mars, and evaluates its palaeomorphology, the processes responsible for its deposition, and its implications for Gale crater geological history and regional palaeoclimate. Whilst exploring the sedimentary succession cropping out on the northern flank of Aeolis Mons, Gale crater, the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity encountered a decametre‐thick sandstone succession, named the Stimson formation, unconformably overlying lacustrine deposits of the Murray formation. The sandstone contains sand grains characterized by high roundness and sphericity, and cross‐bedding on the order of 1 m in thickness, separated by sub‐horizontal bounding surfaces traceable for tens of metres across outcrops. The cross‐beds are composed of uniform thickness cross‐laminations interpreted as wind‐ripple strata. Cross‐sets are separated by sub‐horizontal bounding surfaces traceable for tens of metres across outcrops that are interpreted as dune migration surfaces. Grain characteristics and presence of wind‐ripple strata indicate deposition of the Stimson formation by aeolian processes. The absence of features characteristic of damp or wet aeolian sediment accumulation indicate deposition in a dry aeolian system. Reconstruction of the palaeogeomorphology suggests that the Stimson dune field was composed largely of simple sinuous crescentic dunes with a height of ca 10 m, and wavelengths of ca 150 m, with local development of complex dunes. Analysis of cross‐strata dip azimuths indicates that the general dune migration direction and hence net sediment transport was towards the north‐east. The juxtaposition of a dry aeolian system unconformably above the lacustrine Murray formation represents starkly contrasting palaeoenvironmental and p

Journal article

Grindrod PM, Warner NH, Hobley DEJ, Schwartz C, Gupta Set al., 2018, Stepped fans and facies-equivalent phyllosilicates in Coprates Catena, Mars, Icarus, Vol: 307, Pages: 260-280, ISSN: 0019-1035

Journal article

Stein N, Grotzinger JP, Schieber J, Mangold N, Hallet B, Newsom H, Stack KM, Berger JA, Thompson L, Siebach KL, Cousin A, Le Mouelic S, Minitti M, Sumner DY, Fedo C, House CH, Gupta S, Vasavada AR, Gellert R, Wiens RC, Frydenvang J, Forni O, Meslin PY, Payre V, Dehouck Eet al., 2018, Desiccation cracks provide evidence of lake drying on Mars,Sutton Island member, Murray formation, Gale Crater, Geology, Vol: 46, Pages: 515-518, ISSN: 0091-7613

Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover data are used to describe the morphology of desiccation cracks observed in ancient lacustrine strata at Gale crater, Mars, and to interpret their paleoenvironmental setting. The desiccation cracks indicate subaerial exposure of lacustrine facies in the Sutton Island member of the Murray formation. In association with ripple cross-stratification and possible eolian cross-bedding, these facies indicate a transition from longer-lived perennial lakes recorded by older strata to younger lakes characterized by intermittent exposure. The transition from perennial to episodically exposed lacustrine environments provides evidence for local to regional climate change that can help constrain Mars climate models.

Journal article

Joshi SK, Rai SP, Sinha R, Gupta S, Densmore AL, Rawat YS, Shekhar Set al., 2018, Tracing groundwater recharge sources in the northwestern Indian alluvial aquifer using water isotopes (δ18O, δ2H and 3H), Journal of Hydrology, Vol: 559, Pages: 835-847, ISSN: 0022-1694

Rapid groundwater depletion from the northwestern Indian aquifer system in the western Indo-Gangetic basin has raised serious concerns over the sustainability of groundwater and the livelihoods that depend on it. Sustainable management of this aquifer system requires that we understand the sources and rates of groundwater recharge, however, both these parameters are poorly constrained in this region. Here we analyse the isotopic (δ18O, δ2H and tritium) compositions of groundwater, precipitation, river and canal water to identify the recharge sources, zones of recharge, and groundwater flow in the Ghaggar River basin, which lies between the Himalayan-fed Yamuna and Sutlej River systems in northwestern India. Our results reveal that local precipitation is the main source of groundwater recharge. However, depleted δ18O and δ2H signatures at some sites indicate recharge from canal seepage and irrigation return flow. The spatial variability of δ18O, δ2H, d-excess, and tritium reflects limited lateral connectivity due to the heterogeneous and anisotropic nature of the aquifer system in the study area. The variation of tritium concentration with depth suggests that groundwater above c. 80 mbgl is generally modern water. In contrast, water from below c. 80 mbgl is a mixture of modern and old waters, and indicates longer residence time in comparison to groundwater above c. 80 mbgl. Isotopic signatures of δ18O, δ2H and tritium suggest significant vertical recharge down to a depth of 320 mbgl. The spatial and vertical variations of isotopic signature of groundwater reveal two distinct flow patterns in the aquifer system: (i) local flow (above c.80 mbgl) throughout the study area, and (ii) intermediate and regional flow (below c. 80 mbgl), where water recharges aquifers through large-scale lateral flow as well as vertical infiltration. The understanding of spatial and vertical recharge processes of groundwater in the study area pr

Journal article

Ewing RC, Lapotre MGA, Lewis KW, Day M, Stein N, Rubin DM, Sullivan R, Banham S, Lamb MP, Bridges NT, Gupta S, Fischer WWet al., 2017, Sedimentary processes of the Bagnold Dunes: Implications for the eolian rock record of Mars, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol: 122, Pages: 2544-2573, ISSN: 2169-9097

The Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity visited two active wind-blown sand dunes within Gale crater, Mars, which provided the first ground-based opportunity to compare Martian and terrestrial eolian dune sedimentary processes and study a modern analog for the Martian eolian rock record. Orbital and rover images of these dunes reveal terrestrial-like and uniquely Martian processes. The presence of grainfall, grainflow, and impact ripples resembled terrestrial dunes. Impact ripples were present on all dune slopes and had a size and shape similar to their terrestrial counterpart. Grainfall and grainflow occurred on dune and large-ripple lee slopes. Lee slopes were ~29° where grainflows were present and ~33° where grainfall was present. These slopes are interpreted as the dynamic and static angles of repose, respectively. Grain size measured on an undisturbed impact ripple ranges between 50 μm and 350 μm with an intermediate axis mean size of 113 μm (median: 103 μm). Dissimilar to dune eolian processes on Earth, large, meter-scale ripples were present on all dune slopes. Large ripples had nearly symmetric to strongly asymmetric topographic profiles and heights ranging between 12 cm and 28 cm. The composite observations of the modern sedimentary processes highlight that the Martian eolian rock record is likely different from its terrestrial counterpart because of the large ripples, which are expected to engender a unique scale of cross stratification. More broadly, however, in the Bagnold Dune Field as on Earth, dune-field pattern dynamics and basin-scale boundary conditions will dictate the style and distribution of sedimentary processes.

Journal article

Gupta S, Singh A, Thomsen KJ, Sinha R, Buylaert JP, Carter A, Mark DF, Mason PJ, Densmore AL, Murray AS, Jain M, Paul Det al., 2017, Counter-intuitive influence of Himalayan river morphodynamics on Indus Civilisation urban settlements, Nature Communications, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2041-1723

Urbanism in the Bronze-age Indus Civilisation (~4.6–3.9 thousand years before the present, ka) has been linked to water resources provided by large Himalayan river systems, although the largest concentrations of urban-scale Indus settlements are located far from extant Himalayan rivers. Here we analyse the sedimentary architecture, chronology and provenance of a major palaeochannel associated with many of these settlements. We show that the palaeochannel is a former course of the Sutlej River, the third largest of the present-day Himalayan rivers. Using optically stimulated luminescence dating of sand grains, we demonstrate that flow of the Sutlej in this course terminated considerably earlier than Indus occupation, with diversion to its present course complete shortly after ~8 ka. Indus urban settlements thus developed along an abandoned river valley rather than an active Himalayan river. Confinement of the Sutlej to its present incised course after ~8 ka likely reduced its propensity to re-route frequently thus enabling long-term stability for Indus settlements sited along the relict palaeochannel.

Journal article

Mark C, Chew D, Gupta S, 2017, Does slab-window opening cause uplift of the overriding plate? A case study from the Gulf of California, TECTONOPHYSICS, Vol: 719, Pages: 162-175, ISSN: 0040-1951

Journal article

Durcan JA, Thomas DSG, Gupta S, Pawar V, Singh RN, Petrie CAet al., 2017, Holocene landscape dynamics in the Ghaggar-Hakra palaeochannel region at the northern edge of the Thar Desert, northwest India, Quaternary International, ISSN: 1040-6182

Precession-forced change in insolation has driven de-intensification of the Asian Monsoon systems during the Holocene. Set against this backdrop of a weakening monsoon, Indus Civilisation populations occupied a number of urban settlements on the Ghaggar-Hakra plains during the mid-Holocene from 4.5 ka until they were abandoned by around 3.9 ka. Regional climatic variability has long been cited as a potential factor in the transformation of Indus society, however there remain substantial gaps in the chronological framework for regional climatic and environmental change at the northern margin of the Thar Desert. This makes establishing a link between climate, environment and society challenging. This paper presents 24 optically stimulated luminescence ages from a mixture of 11 fluvial and aeolian sedimentological sites on the Ghaggar-Hakra floodplain/interfluve, an area which was apparently densely populated during the Indus urban phase and subsequently. These ages identify fluvial deposition which mostly pre-dates 5 ka, although fluvial deposits are detected in the Ghaggar palaeochannel at 3.8 ka and 3.0 ka, post-dating the decline of urbanism. Aeolian accumulation phases occur around 9 ka, 6.5 ka, 2.8 ka and 1.7 ka. There is no clear link to a 4.2 ka abrupt climate event, nor is there a simple switch between dominant fluvial deposition and aeolian accumulation, and instead the OSL ages reported present a view of a highly dynamic geomorphic system during the Holocene. The decline of Indus urbanism was not spatially or temporally instantaneous, and this paper suggests that the same can be said for the geomorphic response of the northern Thar to regional climate change.

Journal article

Davies NS, Gibling MR, McMahon WJ, Slater BJ, Long DGF, Bashforth AR, Berry CM, Falcon-Lang HJ, Gupta S, Rygel MC, Wellman CHet al., 2017, Discussion on 'Tectonic and environmental controls on Palaeozoic fluvial environments: reassessing the impacts of early land plants on sedimentation' Journal of the Geological Society, London, JOURNAL OF THE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY, Vol: 174, Pages: 947-950, ISSN: 0016-7649

Journal article

Edgar L, Gupta S, Rubin DM, Lewis KW, Kocurek GA, Anderson RB, Bell JF, Dromart G, Edgett KS, Grotzinger JP, Hardgrove C, Kah LC, Leveille R, Malin MC, Mangold N, Milliken RE, Minitti M, Palucis M, Rice M, Rowland SK, Schieber J, Stack KM, Summer DY, Wiens RC, Williams RME, Williams AJet al., 2017, Shaler: in situ analysis of a fluvial sedimentary deposit on Mars, Sedimentology, Vol: 65, Pages: 96-122, ISSN: 1365-3091

This paper characterises the detailed sedimentology of a fluvial sandbody on Mars for the first time, and interprets its depositional processes and palaeoenvironmental setting. Despite numerous orbital observations of fluvial landforms on the surface of Mars, ground-based characterisation of the sedimentology of such fluvial deposits has not previously been possible. Results from NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover provide an opportunity to reconstruct at fine scale the sedimentary architecture and palaeomorphology of a fluvial environment on Mars. This work describes the grain size, texture, and sedimentary facies of the Shaler outcrop, reconstructs the bedding architecture, and analyses cross-stratification to determine palaeocurrents. On the basis of bedset geometry and inclination, grain-size distribution, and bedform migration direction, this study concludes that the Shaler outcrop likely records the accretion of a fluvial barform. The majority of the outcrop consists of large-scale trough cross-bedding of coarse sand and granules. Palaeocurrent analyses and bedform reconstruction indicate that the beds were deposited by bedforms that migrated towards the northeast, across the surface of a bar that migrated southeast. Stacked cosets of dune cross-bedding suggest aggradation of multiple bedforms, which provides evidence for short periods of sustained flow during Shaler deposition. However, local evidence for aeolian reworking and the presence of potential desiccation cracks within the outcrop suggests that fluvial deposition may have been intermittent. The uppermost strata at Shaler are distinct in terms of texture and chemistry, and are inferred to record deposition from a different sediment dispersal system with a contrasting provenance. The outcrop as a whole is a testament to the availability of liquid water on the surface of Mars in its early history.

Journal article

Hurowitz JA, Grotzinger JP, Fischer WW, McLennan SM, Milliken RE, Stein N, Vasavada AR, Blake DF, Dehouck E, Eigenbrode JL, Fairen AG, Frydenvang J, Gellert R, Grant JA, Gupta S, Herkenhoff KE, Ming DW, Rampe EB, Schmidt ME, Siebach KL, Stack-Morgan K, Sumner DY, Wiens RCet al., 2017, Redox stratification of an ancient lake in Gale crater, Mars, Science, Vol: 356, ISSN: 0036-8075

Gale crater on Mars was once a lake fed by rivers and groundwater. Hurowitz et al. analyzed 3.5 years of data from the Curiosity rover’s exploration of Gale crater to determine the chemical conditions in the ancient lake. Close to the surface, there were plenty of oxidizing agents and rocks formed from large, dense grains, whereas the deeper layers had more reducing agents and were formed from finer material. This redox stratification led to very different environments in different layers, which provides evidence for Martian climate change. The results will aid our understanding of where and when Mars was once habitable.

Journal article

Coates AJ, Jaumann R, Griffiths AD, Leff CE, Schmitz N, Josset J-L, Paar G, Gunn M, Hauber E, Cousins CR, Cross RE, Grindrod P, Bridges JC, Balme M, Gupta S, Crawford IA, Irwin P, Stabbins R, Tirsch D, Vago JL, Theodorou T, Caballo-Perucha M, Osinski GRet al., 2017, The PanCam Instrument for the ExoMars Rover, Astrobiology, Vol: 17, Pages: 511-541, ISSN: 1531-1074

The scientific objectives of the ExoMars rover are designed to answer several key questions in the search for life on Mars. In particular, the unique subsurface drill will address some of these, such as the possible existence and stability of subsurface organics. PanCam will establish the surface geological and morphological context for the mission, working in collaboration with other context instruments. Here, we describe the PanCam scientific objectives in geology, atmospheric science, and 3-D vision. We discuss the design of PanCam, which includes a stereo pair of Wide Angle Cameras (WACs), each of which has an 11-position filter wheel and a High Resolution Camera (HRC) for high-resolution investigations of rock texture at a distance. The cameras and electronics are housed in an optical bench that provides the mechanical interface to the rover mast and a planetary protection barrier. The electronic interface is via the PanCam Interface Unit (PIU), and power conditioning is via a DC-DC converter. PanCam also includes a calibration target mounted on the rover deck for radiometric calibration, fiducial markers for geometric calibration, and a rover inspection mirror. Key Words: Mars—ExoMars—Instrumentation—Geology—Atmosphere—Exobiology—Context. Astrobiology 17, 511–541.

Journal article

Frydenvang J, Gasda PJ, Hurowitz JA, Grotzinger JP, Wiens RC, Newsom HE, Edgett KS, Watkins J, Bridges JC, Maurice S, Fisk MR, Johnson JR, Rapin W, Stein NT, Clegg SM, Schwenzer SP, Bedford CC, Edwards P, Mangold N, Cousin A, Anderson RB, Payre V, Vaniman D, Blake DF, Lanza NL, Gupta S, Van Beek J, Sautter V, Meslin P-Y, Rice M, Milliken R, Gellert R, Thompson L, Clark BC, Sumner DY, Fraeman AA, Kinch KM, Madsen MB, Mitrofanov IG, Jun I, Calef F, Vasavada ARet al., 2017, Diagenetic silica enrichment and late-stage groundwater activity in Gale crater, Mars, GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, Vol: 44, Pages: 4716-4724, ISSN: 0094-8276

Journal article

Rampe EB, Ming DW, Blake DF, Bristow TF, Chipera SJ, Grotzinger JP, Morris RV, Morrison SM, Vaniman DT, Yen AS, Achilles CN, Craig PI, Marais DJD, Downs RT, Farmer JD, Fendrich KV, Gellert R, Hazen RM, Kah LC, Morookianh JM, Peretyazhko TS, Sarrazin P, Treiman AH, Berger JA, Eigenbrode J, Fairen AG, Forni O, Gupta S, Hurowitz JA, Lanza NL, Schmidt ME, Siebach K, Sutter B, Thompson LMet al., 2017, Mineralogy of an ancient lacustrine mudstone succession from the Murray formation, Gale crater, Mars, EARTH AND PLANETARY SCIENCE LETTERS, Vol: 471, Pages: 172-185, ISSN: 0012-821X

The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover has been traversing strata at the base of Aeolis Mons (informally known as Mount Sharp) since September 2014. The Murray formation makes up the lowest exposed strata of the Mount Sharp group and is composed primarily of finely laminated lacustrine mudstone intercalated with rare crossbedded sandstone that is prodeltaic or fluvial in origin. We report on the first three drilled samples from the Murray formation, measured in the Pahrump Hills section. Rietveld refinements and FULLPAT full pattern fitting analyses of X-ray diffraction patterns measured by the MSL CheMin instrument provide mineral abundances, refined unit-cell parameters for major phases giving crystal chemistry, and abundances of X-ray amorphous materials. Our results from the samples measured at the Pahrump Hills and previously published results on the Buckskin sample measured from the Marias Pass section stratigraphically above Pahrump Hills show stratigraphic variations in the mineralogy; phyllosilicates, hematite, jarosite, and pyroxene are most abundant at the base of the Pahrump Hills, and crystalline and amorphous silica and magnetite become prevalent higher in the succession. Some trace element abundances measured by APXS also show stratigraphic trends; Zn and Ni are highly enriched with respect to average Mars crust at the base of the Pahrump Hills (by 7.7 and 3.7 times, respectively), and gradually decrease in abundance in stratigraphically higher regions near Marias Pass, where they are depleted with respect to average Mars crust (by more than an order of magnitude in some targets). The Mn stratigraphic trend is analogous to Zn and Ni, however, Mn abundances are close to those of average Mars crust at the base of Pahrump Hills, rather than being enriched, and Mn becomes increasingly depleted moving upsection. Minerals at the base of the Pahrump Hills, in particular jarosite and hematite, as well as enrichments in Zn, Ni, and Mn, are products of aci

Journal article

Morgan LE, Munk M, Davidheiser-Kroll B, Warner NH, Gupta S, Slaybaugh R, Harkness P, Mark DFet al., 2017, Instrumentation Development for In Situ 40Ar/39Ar Planetary Geochronology, Geostandards and Geoanalytical Research, Vol: 41, Pages: 381-396, ISSN: 1639-4488

The chronology of the Solar System, particularly the timing of formation of extra-terrestrial bodies and their features, is an outstanding problem in planetary science. Although various chronological methods for in situ geochronology have been proposed (e.g., Rb-Sr, K-Ar), and even applied (K-Ar), the reliability, accuracy, and applicability of the 40Ar/39Ar method makes it by far the most desirable chronometer for dating extra-terrestrial bodies. The method however relies on the neutron irradiation of samples, and thus a neutron source. Herein, we discuss the challenges and feasibility of deploying a passive neutron source to planetary surfaces for the in situ application of the 40Ar/39Ar chronometer. Requirements in generating and shielding neutrons, as well as analysing samples are described, along with an exploration of limitations such as mass, power and cost. Two potential solutions for the in situ extra-terrestrial deployment of the 40Ar/39Ar method are presented. Although this represents a challenging task, developing the technology to apply the 40Ar/39Ar method on planetary surfaces would represent a major advance towards constraining the timescale of solar system formation and evolution.

Journal article

Gupta S, Collier JS, Garcia-Moreno D, Oggioni F, Trentesaux A, Vanneste K, De Batist M, Camelbeeck T, Potter G, Van Vliet Lanoe B, Arthur JCRet al., 2017, Two-stage opening of the Dover Strait and the origin of island Britain, Nature Communications, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2041-1723

Late Quaternary separation of Britain from mainland Europe is considered to be a consequence of spillover of a large proglacial lake in the Southern North Sea basin. Lake spillover is inferred to have caused breaching of a rock ridge at the Dover Strait, although this hypothesis remains untested. Here we show that opening of the Strait involved at least two major episodes of erosion. Sub-bottom records reveal a remarkable set of sediment-infilled depressions that are deeply incised into bedrock that we interpret as giant plunge pools. These support a model of initial erosion of the Dover Strait by lake overspill, plunge pool erosion by waterfalls and subsequent dam breaching. Cross-cutting of these landforms by a prominent bedrock-eroded valley that is characterised by features associated with catastrophic flooding indicates final breaching of the Strait by high-magnitude flows. These events set-up conditions for island Britain during sea-level highstands and caused large-scale re-routing of NW European drainage.

Journal article

Rice MS, Gupta S, Treiman AH, Stack KM, Calef F, Edgar LA, Grotzinger J, Lanza N, Le Deit L, Lasue J, Siebach KL, Vasavada A, Wiens RC, Williams Jet al., 2017, Geologic overview of the Mars Science Laboratory rover mission at the Kimberley, Gale crater, Mars, Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets, Vol: 122, Pages: 2-20, ISSN: 2169-9097

The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover completed a detailed investigation at the Kimberley waypoint within Gale crater from sols 571–634 using its full science instrument payload. From orbital images examined early in the Curiosity mission, the Kimberley region had been identified as a high-priority science target based on its clear stratigraphic relationships in a layered sedimentary sequence that had been exposed by differential erosion. Observations of the stratigraphic sequence at the Kimberley made by Curiosity are consistent with deposition in a prograding, fluvio-deltaic system during the late Noachian to early Hesperian, prior to the existence of most of Mount Sharp. Geochemical and mineralogic analyses suggest that sediment deposition likely took place under cold conditions with relatively low water-to-rock ratios. Based on elevated K2O abundances throughout the Kimberley formation, an alkali feldspar protolith is likely one of several igneous sources from which the sediments were derived. After deposition, the rocks underwent multiple episodes of diagenetic alteration with different aqueous chemistries and redox conditions, as evidenced by the presence of Ca-sulfate veins, Mn-oxide fracture fills, and erosion-resistant nodules. More recently, the Kimberley has been subject to significant aeolian abrasion and removal of sediments to create modern topography that slopes away from Mount Sharp, a process that has continued to the present day.

Journal article

jordan OD, Gupta S, Hampson GJ, johnson HDet al., 2016, Preserved stratigraphic architecture and evolution of a net-transgressive mixed wave- and tide-influenced coastal system: Cliff House Sandstone, northwestern New Mexico, USA, Journal of Sedimentary Research, Vol: 86, Pages: 1399-1424, ISSN: 1527-1404

The Cretaceous Cliff House Sandstone comprises a thick (400 m) net-transgressive succession representing a mixed wave- and tide-influenced shallow-marine system that migrated episodically landwards. This study examines the youngest part (middle Campanian) of the Cliff House Sandstone, exposed in Chaco Cultural Natural Historical Park, northwest New Mexico, U.S.A. Detailed mapping of facies architecture between a three-dimensional network of measured sections has allowed the character, geometry, and distribution of key stratigraphic surfaces and stratal units to be reconstructed. Upward-shallowing facies successions (parasequences) are separated by laterally extensive transgressive erosion (ravinement) surfaces cut by both wave and tide processes. Preservation of facies tracts in each parasequence is controlled by the depth of erosion and migration trajectory of the overlying ravinement surfaces. In most parasequences, there is no preservation of the proximal wave-dominated facies tracts (foreshore, upper-shoreface), resulting in thin (4–7 m) top-truncated packages. Four distinct shallow marine tongues (parasequence sets) have been identified, consisting of ten parasequences with a total stratigraphic thickness of ~ 100 m. Each tongue records an episode of complex shoreline migration history (multiple regressive–transgressive phases) in an overall net-transgressive system. The ravinement surfaces provide a stratigraphic framework in which to understand partitioning of tide- and wave-dominated deposits in a net-transgressive system, and a model is presented to account for the sediment distribution and stratigraphic architecture observed in each parasequence. Despite a complex internal architecture, parasequences exhibit a predictable pattern which can be related to the regressive and transgressive phases of deposition. Preservation of wave-dominated facies tracts is associated with shoreline regression, while tide-dominated facies tracts are interpreted to

Journal article

Schieber J, Bish D, Coleman M, Reed M, Hausrath EM, Cosgrove J, Gupta S, Minitti ME, Edgett KS, Malin Met al., 2016, Encounters with an unearthly mudstone: Understanding thefirst mudstone found on Mars, Sedimentology, Vol: 64, Pages: 311-358, ISSN: 1365-3091

The Sheepbed mudstone forms the base of the strata examined by the Curiosity rover in Gale Crater on Mars, and is the first bona fide mudstone known on another planet. From images and associated data, this contribution proposes a holistic interpretation of depositional regime, diagenesis and burial history. A lake basin probably received sediment pulses from alluvial fans. Bed cross-sections show millimetre to centimetre-scale layering due to distal pulses of fluvial sediment injections (fine-grained hyperpycnites), fall-out from river plumes, and some aeolian supply. Diagenetic features include mineralized synaeresis cracks and millimetre-scale nodules, as well as stratiform cementation. Clay minerals were initially considered due to in situ alteration, but bulk rock chemistry and mineralogy suggests that sediments were derived from variably weathered source rocks that probably contained pre-existing clay minerals. X-ray diffraction analyses show contrasting clay mineralogy in closely spaced samples, consistent with at least partial detrital supply of clay minerals. A significant (ca 30 wt%) amorphous component is consistent with little post-depositional alteration. Theoretical modelling of diagenetic reactions, as well as kinetic considerations, suggest that the bulk of diagenetic clay mineral formation occurred comparatively late in diagenesis. Diagenetic features (synaeresis cracks and nodules) were previously thought to reflect early diagenetic gas formation, but an alternative scenario of synaeresis crack formation via fabric collapse of flocculated clays appears more likely. The observed diagenetic features, such as solid nodules, hollow nodules, matrix cement and ‘raised ridges’ (synaeresis cracks) can be explained with progressive alteration of olivine/glass in conjunction with centrifugal and counter diffusion of reactive species. Anhydrite-filled fractures in the Sheepbed mudstone occurred late in diagenesis when fluid pressures built up to ex

Journal article

Davis JM, Balme M, Grindrod PM, Williams RME, Gupta Set al., 2016, Extensive Noachian fluvial systems in Arabia Terra: Implications for early Martian climate, Geology, Vol: 44, Pages: 847-850, ISSN: 1943-2682

Valley networks are some of the strongest lines of evidence for extensive fluvial activity on early (Noachian; >3.7 Ga) Mars. However, their purported absence on certain ancient terrains, such as Arabia Terra, is at variance with patterns of precipitation as predicted by “warm and wet” climate models. This disagreement has contributed to the development of an alternative “icy highlands” scenario, whereby valley networks were formed by the melting of highland ice sheets. Here, we show through regional mapping that Arabia Terra shows evidence for extensive networks of sinuous ridges. We interpret these ridge features as inverted fluvial channels that formed in the Noachian, before being subject to burial and exhumation. The inverted channels developed on extensive aggrading flood plains. As the inverted channels are both sourced in, and traverse across, Arabia Terra, their formation is inconsistent with discrete, localized sources of water, such as meltwater from highland ice sheets. Our results are instead more consistent with an early Mars that supported widespread precipitation and runoff.

Journal article

Carrapa B, Di Giulio A, Mancin N, Stockli D, Fantoni R, Hughes A, Gupta Set al., 2016, Tectonic significance of Cenozoic exhumation and foreland basin evolution in the Western Alps, TECTONICS, Vol: 35, Pages: 1892-1912, ISSN: 0278-7407

Journal article

Lapotre MG, Ewing RC, Lamb MP, Fischer WW, Grotzinger JP, Rubin DM, Lewis KW, Ballard MJ, Day M, Gupta S, Banham SG, Bridges NT, Des Marais DJ, Fraeman AA, Grant JA, Herkenhoff KE, Ming DW, Mischna MA, Rice MS, Sumner DA, Vasavada AR, Yingst RAet al., 2016, Large wind ripples on Mars: a record of atmospheric evolution, Science, Vol: 353, Pages: 55-58, ISSN: 1095-9203

Wind blowing over sand on Earth produces decimeter-wavelength ripples and hundred-meter- to kilometer-wavelength dunes: bedforms of two distinct size modes. Observations from the Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover and the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter reveal that Mars hosts a third stable wind-driven bedform, with meter-scale wavelengths. These bedforms are spatially uniform in size and typically have asymmetric profiles with angle-of-repose lee slopes and sinuous crest lines, making them unlike terrestrial wind ripples. Rather, these structures resemble fluid-drag ripples, which on Earth include water-worked current ripples, but on Mars instead form by wind because of the higher kinematic viscosity of the low-density atmosphere. A reevaluation of the wind-deposited strata in the Burns formation (about 3.7 billion years old or younger) identifies potential wind-drag ripple stratification formed under a thin atmosphere.

Journal article

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