Imperial College London

ProfessorSebastianJohnston

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Asthma UK Clinical Chair
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3764s.johnston

 
 
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Assistant

 

Mr Christophe Tytgat +44 (0)20 7594 3849

 
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Location

 

343Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

470 results found

Stanciu LA, Cho SH, Lau LCK, Begishivili B, Roberts K, Johnston SLet al., 1999, Repeated TCR/CD3 stimulation in the presence of IL-4 increases IL-5, IL-13 and IL-10 production by CD8(+) T cells from atopic asthmatic subjects., Publisher: MOSBY-YEAR BOOK INC, Pages: S205-S205, ISSN: 0091-6749

CONFERENCE PAPER

Legg JP, Warner JA, Johnston SL, Warner JOet al., 1999, Nasal cytokine profiles in bronchiolitis and upper respiratory tract infection secondary to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection., JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 103, Pages: S59-S59, ISSN: 0091-6749

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Biscione GL, Johnston SL, 1999, Chlamydia pneumoniae infections in children, Chlamydia pneumoniae the lung and heart, Editors: Allegra, Blasi, Milano, Publisher: Springer-Verlag Italia, Pages: 197-203

BOOK CHAPTER

Papadopoulos NG, Johnston SL, 1999, The acute exacerbation of asthma:pathogenesis, Difficult asthma, Editors: HA, Fabbri, London, Publisher: Martin Dunitz, Pages: 183-204

BOOK CHAPTER

Papadopoulos NG, Johnston SL, 1999, Rhinoviruses, Principles and Practice of Clinical Virology Fourth Edition, Editors: Zuckerman, Banatvala, Pattison, UK, Publisher: John Wiley & Son, Pages: 329-343

BOOK CHAPTER

Busse WW, Johnston SL, 1999, Triggers of asthma: viruses, An atlas of asthma, Editors: Djukanovic, Holgate, London, Publisher: Parthenon Publishing Group, Pages: 63-68

BOOK CHAPTER

Thomas LH, Papi A, Johnston SL, Warner Jet al., 1997, Effects of epithelial cell supernatants (ECS) on leukocyte function., Publisher: MOSBY-YEAR BOOK INC, Pages: 510-510, ISSN: 0091-6749

CONFERENCE PAPER

Frew AJ, Bradding P, Johnston SL, Lackie P, Semper A, Shute A, Walls AF, Holgate STet al., 1997, Allergy, Mechanisms of Disease, Editors: Tomlinson, Heagerty, Weetman, UK, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Pages: 129-159

BOOK CHAPTER

Johnston SL, Pattemore PK, Sanderson G, Smith S, Campbell MJ, Josephs LK, Cunningham A, Robinson BS, Myint SH, Ward ME, Tyrrell DAJ, Holgate STet al., 1996, The relationship between upper respiratory infections and hospital admissions for asthma: A time-trend analysis, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, Vol: 154, Pages: 654-660, ISSN: 1073-449X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Johnston SL, 1996, Cromolyns: treatment for the common cold., Clin Exp Allergy, Vol: 26, Pages: 989-994, ISSN: 0954-7894

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Rajakulasingam K, Johnston SL, Ducey J, Ritter W, Howarth PH, Holgate STet al., 1996, Effect of thromboxane A(2)-receptor antagonist on bradykinin-induced bronchoconstriction in asthma, JOURNAL OF APPLIED PHYSIOLOGY, Vol: 80, Pages: 1973-1977, ISSN: 8750-7587

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Lindsay MA, Daniels I, Fletcher J, 1996, Investigation of the role of protein kinase C and tyrosine kinases during the rapid and sustained release of superoxide from adherent human neutrophils., Biochem Soc Trans, Vol: 24, ISSN: 0300-5127

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Johnston SL, 1996, Viral infections in children with existing asthma, From Genetics to Quality of Life, Editors: Chanez, Bousquet, Michel, Godard, Publisher: Hogrefe & Huber Pubs, Pages: 102-107

BOOK CHAPTER

Johnston SL, Holgate ST, 1996, Epidemiology of respiratory tract infections, Viral and other infections of the human respiratory tract, Editors: Myint, Taylor-Robinson, London, Publisher: Chapman & Hall, Pages: 1-38

BOOK CHAPTER

JOHNSTON SL, PATTEMORE PK, SANDERSON G, SMITH S, LAMPE F, JOSEPHS L, SYMINGTON P, OTOOLE S, MYINT SH, TYRRELL DAJ, HOLGATE STet al., 1995, COMMUNITY STUDY OF ROLE OF VIRAL-INFECTIONS IN EXACERBATIONS OF ASTHMA IN 9-11 YEAR-OLD CHILDREN, BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 310, Pages: 1225-1229, ISSN: 0959-8138

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Johnston SL, Tyrrell DAJ, 1995, Rhinoviruses, Diagnostic procedures for viral, rickettsial and chlamydial infections, Editors: Lennette, Schmidt, Washington DC, Publisher: American Public Health Association, Pages: 553-563

BOOK CHAPTER

Johnston SL, Dalal A, Mason S, Wilson JW, Robinson BS, Holgate STet al., 1994, Detection of respiratory syncytial virus infection in nasal aspirate samples by flow cytometry., Clin Diagn Virol, Vol: 2, Pages: 279-289, ISSN: 0928-0197

HYPOTHESES: (i) Flow cytometry has the potential for rapid detection of respiratory viral antigens. (ii) This technique can be applied to viral diagnosis in clinical samples. OBJECTIVES AND STUDY DESIGN: (i) To study the identification of six common respiratory viral pathogens by flow cytometry, in virus infected and uninfected cultured cells, as models of positive and negative clinical samples. (ii) To compare flow cytometry with the established techniques of viral isolation and immunofluorescent microscopy in the diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus infection in 68 naso-pharyngeal aspirates taken from children and sent to the virology laboratory for routine virological diagnosis. RESULTS: (i) For each virus analysed, populations of infected and non-infected cells were clearly discernable, confirming potential for this method in rapid viral diagnosis in clinical samples. (ii) Two definitions were employed for a sample to be positive by flow cytometry, these were compared with the combined established techniques. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of flow cytometry were 41%, 98%, 92% and 71% for the first definition and 74%, 88%, 80% and 84% for the second definition respectively. CONCLUSIONS: As tested in this study, flow cytometry is less sensitive than established techniques as well as recently developed rapid diagnostic techniques for the diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus infection. Further evaluation of the potential of flow cytometry in rapid viral diagnosis is warranted.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cunningham A, Johnston SL, Julious S, Ward Met al., 1994, The role of chlamydia pneumoniae and other pathogens in acute episodes of asthma, Proceedings of the Eighth Symposium on Human Chlamydia Infections, Editors: Orfilla, Pages: 480-484

BOOK CHAPTER

JOHNSTON SL, SANDERSON G, PATTEMORE PK, SMITH S, BARDIN PG, BRUCE CB, LAMBDEN PR, TYRRELL DAJ, HOLGATE STet al., 1993, USE OF POLYMERASE CHAIN-REACTION FOR DIAGNOSIS OF PICORNAVIRUS INFECTION IN SUBJECTS WITH AND WITHOUT RESPIRATORY SYMPTOMS, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MICROBIOLOGY, Vol: 31, Pages: 111-117, ISSN: 0095-1137

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Johnston SL, Bradding P, Watkins J, 1991, A simultaneous, noninvasive comparison with sinus rhythm, of two activity sensing, rate adaptive pacemakers, in an elderly population., Pacing Clin Electrophysiol, Vol: 14, Pages: 20-27, ISSN: 0147-8389

We compared the rate response to low level work, arm exercise, step testing, and treadmill exercise between the Siemens Sensolog 703 S (Sg) and the Medtronic Activitrax (Ax) pacemakers, and simultaneous sinus rhythm (SR) in an elderly population. In ten subjects mean age 70.6 years, range 49-81 years, the pacemaker responses were noninvasively compared by strapping the units to the chest wall under constant and equal pressure applied by an adjustable belt. Pacemaker rates and SR were recorded simultaneously on a three-channel ECG recorder. The units were programmed in situ to give an increase in rate from 70 beats/min sitting, to 100 beats/min after walking at a normal pace for 30 seconds. Programming took three times longer for Sg (P less than 0.02). The response to standing and bending was poor for both units (Ax mean 75.7 beats/min, Sg mean 77.6 beats/min), when compared to SR (mean 90.3 beats/min). A 20-step test resulted in a greater rate response from Ax (mean 105.3 beats/min) than from Sg (mean 96.3 beats/min [P = 0.09]), though both were still less than SR (116.3). There were significant differences between the two pacemakers on treadmill testing, at peak rate achieved (Ax mean 112.5 beats/min; Sg mean 102.7 beats/min [P less than 0.005], SR mean 122.5 beats/min) and at end exercise (Ax mean 112.5 beats/min; Sg mean 92.9 beats/min [P less than 0.002], SR mean 121.3 beats/min). Arm exercise, however, resulted in a significantly greater response from Sg than Ax (105.1 and 88.5 beats/min, respectively; P less than 0.01, SR 98.7 beats/min).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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