Imperial College London

Dr Samraat Pawar

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2213s.pawar CV

 
 
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Location

 

2.4KennedySilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

33 results found

Bestion E, Garcia-Carreras B, Schaum C-E, Pawar S, Yvon-Durocher Get al., 2018, Metabolic traits predict the effects of warming on phytoplankton competition, ECOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 21, Pages: 655-664, ISSN: 1461-023X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Garcia-Carreras B, Sal S, Padfield D, Kontopoulos D-G, Bestion E, Schaum C-E, Yvon-Durocher G, Pawar Set al., 2018, Role of carbon allocation efficiency in the temperature dependence of autotroph growth rates, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol: 115, Pages: E7361-E7368, ISSN: 0027-8424

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Kissling WD, Walls R, Bowser A, Jones MO, Kattge J, Agosti D, Amengual J, Basset A, van Bodegom PM, Cornelissen JHC, Denny EG, Deudero S, Egloff W, Elmendorf SC, Alonso García E, Jones KD, Jones OR, Lavorel S, Lear D, Navarro LM, Pawar S, Pirzl R, Rüger N, Sal S, Salguero-Gómez R, Schigel D, Schulz K-S, Skidmore A, Guralnick RPet al., 2018, Towards global data products of Essential Biodiversity Variables on species traits., Nat Ecol Evol, Vol: 2, Pages: 1531-1540

Essential Biodiversity Variables (EBVs) allow observation and reporting of global biodiversity change, but a detailed framework for the empirical derivation of specific EBVs has yet to be developed. Here, we re-examine and refine the previous candidate set of species traits EBVs and show how traits related to phenology, morphology, reproduction, physiology and movement can contribute to EBV operationalization. The selected EBVs express intra-specific trait variation and allow monitoring of how organisms respond to global change. We evaluate the societal relevance of species traits EBVs for policy targets and demonstrate how open, interoperable and machine-readable trait data enable the building of EBV data products. We outline collection methods, meta(data) standardization, reproducible workflows, semantic tools and licence requirements for producing species traits EBVs. An operationalization is critical for assessing progress towards biodiversity conservation and sustainable development goals and has wide implications for data-intensive science in ecology, biogeography, conservation and Earth observation.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Kontopoulos D-G, Garcia-Carreras B, Sal S, Smith TP, Pawar Set al., 2018, Use and misuse of temperature normalisation in meta-analyses of thermal responses of biological traits, PEERJ, Vol: 6, ISSN: 2167-8359

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Rizzuto M, Carbone C, Pawar S, 2018, Foraging constraints reverse the scaling of activity time in carnivores, NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 2, Pages: 247-+, ISSN: 2397-334X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Zheng JX-S, Pawar S, Goodman DFM, 2018, Graph Drawing by Stochastic Gradient Descent., IEEE Trans Vis Comput Graph

A popular method of force-directed graph drawing is multidimensional scaling using graph-theoretic distances as input. We present an algorithm to minimize its energy function, known as stress, by using stochastic gradient descent (SGD) to move a single pair of vertices at a time. Our results show that SGD can reach lower stress levels faster and more consistently than majorization, without needing help from a good initialization. We then show how the unique properties of SGD make it easier to produce constrained layouts than previous approaches. We also show how SGD can be directly applied within the sparse stress approximation of Ortmann et al. [1], making the algorithm scalable up to large graphs.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Schaum C-E, Barton S, Bestion E, Buckling A, Garcia-Carreras B, Lopez P, Lowe C, Pawar S, Smirnoff N, Trimmer M, Yvon-Durocher Get al., 2017, Adaptation of phytoplankton to a decade of experimental warming linked to increased photosynthesis, NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 1, ISSN: 2397-334X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar S, Dell AI, Savage VM, Knies JLet al., 2016, Real versus Artificial Variation in the Thermal Sensitivity of Biological Traits, AMERICAN NATURALIST, Vol: 187, Pages: E41-E52, ISSN: 0003-0147

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Woodward G, Bonada N, Brown LE, Death RG, Durance I, Gray C, Hladyz S, Ledger ME, Milner AM, Ormerod SJ, Thompson RM, Pawar Set al., 2016, The effects of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on running water ecosystems, PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 371, ISSN: 0962-8436

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gibert JP, Dell AI, DeLong JP, Pawar Set al., 2015, Scaling-up Trait Variation from Individuals to Ecosystems, ADVANCES IN ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH, VOL 52: TRAIT-BASED ECOLOGY - FROM STRUCTURE TO FUNCTION, Editors: Pawar, Woodward, Dell, Publisher: ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC, Pages: 1-17

BOOK CHAPTER

Johnson LR, Ben-Horin T, Lafferty KD, McNally A, Mordecai E, Paaijmans KP, Pawar S, Ryan SJet al., 2015, Understanding uncertainty in temperature effects on vector-borne disease: a Bayesian approach, ECOLOGY, Vol: 96, Pages: 203-213, ISSN: 0012-9658

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar S, 2015, The Role of Body Size Variation in Community Assembly, ADVANCES IN ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH, VOL 52: TRAIT-BASED ECOLOGY - FROM STRUCTURE TO FUNCTION, Vol: 52, Pages: 201-248, ISSN: 0065-2504

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar S, 2015, The role of body size variation in community assembly, Adv. Ecol. Res., Vol: 52

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar S, Dell AI, Savage VM, 2015, From metabolic constraints on individuals to the eco-evolutionary dynamics of ecosystems, Aquat. Funct. Biodivers. An Eco-Evolutionary Approach, Editors: Belgrano, Woodward, Jacob, Publisher: Elsevier, Pages: In Press-In Press

BOOK CHAPTER

Dell AI, Pawar S, Savage VM, 2014, Temperature dependence of trophic interactions are driven by asymmetry of species responses and foraging strategy, JOURNAL OF ANIMAL ECOLOGY, Vol: 83, Pages: 70-84, ISSN: 0021-8790

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar S, 2014, Why are plant-pollinator networks nested?, SCIENCE, Vol: 345, Pages: 383-383, ISSN: 0036-8075

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Tang S, Pawar S, Allesina S, 2014, Correlation between interaction strengths drives stability in large ecological networks, ECOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 17, Pages: 1094-1100, ISSN: 1461-023X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dell AI, Pawar S, Savage VM, 2013, The thermal dependence of biological traits, Ecology, Vol: 94, Pages: 1205-1206, ISSN: 0012-9658

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Johnson LR, Lafferty K, McNally A, Mordecai E, Paaijmans K, Pawar S, Ryan SJet al., 2013, Mapping the Distribution of Malaria: current methods and considerations, Infectious Disease Modelling, Hoboken, N.J., Publisher: Wiley-Interscience, Pages: In Press-In Press

BOOK CHAPTER

Mordecai EA, Paaijmans KP, Johnson LR, Balzer C, Ben-Horin T, Moor E, McNally A, Pawar S, Ryan SJ, Smith TC, Lafferty KDet al., 2013, Optimal temperature for malaria transmission is dramatically lower than previously predicted, ECOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 16, Pages: 22-30, ISSN: 1461-023X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar S, Dell AI, Savage VM, 2013, Does consumption rate scale superlinearly? Reply, NATURE, Vol: 493, Pages: E2-E3, ISSN: 0028-0836

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar S, Dell AI, Savage VM, 2012, Dimensionality of consumer search space drives trophic interaction strengths, NATURE, Vol: 486, Pages: 485-489, ISSN: 0028-0836

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dell AI, Pawar S, Savage VM, 2011, Systematic variation in the temperature dependence of physiological and ecological traits, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol: 108, Pages: 10591-10596, ISSN: 0027-8424

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar S, 2009, Community assembly, stability and signatures of dynamical constraints on food web structure, JOURNAL OF THEORETICAL BIOLOGY, Vol: 259, Pages: 601-612, ISSN: 0022-5193

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar S, Koo MS, Kelley C, Ahmed MF, Chaudhuri S, Sarkay Set al., 2007, Conservation assessment and prioritization of areas in Northeast India: Priorities for amphibians and reptiles, BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION, Vol: 136, Pages: 346-361, ISSN: 0006-3207

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar SS, Birand AC, Ahmed MF, Sengupta S, Raman TRSet al., 2007, Conservation biogeography in North-east India: hierarchical analysis of cross-taxon distributional congruence, DIVERSITY AND DISTRIBUTIONS, Vol: 13, Pages: 53-65, ISSN: 1366-9516

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Biswas S, Pawar SS, 2006, Phylogenetic tests of distribution patterns in South Asia: towards an integrative approach, JOURNAL OF BIOSCIENCES, Vol: 31, Pages: 95-113, ISSN: 0250-5991

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar SS, 2005, Geographical variation in the rate of evolution: Effect of available energy or fluctuating environment?, EVOLUTION, Vol: 59, Pages: 234-237, ISSN: 0014-3820

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Birand A, Pawar S, 2004, An ornithological survey in north-east India, Forktail, Vol: 20, Pages: 7-16

We conducted surveys between October 2000 and June 2001 at nine sites in north-east India with low- to mid-elevation tropical evergreen forest, with a particular focus on forest species. 261 bird species were recorded, including five globally threatened species (White-winged Duck Cairina scutulata, Rufous-necked Hornbill Aceros nipalensis, Pallas’s Fish Eagle Haliaeetus leucoryphus, Lesser Adjutant Leptoptilos javanicus, Beautiful Nuthatch Sitta formosa, four Near Threatened species (White-cheeked Partridge Arborophila atrogularis, Great Hornbill Buceros bicornis, Brown Hornbill Anorrhinus tickelli, Blyth’s Kingfisher Alcedo hercules), three restricted-range species, several poorly known species, and a number of new altitudinalrecords. In general, north-east India remains deficient in avifaunal data. Further surveys, especially in the poorly known interior montane tracts, are needed to assist the identification of conservation priorities in the region.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pawar SS, Rawat GS, Choudhury BC, 2004, Recovery of frog and lizard communities following primary habitat alteration in Mizoram, Northeast India., BMC Ecol, Vol: 4

BACKGROUND: Community recovery following primary habitat alteration can provide tests for various hypotheses in ecology and conservation biology. Prominent among these are questions related to the manner and rate of community assembly after habitat perturbation. Here we use space-for-time substitution to analyse frog and lizard community assembly along two gradients of habitat recovery following slash and burn agriculture (jhum) in Mizoram, Northeast India. One recovery gradient undergoes natural succession to mature tropical rainforest, while the other involves plantation of jhum fallows with teak Tectona grandis monoculture. RESULTS: Frog and lizard communities accumulated species steadily during natural succession, attaining characteristics similar to those from mature forest after 30 years of regeneration. Lizards showed higher turnover and lower augmentation of species relative to frogs. Niche based classification identified a number of guilds, some of which contained both frogs and lizards. Successional change in species richness was due to increase in the number of guilds as well as the number of species per guild. Phylogenetic structure increased with succession for some guilds. Communities along the teak plantation gradient on the other hand, did not show any sign of change with chronosere age. Factor analysis revealed sets of habitat variables that independently determined changes in community and guild composition during habitat recovery. CONCLUSIONS: The timescale of frog and lizard community recovery was comparable with that reported by previous studies on different faunal groups in other tropical regions. Both communities converged on primary habitat attributes during natural vegetation succession, the recovery being driven by deterministic, nonlinear changes in habitat characteristics. On the other hand, very little faunal recovery was seen even in relatively old teak plantation. In general, tree monocultures are unlikely to support recovery of natura

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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