Imperial College London

ProfessorSimonSchultz

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Bioengineering

Professor of Neurotechnology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1533s.schultz Website

 
 
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Location

 

4.11Royal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@unpublished{Berditchevskaia:2016:10.1101/051607,
author = {Berditchevskaia, A and Cazé, RD and Schultz, SR},
doi = {10.1101/051607},
publisher = {Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory},
title = {Performance in a GO/NOGO perceptual task reflects a balance between impulsive and instrumental components of behaviour},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/051607},
year = {2016}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - UNPB
AB - <jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>In recent years, simple GO/NOGO behavioural tasks have become popular due to the relative ease with which they can be combined with technologies such as <jats:italic>in vivo</jats:italic> multiphoton imaging. To date, it has been assumed that behavioural performance can be captured by the average performance across a session, however this neglects the effect of motivation on behaviour within individual sessions. We investigated the effect of motivation on mice performing a GO/NOGO visual discrimination task. Performance within a session tended to follow a stereotypical trajectory on a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) chart, beginning with an over-motivated state with many false positives, and transitioning through a more or less optimal regime to end with a low hit rate after satiation. Our observations are reproduced by a new model, the Motivated Actor-Critic, introduced here. Our results suggest that standard measures of discriminability, obtained by averaging across a session, may significantly underestimate behavioural performance.</jats:p>
AU - Berditchevskaia,A
AU - Cazé,RD
AU - Schultz,SR
DO - 10.1101/051607
PB - Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory
PY - 2016///
TI - Performance in a GO/NOGO perceptual task reflects a balance between impulsive and instrumental components of behaviour
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/051607
ER -