Imperial College London

ProfessorSpencerSherwin

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Aeronautics

Professor of Computational Fluid Mechanics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5052s.sherwin Website

 
 
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Location

 

313BCity and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Mohamied:2016:10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.11.035,
author = {Mohamied, Y and Sherwin, SJ and Weinberg, PD},
doi = {10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.11.035},
journal = {Journal of Biomechanics},
pages = {102--109},
title = {Understanding the fluid mechanics behind transverse wall shear stress},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.11.035},
volume = {50},
year = {2016}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - The patchy distribution of atherosclerosis within arteries is widely attributed to local variation in haemodynamic wall shear stress (WSS). A recently-introduced metric, the transverse wall shear stress (transWSS), which is the average over the cardiac cycle of WSS components perpendicular to the temporal mean WSS vector, correlates particularly well with the pattern of lesions around aortic branch ostia. Here we use numerical methods to investigate the nature of the arterial flows captured by transWSS and the sensitivity of transWSS to inflow waveform and aortic geometry. TransWSS developed chiefly in the acceleration, peak systolic and deceleration phases of the cardiac cycle; the reverse flow phase was too short, and WSS in diastole was too low, for these periods to have a significant influence. Most of the spatial variation in transWSS arose from variation in the angle by which instantaneous WSS vectors deviated from the mean WSS vector rather than from variation in the magnitude of the vectors. The pattern of transWSS was insensitive to inflow waveform; only unphysiologically high Womersley numbers produced substantial changes. However, transWSS was sensitive to changes in geometry. The curvature of the arch and proximal descending aorta were responsible for the principal features, the non-planar nature of the aorta produced asymmetries in the location and position of streaks of high transWSS, and taper determined the persistence of the streaks down the aorta. These results reflect the importance of the fluctuating strength of Dean vortices in generating transWSS.
AU - Mohamied,Y
AU - Sherwin,SJ
AU - Weinberg,PD
DO - 10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.11.035
EP - 109
PY - 2016///
SN - 1873-2380
SP - 102
TI - Understanding the fluid mechanics behind transverse wall shear stress
T2 - Journal of Biomechanics
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2016.11.035
UR - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27863740
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/42979
VL - 50
ER -