Imperial College London

Dr Sharon Marie Weldon

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Honorary Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

s.weldon Website

 
 
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Location

 

H3/08Chelsea and Westminster HospitalChelsea and Westminster Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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66 results found

Weldon SM, Korkiakangas T, Calzada J, Korndorffer JR, Kneebone RLet al., 2019, A surgical team simulation to improve teamwork and communication across two continents: ViSIOT Proof-of-Concept Study, Journal of Surgical Education, Vol: 76, Pages: 1413-1424, ISSN: 1931-7204

BACKGROUND: Team communication in operating rooms is problematic worldwide, and can negatively impact patient safety. Although initiatives such as the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist have been introduced to improve communication, patient safety continues to be compromised globally, warranting the development of new interventions. Video-based social science methods have contributed to the study of communication in UK ORs through actual observations of surgical teams in practice. Drawing on this, the authors have developed a surgical team simulation-training model [Video-Supported Simulation of Interactions in the Operating Theatre (ViSIOT)]. A proof-of-concept study was conducted in the UK and USA to assess if the ViSIOT simulation-training has applicability and acceptability beyond the UK. METHODS: ViSIOT training was conducted at two simulation centers in the UK and USA over a 10-month period. All surgical team participants completed a questionnaire (that assessed design, education, satisfaction, and self-confidence in relation to the training). Descriptive and inferential statistics were performed for the quantitative data and thematic analysis was conducted for the qualitative data. RESULTS: There was strong agreement from all participants in terms of their perception of the course across all sub-sections measured. Nine themes from the qualitative data were identified. The two countries shared most themes, however, some emerged that were unique to each country. CONCLUSIONS: Practical developments in the course design, technology, and recruitment were identified. Evidence of the course applicability in the USA provides further affirmation of the universal need for team communication training within ORs. Further studies are required to assess its effectiveness in improving communication in OR practice.

Journal article

Ojo O, Weldon SM, Thompson T, Vargo EJet al., 2019, The Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Glycaemic Control in Women with Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomised Controlled Trials, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 16

Journal article

Imran A, Holden B, Weldon SM, Boak D, Klaber B, Kneebone R, Watson M, Bello Fet al., 2019, 'How to help your unwell child': A sequential simulation project, BMJ Simulation and Technology Enhanced Learning, ISSN: 2056-6697

Journal article

Weil A, Weldon SM, Kronfli M, Watkins B, Kneebone R, Bello F, Cox Set al., 2018, A new approach to multi-professional end of life care training using a sequential simulation (SqS Simulation™) design: a mixed methods study, Nurse Education Today, Vol: 71, Pages: 26-33, ISSN: 0260-6917

BACKGROUND: A need for improved education and training for hospital staff caring for patients in the last year of life was identified at an urban UK hospital. Sequential Simulation (SqS Simulation™) is a type of simulation that recreates a patient's journey, considering the longitudinal element of care and how this might impact on the patient's experiences, wishes and needs. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate a new end of life care training intervention for multi-professional hospital staff, and its effect on their confidence in managing patients at the end of their life. SETTING/PARTICIPANTS: Based on the results of a formal Training Needs Analysis, four SqS Simulation™ specialty-based courses were designed for general medical and surgical multidisciplinary teams in an acute UK hospital. METHODS: Over three months, seven SqS Simulation™ sessions were attended by fifty-seven multidisciplinary healthcare professionals. A quasi-experimental mixed-methods study was conducted using open and closed-ended questionnaires, pre and post-intervention. Changes in course attendees' confidence levels were analysed and qualitative data from free-text answers informed potential reasons for any differences identified. RESULTS: Confidence improved for all professional cohorts (p < 0.001). The differences were found to be highly significant for 'doctors' (p < 0.001), significant for 'therapists' (p = 0.02) and not significant for the 'nurses' cohort (p = 0.238). This was explored further using a qualitative explanatory framework. Categories included: Communicating with Families; Teamwork; Goal Planning; Do Not Attempt Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation; Course Usefulness; Prior Training; and Clinical Experience. CONCLUSION: This study has shown an overall improvement in confidence across disciplines after attending a SqS Simulation™ course. The differences in quantitative results between disciplines were explored through the qualitative data

Journal article

Payne JE, Dubois AV, Ingram RJ, Weldon S, Taggart CC, Elborn JS, Tunney MMet al., 2017, Activity of innate antimicrobial peptides and ivacaftor against clinical cystic fibrosis respiratory pathogens, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS, Vol: 50, Pages: 427-435, ISSN: 0924-8579

Journal article

Weldon SM, Kelay T, Ako E, Cox BM, Bello F, Kneebone Ret al., 2017, Sequential simulation used as a novel educational tool aimed at healthcare managers: a patient-centred approach, BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning, Vol: 4, Pages: 13-18, ISSN: 2056-6697

Background A new challenge for healthcare managers is to improve the patient experience. Simulation is often used for clinical assessment and rarely for those operating outside of direct clinical care. Sequential simulation (SqS) is a form of simulation that re-creates care pathways, widening its potential use.Local problem Numbers, outcome measures and system profiling are used to inform healthcare decisions. However, none of these captures the personal subtleties of a patient’s experience.Intervention 56 students attended a teaching module using SqS and facilitated workshops as part of their induction week on an MSc International Health Management course. The workshop was voluntary and was offered as an opportunity for the students to gain an insight into the UK health system through the medium of simulation.Methods An evaluation survey incorporating quantitative and qualitative student feedback was conducted. Descriptive statistics were generated from the quantitative data, and thematic analysis was undertaken for the qualitative data.Results There was strong agreement for the acceptability of the workshop approach in relation to the aims and objectives. Likert scale (1–-5) mean total=4.49. Participants responded enthusiastically (revealed through the qualitative data) with ideas related to perspectives sharing, understanding healthcare management and processes and the consideration of feasibility and practicalities. They also suggested other applications that SqS could be used for.Conclusion The SqS approach has demonstrated that simulation has a wider potential than for clinical assessment alone. Further studies are required to determine its potential uses and affordances beyond its current format.

Journal article

Small DM, Doherty DF, Dougan CM, Weldon S, Taggart CCet al., 2017, The role of whey acidic protein four-disulfide-core proteins in respiratory health and disease, BIOLOGICAL CHEMISTRY, Vol: 398, Pages: 425-440, ISSN: 1431-6730

Journal article

Weldon S, Changing the simulation horizon: Let there be light, Annual Physician Associate Educators' Conference

Conference paper

Bezemer J, Cope A, Korkiakangas T, Kress G, Murtagh G, Weldon SM, Kneebone Ret al., 2016, Microanalysis of video from the operating room: an underused approach to patient safety research, BMJ Quality & Safety, Vol: 26, Pages: 583-587, ISSN: 2044-5423

Journal article

Huddy JR, Weldon SM, Ralhan S, Painter T, Hanna GB, Kneebone R, Bello Fet al., 2016, Sequential simulation (SqS) of clinical pathways: a tool for public and patient engagement in point-of-care diagnostics., BMJ Open, Vol: 6, Pages: e011043-e011043, ISSN: 2044-6055

OBJECTIVES: Public and patient engagement (PPE) is fundamental to healthcare research. To facilitate effective engagement in novel point-of-care tests (POCTs), the test and downstream consequences of the result need to be considered. Sequential simulation (SqS) is a tool to represent patient journeys and the effects of intervention at each and subsequent stages. This case study presents a process evaluation of SqS as a tool for PPE in the development of a volatile organic compound-based breath test POCT for the diagnosis of oesophagogastric (OG) cancer. SETTING: Three 3-hour workshops in central London. PARTICIPANTS: 38 members of public attended a workshop, 26 (68%) had no prior experience of the OG cancer diagnostic pathway. INTERVENTIONS: Clinical pathway SqS was developed from a storyboard of a patient, played by an actor, noticing symptoms of oesophageal cancer and following a typical diagnostic pathway. The proposed breath testing strategy was then introduced and incorporated into a second SqS to demonstrate pathway impact. Facilitated group discussions followed each SqS. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Evaluation was conducted through pre-event and postevent questionnaires, field notes and analysis of audiovisual recordings. RESULTS: 38 participants attended a workshop. All participants agreed they were able to contribute to discussions and like the idea of an OG cancer breath test. Five themes emerged related to the proposed new breath test including awareness of OG cancer, barriers to testing and diagnosis, design of new test device, new clinical pathway and placement of test device. 3 themes emerged related to the use of SqS: participatory engagement, simulation and empathetic engagement, and why participants attended. CONCLUSIONS: SqS facilitated a shared immersive experience for participants and researchers that led to the coconstruction of knowledge that will guide future research activities and be of value to stakeholders concerned with the inv

Journal article

Weldon S, Kneebone R, Bello F, 2016, Collaborative healthcare remodelling through Sequential Simulation (SqS): a patient and front-line staff perspective, BMJ Simulation & Technology Enhanced Learning, Vol: 2, Pages: 78-86, ISSN: 2056-6697

Background The Department of health funded an initiative to pioneer new approaches that would create a more integrated form of care.Local problem In order to receive funding, local Clinical Commissioning Groups were required to engage a range of stakeholders in a practical approach that generated the development of an integrated model of care.Intervention Two sequential simulation (SqS) workshops comprising 65 and 93 participants, respectively, were designed using real patient scenarios from the locality, covering areas of general practice, community health and adult social care. Workshops were attended by a diverse group of stakeholders. The first workshop addressed current care pathways and the second modelled ideal care pathways generated from the data obtained at the first workshop.Methods Discussions were captured through video recording, field-notes and pre and post questionnaires. Data was collated, transcribed and analysed through a combination of descriptive statistics and thematic analysis.Results The questionnaires revealed that attendees strongly agreed that they had had an opportunity to contribute to all discussions and raise questions, concerns and ideas (100%). Pre and post knowledge of current and new models of care was vastly improved. The opportunity to share information and to network was valued, with the SqS approach seen as breaking professional barriers (100%).Conclusions Simulation can be used as a tool to engage stakeholders in designing integrated models of care. The systematic data collection from the diverse ideas generated also allows for a much-needed ‘ear’ to those providing the solutions, as well as a legitimate and balanced perspective.

Journal article

Weldon S, Ralhan S, Paice L, Kneebone R, Bello Fet al., 2016, Sequential simulation of a patient journey, Clinical Teacher, Vol: 14, Pages: 90-94, ISSN: 1743-4971

Objectives: To develop an intervention for educating pharmacists(community and hospital) about integrated care and their role in implementingit.Methods: We developed a sequential simulation derived from a patient’sjourney, the key scenario featuring a community pharmacist. The scenarioswere designed with input from pharmacists and patients, and emphasized theeffect operating in silos can have on the patient.Evaluation: Evaluation was by questionnaire, field notes and analysis ofvideo material. 21/37 (56.7%) participants responded to the questionnaire.19/21 expressed that they felt the event was a good or excellent educationalexperience, and had improved their confidence in their capability to improvepatient care. 19/21 said their knowledge and understanding of integrated carehad been enhanced. The sequential simulation was appreciated as a way ofvisualizing integrated care, with 19/21 describing it as good or excellent.Further themes were identified through video-analysis and field note analysis.Conclusion: Sequential Simulation is a novel and practical approach topresent current care pathways, aiming to generate a mutual focus, createparticipant empathy and bring the conventionalities of integrated care to life.We consider this approach helpful in preparing frontline staff to participate in integrated care.

Journal article

Kneebone R, Weldon S-M, Bello F, 2016, Engaging patients and clinicians through simulation: rebalancing the dynamics of care, Advances in Simulation, Vol: 1, ISSN: 2059-0628

This paper proposes simulation-based enactment of care as an innovative and fruitful means of engaging patients and clinicians to create collaborative solutions to healthcare issues. This use of simulation is a radical departure from traditional transmission models of education and training. Instead, we frame simulation as co-development, through which professionals, patients and publics share their equally (though differently) expert perspectives. The paper argues that a process of participatory design can bring about new insights and that simulation offers understandings that cannot easily be expressed in words. Drawing on more than a decade of our group’s research on simulation and engagement, the paper summarises findings from studies relating to clinician-patient collaboration and proposes a novel approach to address the current need. The paper outlines a mechanism whereby pathways of care are jointly created, shaped, tested and refined by professionals, patients, carers and others who are affected and concerned by clinical care.

Journal article

Ralhan S, Weldon S, Kneebone R, Bello Fet al., Sequential Simulation Workshops: An Innovative Approach to Working Together (engaging front-line staff, patients and publics) to Develop New Integrated Models of Care, Trainees in the Association for the Study of Medical Education

Conference paper

Weldon S, Korkiakangas T, Video-Supported Simulation for Interactions in the Operating Theatre (ViSIOTTM), The Society in Europe for Simulation Applied to Medicine

Conference paper

Weldon S, Korkiakangas T, Music in the Operating Room, AORN Surgical Conference & Expo

Conference paper

Korkiakangas T, Weldon S, ViSIOT: Evidence-based training for improving interactions in the operating room, AORN Surgical Conference & Expo

Conference paper

Korkiakangas T, Weldon S, Mobilizing a team for the Surgical Safety Checklist: Interactional analysis, AORN Surgical Conference & Expo

Conference paper

Sadideen H, Weldon S-M, Saadeddin M, Loon M, Kneebone Ret al., 2015, A Video Analysis of Intra- and Interprofessional Leadership Behaviors Within "The Burns Suite": Identifying Key Leadership Models, Journal of Surgical Education, Vol: 73, Pages: 31-39, ISSN: 1931-7204

ObjectiveLeadership is particularly important in complex highly interprofessional health care contexts involving a number of staff, some from the same specialty (intraprofessional), and others from different specialties (interprofessional). The authors recently published the concept of “The Burns Suite” (TBS) as a novel simulation tool to deliver interprofessional and teamwork training. It is unclear which leadership behaviors are the most important in an interprofessional burns resuscitation scenario, and whether they can be modeled on to current leadership theory. The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive video analysis of leadership behaviors within TBS.MethodsA total of 3 burns resuscitation simulations within TBS were recorded. The video analysis was grounded-theory inspired. Using predefined criteria, actions/interactions deemed as leadership behaviors were identified. Using an inductive iterative process, 8 main leadership behaviors were identified. Cohen’s κ coefficient was used to measure inter-rater agreement and calculated as κ = 0.7 (substantial agreement). Each video was watched 4 times, focusing on 1 of the 4 team members per viewing (senior surgeon, senior nurse, trainee surgeon, and trainee nurse). The frequency and types of leadership behavior of each of the 4 team members were recorded. Statistical significance to assess any differences was assessed using analysis of variance, whereby a p < 0.05 was taken to be significant. Leadership behaviors were triangulated with verbal cues and actions from the videos.ResultsAll 3 scenarios were successfully completed. The mean scenario length was 22 minutes. A total of 362 leadership behaviors were recorded from the 12 participants. The most evident leadership behaviors of all team members were adhering to guidelines (which effectively equates to following Advanced Trauma and Life Support/Emergency Management of Severe Burns resuscitation guidelines and hence &l

Journal article

Bezemer J, Korkiakangas T, Weldon S, Kress G, Kneebone Ret al., 2015, Unsettled teamwork: Communication and learning in the operating theatres of an urban hospital, Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol: 72, Pages: 361-372, ISSN: 0309-2402

AimTo explore the unsettling effects of increased mobility of nurses, surgeons and other healthcare professionals on communication and learning in the operating theatre.BackgroundIncreasingly, healthcare professionals step in and out of newly formed transient teams and work with colleagues they have not met before, unsettling previously relatively stable team work based on shared, local knowledge accumulated over significant periods of close collaboration.DesignAn ethnographic case study was conducted of the operating theatre department of a major teaching hospital in London.MethodVideo recordings were made of 20 operations, involving different teams. The recordings were systematically reviewed and coded. Instances where difficulties arose in the communication between scrub nurse and surgeons were identified and subjected to detailed, interactional analysis.FindingsInstrument requests frequently prompted clarification from the scrub nurse (e.g. ‘Sorry, what did you want?’). Such requests were either followed by a relatively elaborate clarification, designed to maximize learning opportunities, or a by a relatively minimal clarification, designed to achieve the immediate task at hand.ConclusionsSignificant variation exists in the degree of support given to scrub nurses requesting clarification. Some surgeons experience such requests as disruptions, while others treat them as opportunities to build shared knowledge.

Journal article

Korkiakangas T, Weldon S, Bezemer J, Kneebone Ret al., 2015, “Coming Up!”: Why verbal acknowledgement matters in the operating theatre, Publisher: Equinox

Book

Kneebone RL, Weldon SM, Ralham S, Paice E, Bello Fet al., 2015, Sequential Simulation (SqS): an innovative approach to educating GP receptionists about integrated care via a patient journey – a mixed methods approach, BMC Family Practice, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1471-2296

BackgroundAn evaluation of an effective and engaging intervention for educating general practice (GP) receptionists about integrated care and the importance of their role within the whole system was conducted.MethodsWorkshops took place in North West London, one of England’s 14 ‘Integrated Care Pioneers.’ Three training days featuring Sequential Simulations (SqS) were held. Forty GP receptionists attended on each day, as well as 5–6 patients and 8–9 healthcare professionals. The SqS developed was from a collection of patient stories, the key scene of which featured a GP receptionist. The scenes were designed to show the consequences for the patient of professionals working in silos. This provided the focus for facilitated table discussions. The discussants suggested ways in which an unfortunate series of events could have been dealt with differently. These suggestions were then incorporated in a re-designed SqS. Evaluation was conducted through questionnaires, field notes and analysis of video material. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis were applied.ResultsNinety three participants responded to the questionnaire out of 131 attendees. All (93/93) respondents reported that the event was a powerful learning experience and that they had gained confidence in improving patient care. 98 % (91/93) reported that their knowledge of integrated care had improved. The simulation was rated highly as a learning experience [60 % (57/93) - excellent, 39 % (37/93) good]. Further evidence of educational benefit was expressed through comments such as: ‘The simulations really got me thinking about the patient as a human with many problems and situations.’ConclusionSqS is an innovative and practical way of presenting current care pathways and health care scenarios in order to create a shared focus, engage the emotions of the participants and bring the principles of integrated care to life. Facilitated table discussions are an opportuni

Journal article

Huddy J, Weldon S-M, Ralhan S, Bello F, Kneebone R, Hanna GBet al., 2015, Sequential simulation of clinical pathways: a tool for public and patient involvement in diagnostic research, UK Diagnostic Forum

Poster

Weldon S, Korkiakangas T, Bezemer J, Kneebone Ret al., Music and communication in the operating theatre, Journal of Advanced Nursing, ISSN: 1365-2648

Journal article

Paice L, Weldon S, Ralhan S, Bello F, Kneebone Ret al., 2015, Sequential simulation (SqS) of a patient journey: an intervention to engage GP receptionists in integrated care, 15th International Conference on Integrated Care, Publisher: Ubiquity Press, ISSN: 1568-4156

Conference paper

Coates L, Weldon S-M, Rodrigues A, Bello F, Kneebone Ret al., 2015, Simulation as a public engagement: Engaging children in medicine and science in some surprising places, International Pediatric Simulation Symposia and Workshops

Conference paper

Weldon S, Woodward P, Granados A, Coates L, Kelay T, Kneebone R, Bello Fet al., 2015, Future of Technology: The latest in simulation technology, RCGP - City Health Safeguarding the Future

Conference paper

Paice E, Weldon S-M, Ralhan S, Bello F, Kneebone Ret al., Patient produced simulation for education and training, International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare

Conference paper

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