Imperial College London

DrSusanHodgson

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2789susan.hodgson Website

 
 
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Location

 

526Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Forrest:2011:10.1186/1471-2458-11-895,
author = {Forrest, LF and Hodgson, S and Parker, L and Pearce, MS},
doi = {10.1186/1471-2458-11-895},
journal = {BMC Public Health},
title = {The influence of childhood IQ and education on social mobility in the Newcastle Thousand Families birth cohort},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-11-895},
volume = {11},
year = {2011}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Background: It has been suggested that social, educational, cultural and physical factors in childhood and earlyadulthood may influence the chances and direction of social mobility, the movement of an individual betweensocial classes over his/her life-course. This study examined the association of such factors with intra-generationaland inter-generational social mobility within the Newcastle Thousand Families 1947 birth cohort.Methods: Multivariable logistic regression was used to examine the potential association of sex, housingconditions at age 5 years, childhood IQ, achieved education level, adult height and adverse events in earlychildhood with upward and downward social mobility.Results: Childhood IQ and achieved education level were significantly and independently associated with upwardmobility between the ages of 5 and 49-51 years. Only education was significantly associated (positively) withupward social mobility between 5 and 25 years, and only childhood IQ (again positively) with upward socialmobility between 25 and 49-51 years. Childhood IQ was significantly negatively associated with downward socialmobility. Adult height, childhood housing conditions, adverse events in childhood and sex were not significantdeterminants of upward or downward social mobility in this cohort.Conclusions: As upward social mobility has been associated with better health as well as more general benefits tosociety, supportive measures to improve childhood circumstances that could result in increased IQ and educationalattainment may have long-term population health and wellbeing benefits.
AU - Forrest,LF
AU - Hodgson,S
AU - Parker,L
AU - Pearce,MS
DO - 10.1186/1471-2458-11-895
PY - 2011///
SN - 1471-2458
TI - The influence of childhood IQ and education on social mobility in the Newcastle Thousand Families birth cohort
T2 - BMC Public Health
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-11-895
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/29166
VL - 11
ER -