Imperial College London

ProfessorTimBarraclough

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Professor of Evolutionary Biology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2247t.barraclough Website

 
 
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Location

 

N2.4Silwood ParkSilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

102 results found

Barraclough TG, Savolainen V, 2001, Evolutionary rates and species diversity in flowering plants, EVOLUTION, Vol: 55, Pages: 677-683, ISSN: 0014-3820

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ribera I, Barraclough TG, Vogler AP, 2001, The effect of habitat type on speciation rates and range movements in aquatic beetles: inferences from species-level phylogenies, MOLECULAR ECOLOGY, Vol: 10, Pages: 721-735, ISSN: 0962-1083

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barraclough TG, Vogler AP, 2000, Detecting the geographical pattern of speciation from species-level phylogenies, AMERICAN NATURALIST, Vol: 155, Pages: 419-434, ISSN: 0003-0147

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barraclough TG, Hogan JE, Vogler AP, 1999, Testing whether ecological factors promote cladogenesis in a group of tiger beetles (Coleoptera : Cicindelidae), PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 266, Pages: 1061-1067, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barraclough TG, Barclay MVL, Vogler AP, 1998, Species richness: Does flower power explain beetle-mania?, CURRENT BIOLOGY, Vol: 8, Pages: R843-R845, ISSN: 0960-9822

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barraclough TG, Nee S, Harvey PH, 1998, Sister-group analysis in identifying correlates of diversification - Comment, EVOLUTIONARY ECOLOGY, Vol: 12, Pages: 751-754, ISSN: 0269-7653

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barraclough TG, Vogler AP, Harvey PH, 1998, Revealing the factors that promote speciation, PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF LONDON SERIES B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 353, Pages: 241-249, ISSN: 0962-8436

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Degen AA, Kam M, Khokhlova IS, Krasnov BR, Barraclough TGet al., 1998, Average daily metabolic rate of rodents: habitat and dietary comparisons, FUNCTIONAL ECOLOGY, Vol: 12, Pages: 63-73, ISSN: 0269-8463

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Vogler AP, Welsh A, Barraclough TG, 1998, Molecular phylogeny of the Cicindela maritima (Coleoptera : Cicindelidae) group indicates fast radiation in western North America, ANNALS OF THE ENTOMOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA, Vol: 91, Pages: 185-194, ISSN: 0013-8746

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Barraclough TG, Harvey PH, Nee S, 1996, Rate of rbcL gene sequence evolution and species diversification in flowering plants (angiosperms), PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 263, Pages: 589-591, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

BARRACLOUGH TG, HARVEY PH, NEE S, 1995, SEXUAL SELECTION AND TAXONOMIC DIVERSITY IN PASSERINE BIRDS, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 259, Pages: 211-215, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wilson CG, Barraclough T, Nowell R, Cross-contamination explains "inter- and intraspecific horizontal genetic transfers" between asexual bdelloid rotifers, Current Biology, ISSN: 1879-0445

A few metazoan lineages are thought to have persisted for millions of years without sexual reproduction. If so, they would offer important clues to the evolutionary paradox of sex itself [1, 2]. Most "ancient asexuals" are subject to ongoing doubt because extant populations continue to invest 17 in males [3–9]. However, males are famously unknown in bdelloid rotifers, a class of microscopic invertebrates comprising hundreds of species [10–12]. Bdelloid genomes have acquired an unusually high proportion of genes from non-metazoans via horizontal transfer [13–17]. This well-substantiated finding has invited speculation [13] that homologous horizontal transfer between bdelloid individuals also may occur, perhaps even "replacing" sex [14]. In 2016, Current Biology published an Article claiming to supply evidence for this idea. Debortoli et al. [18] sampled rotifers from natural populations and sequenced one mitochondrial and four nuclear loci. Species assignments were incongruent among loci for several samples, which was interpreted as evidence of "interspecific horizontal genetic transfers". Here, we use sequencing chromatograms supplied by the authors to demonstrate that samples treated as individuals actually contained two or more highly divergent mitoc hondrial and ribosomal sequences, revealing cross-contamination with DNA from multiple animals of different species. Other chromatograms indicate contamination with DNA from conspecific animals, explaining genetic and genomic evidence for "intraspecific horizontal exchanges" reported in the same study. Given the clear evidence of contamination, the data and findings of Debortoli et al. [18] provide no reliable support for their conclusions that DNA is transferred horizontally between or within bdelloid species.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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