Imperial College London

Professor Tony Cass

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Chemistry

Professor of Chemistry
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5195t.cass

 
 
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Location

 

301KMolecular Sciences Research HubWhite City Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Gowers:2019:10.1021/acssensors.9b00288,
author = {Gowers, SAN and Freeman, DME and Rawson, TM and Rogers, ML and Wilson, RC and Holmes, AH and Cass, AE and O'Hare, D},
doi = {10.1021/acssensors.9b00288},
journal = {ACS Sensors},
pages = {1072--1080},
title = {Development of a minimally invasive microneedle-based sensor for continuous monitoring of β-lactam antibiotic concentrations in vivo},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acssensors.9b00288},
volume = {4},
year = {2019}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Antimicrobial resistance poses a global threat to patient health. Improving the use and effectiveness of antimicrobials is critical in addressing this issue. This includes optimizing the dose of antibiotic delivered to each individual. New sensing approaches that track antimicrobial concentration for each patient in real time could allow individualized drug dosing. This work presents a potentiometric microneedle-based biosensor to detect levels of β-lactam antibiotics in vivo in a healthy human volunteer. The biosensor is coated with a pH-sensitive iridium oxide layer, which detects changes in local pH as a result of β-lactam hydrolysis by β-lactamase immobilized on the electrode surface. Development and optimization of the biosensor coatings are presented, giving a limit of detection of 6.8 μM in 10 mM PBS solution. Biosensors were found to be stable for up to 2 weeks at -20 °C and to withstand sterilization. Sensitivity was retained after application for 6 h in vivo. Proof-of-concept results are presented showing that penicillin concentrations measured using the microneedle-based biosensor track those measured using both discrete blood and microdialysis sampling in vivo. These preliminary results show the potential of this microneedle-based biosensor to provide a minimally invasive means to measure real-time β-lactam concentrations in vivo, representing an important first step toward a closed-loop therapeutic drug monitoring system.
AU - Gowers,SAN
AU - Freeman,DME
AU - Rawson,TM
AU - Rogers,ML
AU - Wilson,RC
AU - Holmes,AH
AU - Cass,AE
AU - O'Hare,D
DO - 10.1021/acssensors.9b00288
EP - 1080
PY - 2019///
SN - 2379-3694
SP - 1072
TI - Development of a minimally invasive microneedle-based sensor for continuous monitoring of β-lactam antibiotic concentrations in vivo
T2 - ACS Sensors
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acssensors.9b00288
UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30950598
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/69547
VL - 4
ER -