Imperial College London

ProfessorTerryRudolph

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Physics

Professor of Quantum Physics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7863t.rudolph Website CV

 
 
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Location

 

Blackett LaboratorySouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Jevtic:2014:10.1364/JOSAB.32.000A50,
author = {Jevtic, S and Rudolph, T},
doi = {10.1364/JOSAB.32.000A50},
journal = {JOSA B},
title = {How Einstein and/or Schrödinger should have discovered Bell's Theorem in 1936},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAB.32.000A50},
volume = {32},
year = {2014}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - We show how one can be led from considerations of quantum steering to Bell'stheorem. We begin with Einstein's demonstration that, assuming local realism,quantum states must be in a many-to-one ("incomplete") relationship with thereal physical states of the system. We then consider some simple constraintsthat local realism imposes on any such incomplete model of physical reality,and show they are not satisfiable. In particular, we present a very simpledemonstration for the absence of a local hidden variable incomplete descriptionof nature by steering to two ensembles, one of which contains a pair ofnon-orthogonal states. Historically this is not how Bell's theorem arose -there are slight and subtle differences in the arguments - but it could havebeen.
AU - Jevtic,S
AU - Rudolph,T
DO - 10.1364/JOSAB.32.000A50
PY - 2014///
TI - How Einstein and/or Schrödinger should have discovered Bell's Theorem in 1936
T2 - JOSA B
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/JOSAB.32.000A50
UR - http://arxiv.org/abs/1411.4387v2
VL - 32
ER -