Imperial College London

ProfessorTimothyHallett

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Professor of Global Health
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1150timothy.hallett

 
 
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Location

 

Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Moorhouse:2019:10.1002/jia2.25309,
author = {Moorhouse, L and Schaefer, R and Thomas, R and Nyamukapa, C and Skovdal, M and Hallett, T and Gregson, S},
doi = {10.1002/jia2.25309},
journal = {Journal of the International AIDS Society},
pages = {86--92},
title = {Application of the HIV prevention cascade to identify, develop,and evaluate interventions to improve use of prevention methods:Examples from a study in east Zimbabwe},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25309},
volume = {22},
year = {2019}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Introduction: The HIV prevention cascade could be used in developing interventions to strengthen implementation of efficacious HIV prevention methods but its practical utility needs to be demonstrated. We propose a standardised approach to using the cascade to guide identification and evaluation of interventions and demonstrate its feasibility through a project to develop interventions to improve use of HIV prevention methods by adolescent girls and young women (AGYW) and potential male partners in east Zimbabwe.Discussion: We propose a six-step approach to using a published generic HIV prevention cascade formulation to develop interventions to increase motivation to use, access to and effective use of an HIV prevention method. The six steps are: (1) measure the HIV prevention cascade for the chosen population and method; (2) identify gaps in the cascade; (3) identify explanatory factors (barriers) contributing to observed gaps; (4) review literature to identify relevant theoretical frameworks and interventions; (5) tailor interventions to the local context; and (6) implement and evaluate the interventions using the cascade steps and explanatory factors as outcome indicators in the evaluation design. In the Zimbabwe example, steps 1-5 aided development of four interventions to overcome barriers to effective use of PrEP in AGYW (15-24 years) and VMMC in male partners (15-29). For young men, prevention cascade analyses identified gaps in motivation and access (due to transport costs/lost income) as barriers to VMMC uptake, so an intervention was designed including financial incentives and an education session. For AGYW, gaps in motivation (particularly lack of risk perception) and access were identified as barriers to PrEP uptake: an interactive counselling game was developed addressing these barriers. A text messaging intervention was developed to improve adherence to PrEP among AGYW, addressing reasons underlying lack of effective PrEP use through improving the capa
AU - Moorhouse,L
AU - Schaefer,R
AU - Thomas,R
AU - Nyamukapa,C
AU - Skovdal,M
AU - Hallett,T
AU - Gregson,S
DO - 10.1002/jia2.25309
EP - 92
PY - 2019///
SN - 1758-2652
SP - 86
TI - Application of the HIV prevention cascade to identify, develop,and evaluate interventions to improve use of prevention methods:Examples from a study in east Zimbabwe
T2 - Journal of the International AIDS Society
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jia2.25309
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/70485
VL - 22
ER -