Imperial College London

ProfessorUtaGriesenbach

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Professor of Molecular Medicine
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7927u.griesenbach

 
 
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Assistant

 

Miss Samia Soussi +44 (0)20 7594 7980

 
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Location

 

Emmanuel Kaye BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

226 results found

Sergijenko A, Moiseenko A, Pineault KM, Nafchi NA, Chan M, Gamlen T, Gill DR, Hyde S, Kreuz S, Griesenbach U, Alton EWet al., 2020, LOW LEVELS OF CFTR GENE TRANSFER WITH F/HN PSEUDOTYPED LENTIVIRUS ARE SUFFICIENT TO GENERATE ION TRANSPORT CORRECTION IN AIRWAY CELL CULTURES FROM CYSTIC FIBROSIS PATIENTS, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: S73-S73, ISSN: 8755-6863

Conference paper

Sinadinos A, Sergijenko A, Meng C, Gamlen T, Hyde S, Gill DR, Griesenbach U, Alton EWet al., 2020, DEVELOPMENT OF PROTOCOLS FOR MOUSE GLP-TOXICOLOGY STUDIES, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: S196-S196, ISSN: 8755-6863

Conference paper

Pineault KM, Meng C, Griesenbach U, Alton EWet al., 2020, BIODISTRIBUTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL SHEDDING OF LENTIVIRAL VECTORS FOLLOWING TOPICAL ADMINISTRATION TO MURINE LUNGS, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: S240-S240, ISSN: 8755-6863

Conference paper

Alton EW, Boyd A, Davies JC, Gill DR, Griesenbach U, Harman TE, Hyde S, McLachlan Get al., 2020, TOWARDS A FIRST-IN-HUMAN TRIAL WITH A PSEUDOTYPED LENTIVIRUS, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: S224-S224, ISSN: 8755-6863

Conference paper

Sinadinos A, Sergijenko A, Saleh A, Pineault KM, Nafchi NA, Hickmott JW, Choudhary TR, Mclaughlin CL, Gamlen T, Gill DR, Hyde S, McLachlan G, Alton EW, Griesenbach Uet al., 2020, SINGLE-CELL ASSAYS FOR QUANTIFYING MRNA AND PROTEIN DURING CYSTIC FIBROSIS GENE THERAPY TRIALS, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: S203-S203, ISSN: 8755-6863

Conference paper

Alton EWFW, Boyd AC, Davies JC, Gill DR, Griesenbach U, Harman TE, Hyde S, McLachlan Get al., 2020, Gene Therapy for Respiratory Diseases: Progress and a Changing Context, HUMAN GENE THERAPY, Vol: 31, Pages: 911-916, ISSN: 1043-0342

Journal article

Saleh AD, Durham SR, Shamji MH, Griesenbach U, Alton EWFWet al., 2019, PEAK NASAL INSPIRATORY FLOW AND NASAL CYTOKINES ARE USEFUL BIOMARKERS OF NASAL INFLAMMATION IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS GENE THERAPY, Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A13-A13, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Saleh A, Griesenbach U, Alton E, Sinadinos A, Meng Cet al., 2019, ASSAY DEVELOPMENT FOR A FIRST-IN-MAN LENTIVIRUS GENE THERAPY TRIAL FOR CYSTIC FIBROSIS, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: S358-S358, ISSN: 8755-6863

Conference paper

Bell RV, McKinnon TAJ, Alton EWFW, Griesenbach Uet al., 2019, Gene therapy for thrombotic thrombocytopaenic purpura, Annual Conference of the British Society for Gene and Cell Therapy, Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Pages: A14-A14, ISSN: 1043-0342

Thrombotic Thrombocytopaenic Purpura (TTP) is a rare (∼1/200,000 people) but life‐threatening disease caused by inherited or acquired deficiencies in ADAMTS13; a metalloprotease responsible for cleavage of large von Willebrand factor (VWF) multimers in the plasma. Reduced cleavage of thrombogenic VWF multimers through deficient ADAMTS13 can lead to spontaneous, wide‐spread accumulation of platelet‐rich thrombi. Without treatment, thrombi accumulation within the microvasculature causes organ failure and death in 90% of acute events. Individuals with TTP receive regular plasma infusions to restore ADAMTS13 levels. Despite current treatments reducing mortality rates, high treatment burden and morbidity associated with donor‐derived plasma warrants the development of a novel therapy for TTP. Gene therapy offers an alternative treatment which could prevent the onset of life‐threatening acute TTP episodes. The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium, has developed a lentivirus pseudotyped with the Sendai virus envelope proteins F and HN for efficient lung gene transfer. Here, we assess whether lungs can be used as ‘factories’ for efficient and persistent ADAMTS13 production. We first cloned ADAMTS13 cDNA into a lentivirus producer plasmid and demonstrated proteolytic activity against VWF following co‐expression in HEK293T cells and subsequent detection of cleaved VWF by SDS‐PAGE. Vector is currently being manufactured using GMP‐compliant production methods. Next, ADAMTS13 knockout mice were characterised to determine suitable biomarkers (e.g. ADAMTS13 plasma levels and VWF cleavage activity) for assessing efficacy of pulmonary gene transfer. Future work will assess the restoration of plasma ADAMTS13 function in knockout mice and protection against TTP‐like symptoms.

Conference paper

Griesenbach U, 2019, Gene therapy for pulmonary disorders, Annual Conference of the British-Society-for-Gene-and-Cell-Therapy, Publisher: MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, Pages: A4-A4, ISSN: 1043-0342

Conference paper

Palau H, Meng C, Bhargava A, Pilou A, Atsumi N, Byrne A, Pringle I, Ashworth R, Chan M, Gill D, Hyde S, Morgan C, Alton E, Griesenbach Uet al., 2019, Lentivirus Gene Therapy for Autoimmune Pulmonary Alveolar Proteinosis, 22nd Annual Meeting of the American-Society-of-Gene-and-Cell-Therapy (ASGCT), Publisher: CELL PRESS, Pages: 43-44, ISSN: 1525-0016

Conference paper

Davies G, Griesenbach U, Alton E, Davies JCet al., 2019, 53 - Molecular Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis, Kendig's Disorders of the Respiratory Tract in Children, Pages: 800-811.e3, ISBN: 9780323448871

© 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. This chapter describes the therapeutic strategies for cystic fibrosis which are based on targeting cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), either at the gene or protein level. We provide updates on small molecule CFTR modulators and gene therapy, focusing on clinical development and evaluation. The field has seen significant progress over recent years, particularly with the CFTR potentiator, ivacaftor, in patients with class III mutations. Increased understanding of the abnormalities in the structure and function of CFTR protein will help optimize the approaches required for normalizing function and, in doing so, aid the rational design of clinical trials-both in terms of the development of more efficacious drugs and the selection of appropriate patient populations. While progress with gene therapy remains some way behind, potential benefits (including being mutation agnostic and a nonsystemic route of delivery) remain significant. It may be that future optimal approaches will harness the benefits of more than one of these approaches and lead to considerable synergy. The ultimate goal for molecular and advanced therapies in cystic fibrosis is to find drugs or combinations of drugs capable of restoring CFTR function, applicable to patients with any genetic mutation.

Book chapter

Davies G, Griesenbach U, Alton E, Davies JCet al., 2019, Molecular Therapies for Cystic Fibrosis, Kendig's Disorders of the Respiratory Tract in Children, Publisher: Elsevier, Pages: 800-811.e3, ISBN: 9780323448871

Book chapter

Lund-Palau H, Meng C, Pilou A, Atsumi N, Bhargava A, Chan M, Byrne A, Pringle I, Ashworth R, Gill D, Hyde S, Morgan C, Alton E, Griesenbach Uet al., 2018, LENTIVIRUS GM-CSF GENE THERAPY AMELIORATES AUTOIMMUNE PULMONARY ALVEOLAR PROTEINOSIS, Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A1-A2, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Paul-Smith M, Pytel K, Gelinas J-F, McIntosh J, Pringle I, Davies L, Chan M, Meng C, Bell R, Cammack L, Moran C, Cameron L, Inoue M, Tsugumine S, Hironaka T, Gill D, Hyde S, Nathwani A, Alton E, Griesenbach Uet al., 2018, The murine lung as a factory to produce secreted intrapulmonary and circulatory proteins, Gene Therapy, Vol: 25, Pages: 345-358, ISSN: 0969-7128

We have shown that a lentiviral vector (rSIV.F/HN) pseudotyped with the F and HN proteins from Sendai virus generates high levels of intracellular proteins after lung transduction. Here, we evaluate the use of rSIV.F/HN for production of secreted proteins. We assessed whether rSIV.F/HN transduction of the lung generates therapeutically relevant levels of secreted proteins in the lung and systemic circulation using 1-anti-trypsin (hAAT) and factor VIII (hFVIII) as exemplars. Sedated mice were transduced with rSIV.F/HN carrying either the secreted reporter gene Gaussia luciferase (GLux) or the hAAT or hFVIII cDNAs by nasal sniffing.rSIV.F/HN-hAAT transduction lead to therapeutically relevant hAAT levels (70 g/ml) in ELF, with stable expression persisting for at least 19 months from a single application. Secreted proteins produced in the lung were released into the circulation and stable expression was detectable in blood. The levels of hFVIII in murine blood approached therapeutically relevant targets. rSIV.F/HN was also able to produce secreted hAAT and hFVIII in transduced human primary airway cells.rSIV.F/HN transduction of the murine lungs leads to long-lasting and therapeutically relevant levels of secreted proteins in the lung and systemic circulation. These data broaden the use of this vector platform for a large range of disease indications.

Journal article

Saleh A, Meng C, Chan M, Alton EWFW, Griesenbach Uet al., 2018, RNA in-situ hybridisation is able to quantify lentiviral transduction of respiratory epithelium, Annual Conference of the British-Society-for-Gene-and-Cell-Therapy, Publisher: MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, Pages: A7-A7, ISSN: 1043-0342

Conference paper

Lund-Palau H, Pilou A, Atsumi N, Pringle I, Ashworth RC, Meng C, Chan M, Gill D, Hyde S, Morgan C, Alton EWFW, Griesenbach Uet al., 2018, Lentivirus GM-CSF gene therapy for autoimmune pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, Annual Conference of the British-Society-for-Gene-and-Cell-Therapy, Publisher: MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, Pages: A2-A2, ISSN: 1043-0342

Conference paper

Clarke N, Saleh A, Meng C, Griesenbach U, Alton Eet al., 2018, Validation of a PCR-based assay to quantify lentiviral vector shedding in human body fluids, Annual Conference of the British-Society-for-Gene-and-Cell-Therapy, Publisher: MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, Pages: A11-A11, ISSN: 1043-0342

Conference paper

Griesenbach U, 2018, THE UPS AND DOWNS OF CF GENE THERAPY, Joint 10th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Australian-Gene-and-Cell-Therapy-Society (AGCTS) and Australasian-Society-for-Stem-Cell-Research (ASSCR), Publisher: WILEY, ISSN: 1099-498X

Conference paper

Saleh AD, Clarke NK, Meng C, Jacobson MR, Davies JC, Durham SR, Alton EWFW, Griesenbach Uet al., 2017, DEVELOPMENT OF ASSAYS TO ASSESS SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF LENTIVIRAL GENE THERAPY FOR CYSTIC FIBROSIS, Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A57-A57, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Hippolyte SS, Simmonds NJ, Bilton D, Griesenbach U, Keogh Ret al., 2017, ARE GIRLS ALWAYS THINNER THAN BOYS? USING UK CYSTIC FIBROSIS (CF) REGISTRY DATA (2008-2013) TO EXAMINE WEIGHT CHANGES BETWEEN THE SEXES FROM CHILDHOOD AND BEYOND, Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A76-A77, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Hippolyte SS, Simmonds NJ, Bilton D, Griesenbach U, Keogh Ret al., 2017, DIABETES AND PSEUDOMONAS, A TERRIBLE COMBINATION? EXAMINING THE UK CYSTIC FIBROSIS REGISTRY FOR A SEX DIFFERENCE IN OUTCOMES (2008-2013), Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A2-A3, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Atsumi N, Pilou A, Pringle I, Ashworth RC, Meng C, Chan M, Gill DR, Hyde S, Morgan C, Alton EWFW, Griesenbach Uet al., 2017, GENE THERAPY FOR PULMONARY ALVEOLAR PROTEINOSIS, Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A72-A73, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Paul-Smith MC, Pytel KM, Gelinas J-F, McIntosh J, Pringle I, Davies L, Bell R, Cammack L, Moran C, Cameron L, Inoue M, Tsugumine S, Hironaka T, Gill D, Hyde SC, Nathwani A, Alton E, Griesenbach Uet al., 2017, The lung as a factory to produce secreted intrapulmonary and circulatory proteins, Annual Conference of the British-Society-for-Gene-and-Cell-Therapy / Joint UK-Regenerative-Medicine-Platform Meeting, Publisher: MARY ANN LIEBERT, INC, Pages: A11-A12, ISSN: 1043-0342

Conference paper

Ng-Blichfeldt JP, Alçada J, Montero MA, Dean CH, Griesenbach U, Griffiths MJ, Hind Met al., 2017, Deficient retinoid-driven angiogenesis may contribute to failure of adult human lung regeneration in emphysema, Thorax, Vol: 72, Pages: 510-521, ISSN: 0040-6376

BACKGROUND: Molecular pathways that regulate alveolar development and adult repair represent potential therapeutic targets for emphysema. Signalling via retinoic acid (RA), derived from vitamin A, is required for mammalian alveologenesis, and exogenous RA can induce alveolar regeneration in rodents. Little is known about RA signalling in the human lung and its potential role in lung disease. OBJECTIVES: To examine regulation of human alveolar epithelial and endothelial repair by RA, and characterise RA signalling in human emphysema. METHODS: The role of RA signalling in alveolar epithelial repair was investigated with a scratch assay using an alveolar cell line (A549) and primary human alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells from resected lung, and the role in angiogenesis using a tube formation assay with human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HLMVEC). Localisation of RA synthetic (RALDH-1) and degrading (cytochrome P450 subfamily 26 A1 (CYP26A1)) enzymes in human lung was determined by immunofluorescence. Regulation of RA pathway components was investigated in emphysematous and control human lung tissue by quantitative real-time PCR and Western analysis. RESULTS: RA stimulated HLMVEC angiogenesis in vitro; this was partially reproduced with a RAR-α agonist. RA induced mRNA expression of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and VEGFR2. RA did not modulate AT2 repair. CYP26A1 protein was identified in human lung microvasculature, whereas RALDH-1 partially co-localised with vimentin-positive fibroblasts. CYP26A1 mRNA and protein were increased in emphysema. CONCLUSIONS: RA regulates lung microvascular angiogenesis; the endothelium produces CYP26A1 which is increased in emphysema, possibly leading to reduced RA availability. These data highlight a role for RA in maintenance of the human pulmonary microvascular endothelium.

Journal article

Alton EW, Beekman JM, Boyd AC, Brand J, Carlon MS, Connolly MM, Chan M, Conlon S, Davidson HE, Davies JC, Davies LA, Dekkers JF, Doherty A, Gea-Sorli S, Gill DR, Griesenbach U, Hasegawa M, Higgins TE, Hironaka T, Hyndman L, McLachlan G, Inoue M, Hyde SC, Innes JA, Maher TM, Moran C, Meng C, Paul-Smith MC, Pringle IA, Pytel KM, Rodriguez-Martinez A, Schmidt AC, Stevenson BJ, Sumner-Jones SG, Toshner R, Tsugumine S, Wasowicz MW, Zhu Jet al., 2016, Preparation for a first-in-man lentivirus trial in patients with cystic fibrosis, Thorax, Vol: 72, Pages: 137-147, ISSN: 0040-6376

We have recently shown that non-viral gene therapy can stabilise the decline of lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, the effect was modest, and more potent gene transfer agents are still required. Fuson protein (F)/Hemagglutinin/Neuraminidase protein (HN)-pseudotyped lentiviral vectors are more efficient for lung gene transfer than non-viral vectors in preclinical models. In preparation for a first-in-man CF trial using the lentiviral vector, we have undertaken key translational preclinical studies. Regulatory-compliant vectors carrying a range of promoter/enhancer elements were assessed in mice and human air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures to select the lead candidate; cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance receptor (CFTR) expression and function were assessed in CF models using this lead candidate vector. Toxicity was assessed and 'benchmarked' against the leading non-viral formulation recently used in a Phase IIb clinical trial. Integration site profiles were mapped and transduction efficiency determined to inform clinical trial dose-ranging. The impact of pre-existing and acquired immunity against the vector and vector stability in several clinically relevant delivery devices was assessed. A hybrid promoter hybrid cytosine guanine dinucleotide (CpG)- free CMV enhancer/elongation factor 1 alpha promoter (hCEF) consisting of the elongation factor 1α promoter and the cytomegalovirus enhancer was most efficacious in both murine lungs and human ALI cultures (both at least 2-log orders above background). The efficacy (at least 14% of airway cells transduced), toxicity and integration site profile supports further progression towards clinical trial and pre-existing and acquired immune responses do not interfere with vector efficacy. The lead rSIV.F/HN candidate expresses functional CFTR and the vector retains 90-100% transduction efficiency in clinically relevant delivery devices. The data support the progression of the F/HN-pseudotype

Journal article

Alton EWFW, Boyd AC, Davies JC, Gill DR, Griesenbach U, Harrison PT, Henig N, Higgins T, Hyde SC, Innes JA, Korman MSDet al., 2016, Genetic Medicines for CF: Hype versus Reality, Pediatric Pulmonology, Vol: 51, Pages: S5-S17, ISSN: 8755-6863

Since identification of the CFTR gene over 25 years ago, gene therapy for cystic fibrosis (CF) has been actively developed. More recently gene therapy has been joined by other forms of “genetic medicines” including mRNA delivery, as well as genome editing and mRNA repair-based strategies. Proof-of-concept that gene therapy can stabilize the progression of CF lung disease has recently been established in a Phase IIb trial. An early phase study to assess the safety and explore efficacy of CFTR mRNA repair is ongoing, while mRNA delivery and genome editing-based strategies are currently at the pre-clinical phase of development. This review has been written jointly by some of those involved in the various CF “genetic medicine” fields and will summarize the current state-of-the-art, as well as discuss future developments. Where applicable, it highlights common problems faced by each of the strategies, and also tries to highlight where a specific strategy may have an advantage on the pathway to clinical translation. We hope that this review will contribute to the ongoing discussion about the hype versus reality of genetic medicine-based treatment approaches in CF.

Journal article

Griesenbach U, Davies JC, Alton E, 2016, Cystic fibrosis gene therapy: a mutation-independent treatment, Current Opinion in Pulmonary Medicine, Vol: 22, Pages: 602-609, ISSN: 1531-6971

PURPOSE OF THE REVIEW: Since cloning of the disease-causing gene 27 years ago, the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy has been pursued. Here, we will summarize key findings with a particular focus on recent developments. RECENT FINDINGS: Almost 3 decades of research have highlighted the complexity of lung gene transfer and have generated a body of data that has recently led to the completion of a large phase IIB study. This trial has, for the first time, shown that nonviral gene transfer can, albeit modestly, stabilize lung function in CF and provides the impetus for further development of more potent gene transfer agents. Lentiviral vectors, specifically pseudotyped to enable entry into airway epithelial cells have most recently been developed. Persistent expression after a single dose and the ability to be administered repeatedly suggest that these viral vectors hold promise for the treatment of CF; a first-in-man clinical trial will shortly be initiated. SUMMARY: Although the development of CF gene therapy has been slower than initially anticipated, recent progress has been encouraging and has renewed the interest of academics and industry to pursue lung gene therapy.

Journal article

Pytel KM, Chan M, Meng C, Martinez AR, Boyd CA, Davies JC, Gill DR, Hyde SC, Innes AJ, Alton EWFW, Griesenbach Uet al., 2016, Pre-existing immunity to human parainfluenza virus (hPIV) does not affect rSIV.F/HN-mediated transduction efficiency., Annual Conference of the British Society for Gene and Cell Therapy, Publisher: Mary Ann Liebert, Pages: A19-A19, ISSN: 1557-7422

Conference paper

Paul-Smith MC, Bell RV, Alton WE, Alton EWFW, Griesenbach Uet al., 2016, Gene therapy for cystic fibrosis: recent progress and current aims, Expert Opinion on Orphan Drugs, Vol: 4, Pages: 649-658, ISSN: 2167-8707

Introduction: Since identification of the disease causing gene over 25 years ago, cystic fibrosis (CF) has been at the forefront of gene therapy research. Despite initial optimism, CF gene therapy has proven considerably more challenging than initially anticipated. However, research conducted over the past two decades has clarified the strength and weaknesses of viral and non-viral gene transfer agents for CF gene therapy.Areas covered: The older literature related to CF gene therapy has been reviewed in many publications and we will, therefore, restrict this review to a brief description and discussion of the key lessons learnt, instead focusing on more recent progress in the field which was identified through literature searches. This review will summarize research leading up to the recent pivotal proof-of-concept study showing that non-viral gene therapy can stabilize the decline of lung function in CF patients and also highlight recent advances in viral vector development which may overcome problems related to loss of efficacy on repeated administration.Expert opinion: The demonstration that gene therapy can stabilize CF lung disease is an important milestone in gene therapy.

Journal article

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