Imperial College London

DrVictoriaCornelius

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Senior Lecturer in Clinical Trial Statistics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1218v.cornelius

 
 
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Location

 

111Stadium HouseWhite City

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

71 results found

Wright AJ, McDermott L, Cornelius VR, Burgess C, Forster AS, Ashworth M, Khoshaba B, Conner M, Gulliford MCet al., Can the question-behaviour effect enhance uptake of cardiovascular health checks in primary care?, European Health Psychologist

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bourne S, DeVos R, North M, Chauhan A, Green B, Brown T, Cornelius V, Wilkinson Tet al., 2017, Online versus face-to-face pulmonary rehabilitation for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: randomised controlled trial., BMJ Open, Vol: 7

OBJECTIVE: To obtain evidence whether the online pulmonary rehabilitation(PR) programme 'my-PR' is non-inferior to a conventional face-to-face PR in improving physical performance and symptom scores in patients with COPD. DESIGN: A two-arm parallel single-blind, randomised controlled trial. SETTING: The online arm carried out pulmonary rehabilitation in their own homes and the face to face arm in a local rehabilitation facility. PARTICIPANTS: 90 patients with a diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), modified Medical Research Council score of 2 or greater referred for pulmonary rehabilitation (PR), randomised in a 2:1 ratio to online (n=64) or face-to-face PR (n=26). Participants unable to use an internet-enabled device at home were excluded. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Coprimary outcomes were 6 min walk distance test and the COPD assessment test (CAT) score at completion of the programme. INTERVENTIONS: A 6-week PR programme organised either as group sessions in a local rehabilitation facility, or online PR via log in and access to 'myPR'. RESULTS: The adjusted mean difference for the 6 min walk test (6MWT) between groups for the intention-to-treat (ITT) population was 23.8 m with the lower 95% CI well above the non-inferiority threshold of -40.5 m at -4.5 m with an upper 95% CI of +52.2 m. This result was consistent in the per-protocol (PP) population with a mean adjusted difference of 15 m (-13.7 to 43.8). The CAT score difference in the ITT was -1.0 in favour of the online intervention with the upper 95% CI well below the non-inferiority threshold of 1.8 at 0.86 and the lower 95% CI of -2.9. The PP analysis was consistent with the ITT. CONCLUSION: PR is an evidenced-based and guideline-mandated intervention for patients with COPD with functional limitation. A 6-week programme of online-supported PR was non-inferior to a conventional model delivered in face-to-face sessions in terms of effects on 6MWT distance, and

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Chan S, Cornelius V, Chen T, Radulovic S, Wan M, Jahan R, Lack Get al., 2017, Atopic Dermatitis Anti-IgE Paediatric Trial (ADAPT): the role of anti-IgE in severe paediatric eczema: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial, TRIALS, Vol: 18, ISSN: 1745-6215

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Chen T, Qin R, Wang D, Cornelius Vet al., 2017, Influence of primary outcome change on treatment effect estimates in clinical trials: meta-epidemiological study, Publisher: BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, ISSN: 1745-6215

CONFERENCE PAPER

Craythorne E, Damato E, Pavel M, Cornelius V, Coleman A, Meys R, Mallipeddi Ret al., 2017, Prospective study comparing the use of ex vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy and traditional frozen-section pathology in Mohs micrographic surgery of basal cell carcinoma, 97th Annual Meeting of the British-Association-of-Dermatologists, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 109-109, ISSN: 0007-0963

CONFERENCE PAPER

Forster AS, Cornelius V, Rockliffe L, Marlow LA, Bedford H, Waller Jet al., 2017, A cluster randomised feasibility study of an adolescent incentive intervention to increase uptake of HPV vaccination., Br J Cancer, Vol: 117, Pages: 1121-1127

BACKGROUND: Uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is suboptimal among some groups. We aimed to determine the feasibility of undertaking a cluster randomised controlled trial (RCT) of incentives to improve HPV vaccination uptake by increasing consent form return. METHODS: An equal-allocation, two-arm cluster RCT design was used. We invited 60 London schools to participate. Those agreeing were randomised to either a standard invitation or incentive intervention arm, in which Year 8 girls had the chance to win a £50 shopping voucher if they returned a vaccination consent form, regardless of whether consent was provided. We collected data on school and parent participation rates and questionnaire response rates. Analyses were descriptive. RESULTS: Six schools completed the trial and only 3% of parents opted out. The response rate was 70% for the girls' questionnaire and 17% for the parents'. In the intervention arm, 87% of girls returned a consent form compared with 67% in the standard invitation arm. The proportion of girls whose parents gave consent for vaccination was higher in the intervention arm (76%) than the standard invitation arm (61%). CONCLUSIONS: An RCT of an incentive intervention is feasible. The intervention may improve vaccination uptake but a fully powered RCT is needed.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Forster AS, Cornelius V, Rockliffe L, Marlow LAV, Bedford H, Waller Jet al., 2017, A protocol for a cluster randomised feasibility study of an adolescent incentive intervention to increase uptake of HPV vaccination among girls., Pilot Feasibility Stud, Vol: 3, ISSN: 2055-5784

BACKGROUND: Uptake of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in the UK is good, but there are pockets of the community who remain unprotected. Immunisation teams usually require written parental consent for a girl to receive the vaccine. Evidence suggests that uptake of the vaccine might be improved by promoting consent form return (if returned, forms are likely to grant consent). Incentivising girls to return consent forms is a promising approach to promoting consent form return. Before testing the efficacy of an incentive intervention in a randomised controlled trial (RCT), we must first establish whether the RCT is feasible. In this randomised feasibility study, we aim to establish the feasibility of conducting a cluster RCT of an adolescent incentive intervention to increase uptake of HPV vaccination. METHODS: At least six schools will be randomised to either an incentive intervention arm or a standard invitation arm. Girls in standard invitation arm schools will receive the usual HPV vaccine programme invitation materials. Girls attending schools in the incentive intervention arm will receive the standard invitation and will also be told that they will receive an incentive if they return their consent form (regardless of whether consent is granted or denied). The incentive is being entered into a prize draw to win a retail voucher. Feasibility objectives include estimating the schools' and parents' willingness to participate in the study and be randomised; response rates to questionnaires; the extent of missing data; the girls' and parents' attitudes towards the incentive offered; school staff experiences of participating, fidelity to the trial procedures, data on any unintended consequences and the possible mechanisms of action, and proof-of-concept evidence of the effect of the intervention on consent form return rates and uptake of the vaccine. Analysis of feasibility outcomes will primarily be descriptive. Consent form return rates and uptake of the vaccine

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Harris J, Cornelius V, Ream E, Cheevers K, Armes Jet al., 2017, Anxiety after completion of treatment for early-stage breast cancer: a systematic review to identify candidate predictors and evaluate multivariable model development, SUPPORTIVE CARE IN CANCER, Vol: 25, Pages: 2321-2333, ISSN: 0941-4355

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Howlin RP, Cathie K, Hall-Stoodley L, Cornelius V, Duignan C, Allan RN, Fernandez BO, Barraud N, Bruce KD, Jefferies J, Kelso M, Kjelleberg S, Rice SA, Rogers GB, Pink S, Smith C, Sukhtankar PS, Salib R, Legg J, Carroll M, Daniels T, Feelisch M, Stoodley P, Clarke SC, Connett G, Faust SN, Webb JSet al., 2017, Low-Dose Nitric Oxide as Targeted Anti-biofilm Adjunctive Therapy to Treat Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection in Cystic Fibrosis, MOLECULAR THERAPY, Vol: 25, Pages: 2104-2116, ISSN: 1525-0016

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Love SB, Brown S, Weir CJ, Harbron C, Yap C, Gaschler-Markefski B, Matcham J, Caffrey L, McKevitt C, Clive S, Craddock C, Spicer J, Cornelius Vet al., 2017, Embracing model-based designs for dose-finding trials, BRITISH JOURNAL OF CANCER, Vol: 117, Pages: 332-339, ISSN: 0007-0920

JOURNAL ARTICLE

O'Hagan M, Cornelius V, Young AH, Taylor Det al., 2017, Predictors of rehospitalization in a naturalistic cohort of patients with bipolar affective disorder, INTERNATIONAL CLINICAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, Vol: 32, Pages: 115-120, ISSN: 0268-1315

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Phillips R, Cornelius V, 2017, Lessons to learn from the reporting of adverse events (AEs) in randomised controlled trials published in high impact journals, Publisher: BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, ISSN: 1745-6215

CONFERENCE PAPER

Phillips R, Cornelius V, 2017, Overview of statistical methods to monitor harms during the conduct of a randomised controlled trial, Publisher: BIOMED CENTRAL LTD, ISSN: 1745-6215

CONFERENCE PAPER

Sin J, Gillard S, Spain D, Cornelius V, Chen T, Henderson Cet al., 2017, Effectiveness of psychoeducational interventions for family carers of people with psychosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, Vol: 56, Pages: 13-24, ISSN: 0272-7358

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Tao C, Yu D, Cornelius V, Rui Q, Cai Y, Jiang Z, Zhao Zet al., 2017, Potential health impact and cost-effectiveness of drug therapy for prehypertension, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 240, Pages: 403-408, ISSN: 0167-5273

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Wilkinson T, Bourne S, DeVos R, North M, Chauhan A, Green B, Brown T, Cornelius Vet al., 2017, Online Versus Face To Face Pulmonary Rehabilitation For Patients With COPD: A Randomised Controlled Trial, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF RESPIRATORY AND CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, Vol: 195, ISSN: 1073-449X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Carvajal A, Martin Arias LH, Sainz M, Escudero A, Fierro I, Sauzet O, Cornelius VR, Molokhia Met al., 2016, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome Associated with Oral Bisphosphonates. A Population-Based Cohort Study, PLOS ONE, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hallward G, Balani N, McCorkell S, Roxburgh J, Cornelius Vet al., 2016, The Relationship Between Preoperative Hemoglobin Concentration, Use of Hospital Resources, and Outcomes in Cardiac Surgery, Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia, Vol: 30, Pages: 901-908, ISSN: 1053-0770

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Harris J, Cornelius V, Ream E, Armes Jet al., 2016, Anxiety after treatment for non-metastatic breast cancer: a systematic review to identify risk factors and evaluate multivariate model development, PSYCHO-ONCOLOGY, Vol: 25, Pages: 51-51, ISSN: 1057-9249

JOURNAL ARTICLE

McDermott L, Wright AJ, Cornelius V, Burgess C, Forster AS, Ashworth M, Khoshaba B, Clery P, Fuller F, Miller J, Dodhia H, Rudisill C, Conner MT, Gulliford MCet al., 2016, Enhanced invitation methods and uptake of health checks in primary care: randomised controlled trial and cohort study using electronic health records., Health Technol Assess, Vol: 20, Pages: 1-92

BACKGROUND: A national programme of health checks to identify risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is being rolled out but is encountering difficulties because of low uptake. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness of an enhanced invitation method using the question-behaviour effect (QBE), with or without the offer of a financial incentive to return the QBE questionnaire, at increasing the uptake of health checks. The research went on to evaluate the reasons for the low uptake of invitations and compare the case mix for invited and opportunistic health checks. DESIGN: Three-arm randomised trial and cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: All participants invited for a health check from 18 general practices. Individual participants were randomised. INTERVENTIONS: (1) Standard health check invitation only; (2) QBE questionnaire followed by a standard invitation; and (3) QBE questionnaire with offer of a financial incentive to return the questionnaire, followed by a standard invitation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was completion of the health check within 6 months of invitation. A p-value of 0.0167 was used for significance. In the cohort study of all health checks completed during the study period, the case mix was compared for participants responding to invitations and those receiving 'opportunistic' health checks. Participants were not aware that several types of invitation were in use. The research team were blind to trial arm allocation at outcome data extraction. RESULTS: In total, 12,459 participants were included in the trial and health check uptake was evaluated for 12,052 participants for whom outcome data were collected. Health check uptake was as follows: standard invitation, 590 out of 4095 (14.41%); QBE questionnaire, 630 out of 3988 (15.80%); QBE questionnaire and financial incentive, 629 out of 3969 (15.85%). The increase in uptake associated with the QBE questionnaire was 1.43% [95% confidence interval (CI) -0.12% to 2.97%; p = 0.070]

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dasan S, Gohil P, Cornelius V, Taylor Cet al., 2015, Prevalence, causes and consequences of compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue in emergency care: a mixed-methods study of UK NHS Consultants, EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, Vol: 32, Pages: 588-594, ISSN: 1472-0205

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Mace S, Dzahini O, Cornelius V, Anthony D, Stewart R, Taylor Det al., 2015, Antipsychotic use and unexpected death: a hospital-based case-control study, ACTA PSYCHIATRICA SCANDINAVICA, Vol: 132, Pages: 479-488, ISSN: 0001-690X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Masca NGD, Hensor EMA, Cornelius VR, Buffa FM, Marriott HM, Eales JM, Messenger MP, Anderson AE, Boot C, Bunce C, Goldin RD, Harris J, Hinchliffe RF, Junaid H, Kingston S, Martin-Ruiz C, Nelson CP, Peacock J, Seed PT, Shinkins B, Staples KJ, Toombs J, Wright AKA, Teare MDet al., 2015, RIPOSTE: a framework for improving the design and analysis of laboratory-based research, ELIFE, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2050-084X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Zolkipli Z, Roberts G, Cornelius V, Clayton B, Pearson S, Michaelis L, Djukanovic R, Kurukulaaratchy R, Arshad SHet al., 2015, Randomized controlled trial of primary prevention of atopy using house dust mite allergen oral immunotherapy in early childhood, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 136, Pages: 1541-U174, ISSN: 0091-6749

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Adura PT, Reed E, Macintyre J, del Rosario A, Roberts J, Pestridge R, Beegan R, Boxall CB, Xiao C, Kebadze T, Aniscenko J, Cornelius V, Gern JE, Monk PD, Johnston SL, Djukanovic Ret al., 2014, Experimental rhinovirus 16 infection in moderate asthmatics on inhaled corticosteroids, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 43, Pages: 1186-1189, ISSN: 0903-1936

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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