Imperial College London

DrWilliamMan

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Reader in Respiratory Medicine
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)1895 828 851w.man

 
 
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Location

 

Harefield HospitalHarefield Hospital

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

250 results found

Demeyer H, Mohan D, Burtin C, Vaes AW, Heasley M, Bowler RP, Casaburi R, Cooper CB, Corriol-Rohou S, Frei A, Hamilton A, Hopkinson NS, Karlsson N, Man WD-C, Moy ML, Pitta F, Polkey MI, Puhan M, Rennard SI, Rochester CL, Rossiter HB, Sciurba F, Singh S, Tal-Singer R, Vogiatzis I, Watz H, Lummel RV, Wyatt J, Merrill DD, Spruit MA, Garcia-Aymerich J, Troosters T, Chronic Lung Disease Biomarker and Clinical Outcome Assessment Qualification Consortium Task Force on Physical Activityet al., 2021, Objectively Measured Physical Activity in Patients with COPD: Recommendations from an International Task Force on Physical Activity., Chronic Obstr Pulm Dis, Vol: 8, Pages: 528-550, ISSN: 2372-952X

Physical activity (PA) is of key importance for health among healthy persons and individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). PA has multiple dimensions that can be assessed and quantified objectively using activity monitors. Moreover, as shown in the published literature, variable methodologies have been used to date to quantify PA among individuals with COPD, precluding clear comparisons of outcomes across studies. The present paper aims to provide a summary of the available literature for the rationale behind using objectively measured PA and proposes a standardized methodology for assessment, including standard operating procedures for future research. The present paper, therefore, describes the concept of PA, reports on the importance of PA, summarizes the dimensions of PA, provides a standard operating procedure on how to monitor PA using objective assessments, and describes the psychometric properties of objectively measured PA. The present international task force recommends implementation of the standard operating procedure for PA data collection and reporting in the future. This should further clarify the relationship between PA and clinical outcomes, test the impact of treatment interventions on PA in individuals with COPD, and successfully propose a PA endpoint for regulatory qualification in the future.

Journal article

Nolan CM, Polgar O, Schofield SJ, Patel S, Barker RE, Walsh JA, Ingram KA, George PM, Molyneaux PL, Maher TM, Man WD-Cet al., 2021, Pulmonary rehabilitation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and COPD: a propensity matched real-world study, Chest, ISSN: 0012-3692

BACKGROUND: The adherence to and clinical efficacy of pulmonary rehabilitation in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), particularly in comparison to people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), remains uncertain. The objectives of this real-world study were to compare the responses of patients with IPF with a matched group of patients with COPD undergoing the same supervised, outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation program, and to determine whether pulmonary rehabilitation is associated with survival in IPF. RESEARCH QUESTION: Do people with IPF improve to the same extent with pulmonary rehabilitation as a matched group of individuals with COPD, and are non-completion of and/or non-response to pulmonary rehabilitation associated with one-year all-cause mortality in IPF? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Using propensity score matching, 163 patients with IPF were matched 1:1 with a control group of 163 patients with COPD referred to pulmonary rehabilitation. We compared between-group pulmonary rehabilitation completion rates and response. Survival status in the IPF cohort was recorded over one-year following pulmonary rehabilitation discharge. Cox proportional-hazards regression explored the association between pulmonary rehabilitation status and all-cause mortality. RESULTS: Similar pulmonary rehabilitation completion rates (IPF: 69%; COPD: 63%; p=0.24) and improvements in exercise response were observed in both groups with no significant mean (95% confidence interval (CI)) between-group differences in incremental shuttle walk (ISW) change (2 (-18 to 22) meters). Pulmonary rehabilitation non-completion (hazard ratio (HR) (95%CI) 5.62 (2.24 to 14.08)) and non-response (HR (95%CI) 3.91 (1.54 to 9.93)) were independently associated with increased one-year all-cause mortality in IPF. INTERPRETATION: Compared with a matched group of patients with COPD, this real-word study demonstrates that patients with IPF have similar completion rates and magnitude of response to pul

Journal article

Nolan CM, Walsh JA, Patel S, Barker RE, Polgar O, Maddocks M, Gao W, Wilson R, Fiorentino F, Man Wet al., 2021, Minimal versus specialist equipment in the delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation: protocol for a non-inferiority randomised controlled trial, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Finney LJ, Doughty R, Lovage S, Spurr L, Mehta B, Kemp SV, Chua F, Price LC, Singh S, Man WDCet al., 2021, Lung Function Deficits and Symptom Burden in Survivors of COVID-19 Requiring Mechanical Ventilation, ANNALS OF THE AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY, Vol: 18, Pages: 1740-1743, ISSN: 1546-3222

Journal article

Walsh JA, Barker RE, Kon SSC, Jones SE, Banya W, Nolan CM, Patel S, Polgar O, Haselden BM, Polkey MI, Cullinan P, Man WD-Cet al., 2021, Reply to: Room for methodological improvement in gait speed study for COPD patients., Eur Respir J

Journal article

Barker RE, Kon SS, Clarke SF, Wenneberg J, Nolan CM, Patel S, Walsh JA, Polgar O, Maddocks M, Farquhar M, Hopkinson NS, Bell D, Wedzicha JA, Man WD-Cet al., 2021, COPD discharge bundle and pulmonary rehabilitation referral and uptake following hospitalisation for acute exacerbation of COPD, Thorax, Vol: 76, Pages: 829-831, ISSN: 0040-6376

Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) following hospitalisations for acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD) is associated with improved exercise capacity and quality of life, and reduced readmissions. However, referral for, and uptake of, post-hospitalisation PR are low. In this prospective cohort study of 291 consecutive hospitalisations for AECOPD, COPD discharge bundles delivered by PR practitioners compared with non-PR practitioners were associated with increased PR referral (60% vs 12%, p<0.001; adjusted OR: 14.46, 95% CI: 5.28 to 39.57) and uptake (40% vs 32%, p=0.001; adjusted OR: 8.60, 95% CI: 2.51 to 29.50). Closer integration between hospital and PR services may increase post-hospitalisation PR referral and uptake.

Journal article

Burtin C, Mohan D, Troosters T, Watz H, Hopkinson NS, Garcia-Aymerich J, Moy ML, Vogiatzis I, Rossiter HB, Singh S, Merrill DD, Hamilton A, Rennard SI, Fageras M, Petruzzelli S, Tal-Singer R, Tomaszewski E, Corriol-Rohou S, Rochester CL, Sciurba FC, Casaburi R, Man WD-C, Van Lummel RC, Cooper CB, Demeyer H, Spruit MA, Vaes A, CBQC Task Force on Physical Activityet al., 2021, Objectively Measured Physical Activity as a COPD Clinical Trial Outcome., Chest

BACKGROUND: Reduced physical activity is common in COPD and is associated with poor outcomes. Physical activity is therefore a worthy target for intervention in clinical trials; however, trials evaluating physical activity have used heterogeneous methods. RESEARCH QUESTION: What is the available evidence on the efficacy and/or effectiveness of various interventions to enhance objectively measured physical activity in patients with COPD, taking into account the minimal preferred methodologic quality of physical activity assessment? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: In this narrative review, the COPD Biomarker Qualification Consortium (CBQC) task force searched three scientific databases for articles that reported the effect of an intervention on objectively measured physical activity in COPD. Based on scientific literature and expert consensus, only studies with ≥ 7 measurement days and ≥ 4 valid days of ≥ 8 h of monitoring were included in the primary analysis. RESULTS: Thirty-seven of 110 (34%) identified studies fulfilled the criteria, investigating the efficacy and/or effectiveness of physical activity behavior change programs (n = 7), mobile or electronic-health interventions (n = 9), rehabilitative exercise (n = 9), bronchodilation (n = 6), lung volume reduction procedures (n = 3), and other interventions (n = 3). Results are generally variable, reflecting the large differences in study characteristics and outcomes. Few studies show an increase beyond the proposed minimal important change of 600 to 1100 daily steps, indicating that enhancing physical activity levels is a challenge. INTERPRETATION: Only one-third of clinical trials measuring objective physical activity in people with COPD fulfilled the preset criteria regarding physical activity assessment. Studies showed variable effects on physical activity even when investigating similar interventions.

Journal article

Nolan CM, Patel S, Barker RE, Walsh JA, Polgar O, Maddocks M, George PM, Renzoni EA, Wells AU, Molyneaux PL, Kouranos V, Chua F, Maher TM, Man WD-Cet al., 2021, Muscle stimulation in advanced idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: a randomised placebo-controlled feasibility study., BMJ Open, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 2044-6055

OBJECTIVES: To assess the acceptability of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) of the quadriceps muscles in people with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and to identify whether a future definitive trial is feasible. DESIGN: A randomised, parallel, two-group, participant and assessor-blinded, placebo-controlled feasibility trial with embedded qualitative interviews. SETTING: Outpatient department, Royal Brompton and Harefield Hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-two people with IPF: median (25th, 75th centiles) age 76 (74, 82) years, forced vital capacity 62 (50, 75) % predicted, 6 min walk test distance 289 (149, 360) m. INTERVENTIONS: Usual care (home-based exercise, weekly telephone support, breathlessness management leaflet) with either placebo or active NMES for 6 weeks, with follow-up at 6 and 12 weeks. PRIMARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Feasibility of recruitment and retention, treatment uptake and adherence, outcome assessments, participant and outcome assessor blinding and adverse events related to interventions. SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measures with potential to be primary or secondary outcomes in a definitive clinical trial. In addition, purposively sampled participants were interviewed to capture their experiences and acceptability of the trial. RESULTS: Out of 364 people screened, 23 were recruited: 11 were allocated to each group and one was withdrawn prior to randomisation. Compared with the control group, a greater proportion of the intervention group completed the intervention, remained in the trial blinded to group allocation and experienced intervention-related adverse events. Assessor blinding was maintained. The secondary outcome measures were feasible with most missing data associated with the accelerometer. Small participant numbers precluded identification of an outcome measure suitable for a definitive trial. Qualitative findings demonstrated that trial process and active NMES were acceptable but there were concerns abo

Journal article

Lovage S, Doughty R, Mehta B, Hudson A, Finney L, Singh S, Man Wet al., 2021, Upper Limb Function in Survivors of COVID-19 Requiring Mechanical Ventilation, International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, ISSN: 1073-449X

Conference paper

Walsh JA, Barker RE, Kon SSC, Jones SE, Banya W, Nolan CM, Patel S, Polgar O, Haselden BM, Polkey MI, Cullinan P, Man WD-Cet al., 2021, Gait speed and adverse outcomes following hospitalised exacerbation of COPD, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 58, ISSN: 0903-1936

Four-metre gait speed (4MGS) is a simple physical performance measure and surrogate marker of frailty that is associated with adverse outcomes in older adults. We aimed to assess the ability of 4MGS to predict prognosis in patients hospitalised with acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD).213 participants hospitalised with AECOPD (52% male, mean age and FEV1, 72 years and 35% predicted) were enrolled. 4MGS and baseline demographics were recorded at hospital discharge. All-cause readmission and mortality were collected for 1 y after discharge, and multivariable Cox-proportional hazards regression were performed. Kaplan-Meier and Competing risk analysis was conducted comparing time to all-cause readmission and mortality between 4MGS quartiles.111 participants (52%) were readmitted, and 35 (16%) died during the follow-up period. 4MGS was associated with all-cause readmission, with an adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.868 (95% CI 0.797-0.945; p=0.001) per 0.1 m·s-1 increase in gait speed, and with all-cause mortality with an adjusted subdistribution hazard ratio of 0.747 (95% CI: 0.622-0.898; p=0.002) per 0.1 m·s-1 increase in gait speed. Readmission and mortality models incorporating 4MGS had higher discrimination than age or FEV1% predicted alone, with areas under the receiver operator characteristic curves of 0.73 and 0.80 respectively. Kaplan-Meier and Competing Risk curves demonstrated that those in slower gait speed quartiles had reduced time to readmission and mortality (log rank both p<0.001).4MGS provides a simple means of identifying at-risk patients with COPD at hospital discharge. This provides valuable information to plan post-discharge care and support.

Journal article

Patel S, Palmer MD, Nolan CM, Barker RE, Walsh JA, Wynne SC, Jones SE, Shannon H, Hopkinson NS, Kon SSC, Gao W, Maddocks M, Man WD-Cet al., 2021, Supervised pulmonary rehabilitation using minimal or specialist exercise equipment in COPD: a propensity-matched analysis, Thorax, Vol: 76, Pages: 264-271, ISSN: 0040-6376

BACKGROUND: Many trials supporting the benefits of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) have used specialist exercise equipment, such as treadmills and cycle ergometers. However, access to specialist equipment may not be feasible in some settings. There is growing interest in delivering PR programmes with minimal, low-cost equipment, but uncertainty remains regarding their efficacy compared with programmes using specialist equipment. METHODS: Using propensity score matching, 318 consecutive patients with COPD undergoing supervised PR using minimal equipment (PR-min) were compared 1:1 with a control group of 318 patients with COPD who underwent supervised PR using specialist equipment (PR-gym). A non-inferiority analysis was performed for the primary outcome (incremental shuttle walk (ISW)) and secondary outcomes (Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ)-domain and total scores). RESULTS: Similar improvements in ISW and CRQ-domains were observed in PR-min and PR-gym groups (mean difference ISW: 3 m (95% CI -16 to 9); CRQ-total: 0.9 (95% CI -2.7 to 4.5)). The 95% CI between group differences for ISW and CRQ-total did not cross the predefined non-inferiority margins. However, completion rates were lower in PR-min compared with PR-gym (64% vs 73%; p=0.014). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with COPD, PR delivered using minimal equipment produces clinically significant benefits in exercise capacity and health-related quality of life that are non-inferior to rehabilitation delivered using specialist equipment. This study provides support for the provision of PR using minimal exercise equipment, particularly in areas where access to specialist exercise equipment is limited.

Journal article

Brighton LJ, Evans CJ, Farquhar M, Bristowe K, Kata A, Higman J, Ogden M, Nolan C, Yi D, Gao W, Koulopoulou M, Hasan S, Steves CJ, Man WD-C, Maddocks Met al., 2021, Integrating Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment for people with COPD and frailty starting pulmonary rehabilitation: the Breathe Plus feasibility trial protocol., ERJ Open Research, Vol: 7, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 2312-0541

One in five people with COPD also lives with frailty. People living with both COPD and frailty are at increased risk of poorer health and outcomes, and face challenges to completing pulmonary rehabilitation. Integrated approaches that are adapted to the additional context of frailty are required. The aim of the present study is to determine the feasibility of conducting a randomised controlled trial of an integrated Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment for people with COPD and frailty starting pulmonary rehabilitation. This is a multicentre, mixed-methods, assessor-blinded, randomised, parallel group, controlled feasibility trial ("Breathe Plus"; ISRCTN13051922). We aim to recruit 60 people aged ≥50 with both COPD and frailty referred for pulmonary rehabilitation. Participants will be randomised 1:1 to receive usual pulmonary rehabilitation, or pulmonary rehabilitation with an additional Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment. Outcomes (physical, psycho-social and service use) will be measured at baseline, 90 days and 180 days. We will also collect service and trial process data, and conduct qualitative interviews with a sub-group of participants and staff. We will undertake descriptive analysis of quantitative feasibility outcomes (recruitment, retention, missing data, blinding, contamination, fidelity), and framework analysis of qualitative feasibility outcomes (intervention acceptability and theory, outcome acceptability). Recommendations on progression to a full trial will comprise integration of quantitative and qualitative data, with input from relevant stakeholders. This study has been approved by a UK Research Ethics Committee (ref.: 19/LO/1402). This protocol describes the first study testing the feasibility of integrating a Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment alongside pulmonary rehabilitation, and testing this intervention within a mixed-methods randomised controlled trial.

Journal article

Barker RE, Brighton LJ, Maddocks M, Nolan CM, Patel S, Walsh JA, Polgar O, Wenneberg J, Kon SSC, Wedzicha JA, Man WDC, Farquhar Met al., 2021, Integrating Home-Based Exercise Training with a Hospital at Home Service for Patients Hospitalised with Acute Exacerbations of COPD: Developing the Model Using Accelerated Experience-Based Co-Design, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE, Vol: 16, Pages: 1035-1049, ISSN: 1178-2005

Journal article

Polgar O, Patel S, Walsh JA, Barker RE, Clarke SF, Man WD-C, Nolan CMet al., 2021, Minimal clinically important difference for daily pedometer step count in COPD., ERJ Open Res, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2312-0541

Pedometer step count improves with pulmonary rehabilitation and deteriorates with time. The MCID for improvement and deterioration is 427 and -456 steps, respectively, but there is uncertainty about the reliability of these estimates. https://bit.ly/3ci97Jh.

Journal article

Philip K, Lewis A, Buttery S, Man W, Fancourt D, Polkey M, Hopkinson Net al., 2020, Moving singing for lung health online in response to COVID-19: experience from a randomised controlled trial, BMJ Open Respiratory Research, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2052-4439

IntroductionSinging for Lung Health (SLH) is a popular arts-in-health activity for people with long-term respiratory conditions. Participants report biopsychosocial benefits, however research on impact is limited. The ‘SHIELD trial’, a randomised controlled, single (assessor) blind, trial of 12 weeks SLH vs usual care for people with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) (n=120) was set-up to help to address this. The first group (n=18, 9 singing and 9 controls) started face-to-face (5 sessions) before changing to online delivery (7 sessions) due to COVID-19 related physical distancing measures. As such, the experience of this group is here reported as a pilot study to inform further research in this area. MethodsWe conducted semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis regarding barriers, facilitators and key considerations for transitioning from face-to-face to online delivery. Pilot quantitative outcomes include attendance, pre and post measures of quality of life and disease impact (SF-36, CAT score), breathlessness (MRC breathlessness scale, Dyspnoea-12), depression (PHQ9), anxiety (GAD-7), balance confidence (ABC scale) and physical activity (clinical visit PROactive physical activity in COPD tool, combining subjective rating and actigraphy). ResultsAttendance was 69% overall, (90% of the face-to-face sessions, 53% online sessions). Analysis of semi-structured interviews identified three themes regarding participation in SLH delivered face-to-face and online, these where 1) perceived benefits; 2) digital barriers (online); 3) digital facilitators (online). Findings were summarised into key considerations for optimising transitioning singing groups from face-to-face to online delivery. Pilot quantitative data suggested possible improvements in depression (treatment effect -4.78 PHQ9 points, p< 0.05, MCID 5) and balance confidence (treatment effect +17.21 ABC Scale points, p=0.04, MCID 14.2).Discussion This study identifies key consider

Journal article

Philip K, Adam L, Williams S, Buttery S, Michael P, Man W, Fancourt D, Hopkinson Net al., 2020, Dance for people with chronic respiratory disease: A qualitative study, BMJ Open, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objectives To explore the experiences and perceived impact on health and well-being related to participation in a dance group for people with chronic respiratory disease (CRD).Design An exploratory qualitative study using thematic analysis of semistructured interviews.Setting A community dance group in a UK health centre.Participants Convenience sample of long-term dance group participants.Intervention Weekly community dance sessions designed for people with breathlessness, lasting 75 min, led by a trained community dance leader.Results Convenience sample of eight participants, six females, aged 57–87 years (mean 75), with a median 2-year attendance at weekly dance sessions. Long-term attendance was driven by strongly held beliefs regarding the health and well-being benefits of participation. Four key themes were identified: dance as (1) a holistically beneficial activity, with physical and psychosocial health benefits including improved or maintained physical fitness and psychological well-being, and reduced need for healthcare; (2) an integral part of their life; (3) an enjoyable activity; and (4) a source of deep social cohesion.Conclusions Dance group participants perceived a broad range of health benefits of relevance to the biopsychosocial impacts of their respiratory disease. The themes identified are useful in the ongoing planning and evaluation of dance as a holistic complex intervention for people with CRD. Further research is required to assess the extent of health impacts identified, and how dance might be most effectively placed as an option in the management of CRD.

Journal article

Patel S, Barker R, Walsh J, Polgar O, Nolan C, Man Wet al., 2020, The five-repetition sit-to-stand test (5STS) in patients with bronchiectasis: validity and reponsiveness, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Philip K, Lewis A, Williams S, Buttery S, Polkey M, Man W, Fancourt DY, Hopkinson Net al., 2020, Dance for people with chronic respiratory disease: A qualitative study, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Barker RE, Jones SE, Banya W, Fleming S, Kon SSC, Clarke SF, Nolan CM, Patel S, Walsh JA, Maddocks M, Farquhar M, Bell D, Wedzicha JA, Man WD-Cet al., 2020, Reply to: one step at a time: a phased approach to behavioral treatment development in pulmonary rehabilitation, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 202, Pages: 775-777, ISSN: 1073-449X

Journal article

Patel S, Man WD-C, Roberts NJ, 2020, Informal carers and peer support in pulmonary rehabilitation: an underutilized resource?, Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, Vol: 14, Pages: 213-218, ISSN: 1751-4258

Purpose of review The aim of this review is to discuss the recent literature relating to the involvement of informal carers and peer support in pulmonary rehabilitation.Recent findings Informal carers and peer support have been identified by both patients and healthcare workers as a crucial component in the care of those with chronic respiratory disease at home. Pulmonary rehabilitation, a cornerstone in the management of patients with breathlessness, is limited in its clinical effectiveness by poor referral, uptake and completion rates. Engagement of informal carers and support from peers may help maximize the utilization of pulmonary rehabilitation.Summary This review highlights the need for more good-quality randomized controlled trials in identifying suitable interventions that may increase uptake and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation programmes. Qualitative studies have highlighted the potential for informal carers and peer support to play a key role in the design of research programmes, and in the delivery of pulmonary rehabilitation. This needs to be addressed in future research.

Journal article

Brighton LJ, Bristowe K, Bayly J, Ogden M, Farquhar M, Evans CJ, Man WD, Maddocks Met al., 2020, Experiences of pulmonary rehabilitation in people living with COPD and frailty: a qualitative interview study., Annals of the American Thoracic Society, Vol: 17, Pages: 1213-1221, ISSN: 1546-3222

RATIONALE: People living with both chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and frailty have high potential to benefit from pulmonary rehabilitation but face challenges completing programmes. However, research to understand ways to optimise participation in this group is lacking. OBJECTIVE: To explore the experiences, needs and preferences of people with COPD and frailty referred for out-patient pulmonary rehabilitation. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews with people with COPD and physical frailty, purposively sampled by age, living status, level of frailty, and completion of pulmonary rehabilitation. Thematic analysis with a critical realist perspective was used, involving relevant stakeholders with clinical, academic and lived experience for interpretive rigour. RESULTS: 19 people with COPD and frailty were interviewed, with a median age of 78 years (range 58-88). Nine did not complete their pulmonary rehabilitation programme. Four themes were identified: striving to adapt to multidimensional loss, tensions of balancing support with independence, pulmonary rehabilitation as a challenge worth facing, and overcoming unpredictable disruptions to participation. Participants described constantly adapting to their changing health and resulting multidimensional losses (e.g. functional abilities, relationships, confidence). This involved traversing between independence and seeking support, set against a mismatch between their needs and what support is available. People with COPD and frailty can be highly motivated to participate in pulmonary rehabilitation, despite the physical and mental demands it entails, and report a range of benefits. Yet in the context of changeable health, they must often overcome multiple unpredictable disruptions to completing rehabilitation programmes. Participant determination and flexibility of services can facilitate ongoing attendance, but for some, these unpredictable disruptions erode their motivation to attend. CONCLUSIONS: People wi

Journal article

Patel S, Maddocks M, Man WD-C, 2020, Exercise training in COPD: FITT for purpose?, Chest, Vol: 158, Pages: 9-10, ISSN: 0012-3692

Journal article

Polgar O, Aljishi M, Barker RE, Patel S, Walsh JA, Kon SSC, Man WDC, Nolan CMet al., 2020, Digital habits of PR service-users: Implications for home-based interventions during the COVID-19 pandemic, CHRONIC RESPIRATORY DISEASE, Vol: 17, ISSN: 1479-9723

Journal article

Wynne SC, Patel S, Barker RE, Jones SE, Walsh JA, Kon SS, Cairn J, Loebinger MR, Wilson R, Man WD-C, Nolan CMet al., 2020, Anxiety and depression in bronchiectasis: Response to pulmonary rehabilitation and minimal clinically important difference of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale., Chronic Respiratory Disease, Vol: 17, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 1479-9723

The aims of the study were to evaluate the responsiveness of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-Anxiety (HADS-A) subscale and HADS-Depression (HADS-D) subscale to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in patients with bronchiectasis compared to a matched group of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and provide estimates of the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) of HADS-A and HADS-D in bronchiectasis. Patients with bronchiectasis and at least mild anxiety or depression (HADS-A ≥ 8 or/and HADS-D ≥ 8), as well as a propensity score-matched control group of patients with COPD, underwent an 8-week outpatient PR programme (two supervised sessions per week). Within- and between-group changes were calculated in response to PR. Anchor- and distribution-based methods were used to estimate the MCID. HADS-A and HADS-D improved in response to PR in both patients with bronchiectasis and those with COPD (median (25th, 75th centile)/mean (95% confidence interval) change: HADS-A change: bronchiectasis -2 (-5, 0), COPD -2 (-4, 0); p = 0.43 and HADS-D change: bronchiectasis -2 (-2 to -1), COPD -2 (-3 to -2); p = 0.16). Using 26 estimates, the MCID for HADS-A and HADS-D was -2 points. HADS-A and HADS-D are responsive to PR in patients with bronchiectasis and symptoms of mood disorder, with an MCID estimate of -2 points.

Journal article

Barker RE, Jones SE, Banya W, Fleming S, Kon SSC, Clarke SF, Nolan CM, Patel S, Walsh JA, Maddocks M, Farquhar M, Bell D, Wedzicha JA, Man WD-Cet al., 2020, The effects of a video intervention on post-hospitalization pulmonary rehabilitation uptake: a randomized controlled trial., American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 201, Pages: 1517-1524, ISSN: 1073-449X

RATIONALE: Pulmonary rehabilitation following hospitalizations for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) improves exercise capacity and health-related quality of life, and reduces readmissions. However, post-hospitalization pulmonary rehabilitation uptake is low. To date, no trials of interventions to increase uptake have been conducted. OBJECTIVE: Effect of a co-designed education video as an adjunct to usual care on post-hospitalization pulmonary rehabilitation uptake. METHODS: An assessor- and statistician-blinded randomized controlled trial with nested qualitative interviews of participants in the intervention group. Participants hospitalized with COPD exacerbations were assigned 1:1 to receive either usual care (COPD discharge bundle including pulmonary rehabilitation information leaflet) or usual care plus the co-designed education video delivered via a handheld tablet device at discharge. Randomization used minimization to balance age, sex, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) % predicted, frailty, transport availability and previous pulmonary rehabilitation experience. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The primary outcome was pulmonary rehabilitation uptake within 28 days of hospital discharge. 200 patients were recruited with 196 randomized (51% female, median (interquartile range) FEV1 % predicted 36(27, 48)). Pulmonary rehabilitation uptake was 41% and 34% in the usual care and intervention groups respectively (p=0.37), with no differences in secondary (pulmonary rehabilitation referral and completion) or safety (readmissions and death) endpoints. Six of the fifteen participants interviewed could not recall receiving the video. CONCLUSION: A co-designed education video delivered at hospital discharge did not improve post-hospitalization pulmonary rehabilitation uptake, referral or completion. This article is open access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License 4.0

Journal article

Lewis A, Nolan CM, Man WDC, Kon SSC, Conway Jet al., 2020, Prognostication in COPD using physical function measures: Let's walk before we run away with conclusions, RESPIRATORY MEDICINE, Vol: 167, ISSN: 0954-6111

Journal article

Pavitt M, Tanner RJ, Lewis A, Buttery S, Mehta B, Jefford H, Curtis KJ, Banya W, Husain S, Satkunam K, Shrikrishna D, Man W, Polkey M, Hopkinson Net al., 2020, Oral nitrate supplementation to enhance pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD: ON-EPIC a multi-centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised parallel group study, Thorax, Vol: 75, Pages: 547-555, ISSN: 0040-6376

Rationale Dietary nitrate supplementation has been proposed as a strategy to improve exercise performance, both in healthy individuals and in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We aimed to assess whether it could enhance the effect of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) in COPD.Methods This double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group, randomised controlled study performed at four UK centres, enrolled adults with GOLD grade II-IV COPD and MRC dyspnoea score 3-5 or functional limitation to undertake a twice weekly eight week PR programme. They were randomly assigned (1:1) to either 140mls of nitrate-rich beetroot juice (BRJ) (12.9mmol nitrate), or placebo nitrate-deplete BRJ, consumed three hours prior to undertaking each PR session. Allocation used computer generated block randomisation. Measurements The primary outcome was change in incremental shuttle walk test (ISWT) distance. Secondary outcomes included quality of life, physical activity level, endothelial function via flow mediated dilatation, fat free mass index and blood pressure parameters.Main Results 165 participants were recruited, 78 randomised to nitrate-rich BRJ and 87 randomised to placebo. Exercise capacity increased more with active treatment (n=57) than placebo (n=65); median (IQR) change in ISWT distance +60m (10, 85) vs. +30m (0, 70), (p = 0.027). Active treatment also impacted on systolic blood pressure: Treatment group -5.0mmHg (-5.0, -3.0) vs control +6.0mmHg (-1.0, 15.5) (p<0.0005). No significant serious adverse events or side effects were reported.Conclusions Dietary nitrate supplementation appears to be a well-tolerated and effective strategy to augment the benefits of PR in COPD.

Journal article

Barker RE, Kon SS, Clarke SF, Sivarajah S, Nolan CM, Jones SE, Patel S, Walsh JA, Polgar O, Maddocks M, Farquhar M, Wedzicha JA, Man Wet al., 2020, Predictors of Pulmonary Rehabilitation Referral and Uptake Following Hospitalization for Exacerbations of COPD: A Cohort Study, International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society, Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, ISSN: 1073-449X

Conference paper

Walsh JA, Nolan CM, Al Abbas MM, Patel S, Barker RE, Polgar O, Kon SSC, Maddocks M, Man WDet al., 2020, Sarcopenia in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): Response to Pulmonary Rehabilitation, International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, ISSN: 1073-449X

Conference paper

Patel S, Barker RE, Walsh JA, Polgar O, Maddocks M, Nolan CM, Man Wet al., 2020, Poor Appetite in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD): Prevalence and Clinical Correlates, International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, ISSN: 1073-449X

Conference paper

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