Abdus Salam Postgraduate Prize 2016 Graduation For annual award to a student in the Department of Physics for the best performance in the Quantum Fields and Fundamental Forces MSc CABRERA MARQUEZ Santiago  
Adrian Sutton Prize (£600) Prize for the overall performance in Theory and Simulation of Materials SIROKI Gleb  
Gladys Locke Prize in Applied Optics (£100) For annual award to the student who achieves the best overall performance in the Applied Optics MSc course, taking into account written examinations, laboratory and project work. LAM CHEE YONG Leslei  
WintonWinton Prize for the Best PhD Thesis in Physics (£500) For annual award to the student with the best PhD thesis in Physics using computational methods. WATKINSON Catherine  
Director's Prize (£250) For annual award to the student with the best overall performance in the Plastic Electronics MRES. KILMURRAY Rebecca  
Anne Thorne Thesis Prize (£100) A PhD thesis in experimental physics concerned with the development and / or use of new experimental instrumentation or techniques. CUNLIFFE Samuel  
Anne Thorne Thesis Prize (£100) A PhD thesis in experimental physics concerned with the development and / or use of new experimental instrumentation or techniques. DEVLIN Jack  
Research Prize for best MRes Project in PE CDT (£2500) The MRes in Plastic Electronics will have a prize sponsored by Sigma-Aldrich for best MRes Project MARSCH Adam  
Blackett Laboratory Industry Club Thesis Prize - For 5 years from 2011 (£200) In recognition of doctoral thesis work that has made a significant scientific or technology contribution as measured by peer review publications or patents filed in an area of applied physics. EMMOTT Christopher  
Solid State Thesis Prize - For 5 years from 2011 (£200) In recognition of doctoral thesis work that has made a significant scientific or technology contribution as measured by peer review publications or patents filed in an area of solid state physics. LIN Yen Hung  
Solid State Thesis Prize - For 5 years from 2011 (£200) In recognition of doctoral thesis work that has made a significant scientific or technology contribution as measured by peer review publications or patents filed in an area of solid state physics. MOIA Davide  
Materials Design Graduate Research Prize (ESA)  - For 5 years from 2011 (£600) For annual award to students who make the most significant progress at the early stage assessments. MOLINARI Nicola  
Materials Design Advanced Graduate Research Prize (LSA) For 5 years from 2011 (£600) For annual award to students who make the most significant progress at the late stage assessments. BOLEININGER Max  
Julian Walsh (£200) For Outstanding Contribution to the Life Centre for Doctoral Training in Theory and Simulation of Materials OSTOVARI Farnaz  
Prize for Outstanding Contribution to outreach or public engagement by a student in the Centre for Doctoral Training in Theory and Simulation of Materials for 7 years from 2013 (£200) For Outstanding Contribution to outreach or public engagement by a student in the Centre for Doctoral Training in Theory and Simulation of Materials JAEGER Frederike  
Prize for Major Contribution to the Life of the Centre for Doctoral Training in Theory and Simulation of Materials (£100) For annual award to the student who makes  major non-academic contributions to the success and development of the Centre. WILSON Robert  
AWE PhD Prize per excellence - Prize for innovation in computation or experimental physics on graduation for 5 years from 2013 (£500) Best PhD in the field of High Energy Density, shock regimes and plasma Physics. AWE will provide the department with an annual sum. PIKE Oliver  
Sir Peter Knight Award (£200) Best overall performance in the MRes year by a Controlled Quantum Dynamics Centre   for Doctoral Training student. THOMAS Sarah  
Promotion of MSc in Physics for 5 years from 2014 (£100) Outstanding performance in the MSc in Physics LIN Yin Long  
Springer Theses Prize (Euro 500) Recognizing Outstanding PhD Research SULAIMAN  Ali Haidar   
3 Minute Thesis Competition Internal (£25) 3 Minute Thesis Competition Internal DRIVER Taran  

 

Physics Postgraduate Research Symposium 21/06/2016 Talk Prizes (£200 each)

WinnerGroupJudgeCitation
Rob Wilson CMTH (TSM CDT) Tim Evans

Rob’s talk was well presented like all the talks in LT1. However what made his talk stand out to me was the way he stripped out most of the technical details and made it accessible to a general audience such as myself.

Jack Carter-Gartside EXSS Ray Murray

This session contained many good talks. I would describe three in particular as being excellent “Control over magnetisation states of nanostructures via injection of 360 degree domain walls” by Jack Carter-Gartside, “Semiconductor nanoplasmonics” by Michael Nielsen and “The potential of solar power to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions” by Philip Sandwell. However I’m obliged to choose one of these and the winner is Jack Carter-Gartside. In his work, a magnetic AFM tip is used to modify the chirality of domain walls in cobalt or permalloy nanowires (producing 3600 domain walls).  This offers the possibility to switch the magnetisation states of, for example, at the intersections of a hexagonal nanowire array using a high magnetic field (writing) and subsequent low magnetic field (reading).

Allan Johnson QOLS Martin McCall

Allan’s talk on ‘Long and Short Wavelength Sources for Attosecond Science’ was a model of clarity. Contextualising the attosecond timescale with the study of electron dynamics and electronic-nuclear coupling, Allan explained the significance of Carrier Envelope Phase in attosecond generation and measurement. The lack of coherent sources around 100nm, motivated a method to produce soft-x-ray attosecond pulses that utilized the scaling of harmonic energy with wavelength, and hence the need for long wavelength, few-cycle CEP stable pulse drivers. His work is a significant contribution towards laboratory coherent soft X-ray sources.

Alvaro Sánchez González

QOLS Kenny Weir

In deciding a winner the presentation chosen is particularly noted for its clear and informative introduction to the topic. Though a rather specialised topic it was presented in a manner that was accessible to a broad audience. Building on this it had a very well thought out structure which led the audience from the basic principles, through to the practical issues that exist, how they are currently addressed and the challenges of moving to higher repetition rates. The prize goes to the presentation “The implementation of machine learning to allow ultrafast measurements at x-ray free electron lasers at high repetition rates” by Alvaro SANCHEZ GONZALEZ

Oliver Ettlinger PLAS Matthew Foulkes

The talks in the Blackett 741 session on plasma physics, shock physics, astrophysics and particle physics, were all good. Four or five would have made worthy prize-winners, but the best by a whisker was Oliver Ettlinger’s talk on “Radiation pressure driven ion acceleration from shaped gas jet targets”. This was well paced and clearly delivered, covered enough background material to explain the importance of the work, included plenty of technical content, and presented some fascinating results. It is possible that Oliver’s work may lead to the development of improved injectors for real proton therapy systems.

 A special mention goes to Jack Hare’s work on “Hunting Monsters in the basement of Blackett”, which looks likely to throw new light on the very fundamental mysteries of magnetic reconnection. If these talks had been given a few months later, I suspect he might have been the winner.
Shuai Wang SPAT Heather Graven

Out of seven very engaging talks, covering fires, clouds, hurricanes and supersymmetry, Shuai’s talk stood out in terms of his progress and achievement. He has developed a new model to describe the size, intensity and resulting damage of hurricanes. The new model is based on the underlying physics, has a better predictive power than previous models, and it has no free parameters. He showed an exciting new finding that hurricane damage is most strongly related to vertical wind shear, rather than sea surface temperature as previously assumed. Shuai’s research has implications for understanding the impact of climate change on hurricane damage, presently a controversial topic.

 

Physics Postgraduate Research Symposium 21/06/2016 Poster Prizes (£100 each)

WinnerGroupJudgeCitation
Jonathon Baird HEPP

Jon Marangos

AWE

The winning poster is no 66 by Jonathon Baird. 
Mitesh Patel CMTH (TSM CDT)

Rupert Oulton

Winton Capital

Prize to Mitesh Patel for his work on understanding hydride crack formation in relation to the degradation of nuclear fuel pins.

Honorable mention to Christopher Knight for studies into fluid flow in polydisperse granular media and it's influence on internal erosion.

Pavel Hrmo QOLS (CDT)

Vitali Averbukh

Rennishaw

The winning poster is no 48 by Pavel Hrmo.
Wentao Huang EXSS

Lesley Cohen

Blackett Laboratory Industry Club

Innovative developments of new device geometries enabling transparent solution proceeded dye sensitized ambiplar phototransistors. He wins the prize for clarity of explanation, enthusiasm in communication and good clear and interesting poster.

I would also like to mention the excellent posters I would also consider awarding prizes to include Madeline Morris working on the use of transient absorption spectroscopy to show that ferroelectrics enhance the photogenerated species in BaTiO3, Jameel Marafie for excellent chemical synthesis, and promising long wavelength OLED device performance, Iain Hamilton for excellent clarity of explanation and progress on the role of polymer backbone in conjugated polyelectrolytes, Wlliam Kerridge-Johns on his illuminating explanation of his work on tunable Alexandrite lasers for spaceborne remote sensing, and Toshihiko Shibanuma for a striking poster and impressive developments in use of asymmetric dielectric nanoparticle dimers.