petri dish

Successfully managing projects and programmes throughout their lifecycle.

The Research Project Management team help Imperial's academics apply their knowledge to a plethora of challenges faced by industry - and society in general - to generate substantial impact.

The team ensure the success of each project by managing it throughout its life-cycle and...

  • Ensuring the project meets its key deliverables and stays on budget.
  • Disseminating results and showcasing the project's impact via websites, social media, conferences, workshops and news articles.
  • Managing the finances from invoicing and payment processing, to budget reconciliation.
  • Winding the project down when it reaches completion.

Case studies

BIOSONIC

Novel Mobile Sonification Process for Local Valorisation of Lignocellulosic (Forest) Materials to produce Valuable Chemicals (BIOSONIC) was a European Commission FP7 for SME’s project.

The BioSonic consortium developed a novel ultrasonically-enhanced separation process that does not require high temperatures or pressures and is capable of producing pure wood fractions replacing the current harsh hydrolysis or steam explosion methods, which degrade one or other of the output materials and performs much faster than traditional digestion processes. The BioSonic separation process is targeted to be cost-effective at a small enough scale to allow localised processing to take place.

The project was led by Professor Nilay Shah of Imperial College London.

Our role within Biosonic was to provide support to Imperial College academics involved in the project and as an RTD provider. We also advised BIO-SEP on their role as final consortium coordinator.

To find out more visit bio-sepltd.com.

ETI High Hydrogen

The High Hydrogen project was led by Imperial College and the Health and Safety Laboratory (HSL) and was funded by the Energy Technologies Institute.
 
The project investigated the safe operating conditions for power generating systems running on high hydrogen fuel compositions, which may be hazardous in the event of flammable fuel mixtures unintentionally entering the hot exhaust system where they may ignite.
 
At Imperial College, the project was led by Professor Hans Michels in the role of Chief Technology Officer with the collaboration of Professor Peter Lindstedt
 
Our role was to provide project management support to the Imperial College academics involved in the project.
 

EUCLIDS

The Childhood Life-threatening Infectious Disease Study (EUCLIDS) was a €12million project funded under the Health theme of the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), supporting research and innovation.  
 
Using bacterial meningitis and sepsis as prototypic models, EUCLIDS undertook a large scale genomic study (patient database included 84,800 patients with complete data, from hospitals in Europe and West Africa) to identify genes biological pathways that may determine susceptibility and severity of life threatening bacterial infections, currently accounting for over a quarter of child deaths, globally.
 
The project was led by Professor Mike Levin of Imperial College London and the consortium was made up of 16 partners spread across three continents.
 
Research Project Management's role within EUCLIDS focused on providing effective consortium management throughout the project, ensuring effective partner communication and timely implementation of deliverables. We also led and facilitated dissemination and training activities, organised project events and managed the project website.
 
Find out more at the EUCLIDS website.

FSA

FSA

Funded by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) under the Organic Environmental Contaminants Research Programme this project was led by Imperial College with University of Reading and FERA as collaborators. It aimed to investigate the transfer of organic contaminants to milk due to cows ingesting waste materials used as bedding or as soil conditioner on pasture. The programme also examined the uptake of organic contaminants by carrots and cereals grown in soil amended with waste-derived soil conditioners.

A variety of waste materials are recycled in agriculture with the benefit of reducing pressure on virgin resources. Recycled waste materials, such as untreated waste wood shavings or paper sludge from paper recycling mills, can be effectively used as animal bedding in livestock production.

The project was led by Professor Stephen R Smith of Imperial College London and was partnered with two other organisations, University of Reading and FERA.

Research Project Management provided the overall project management throughout the duration of the research, ensuring effective partner communication, and timely implementation of deliverables. We also led and facilitated dissemination activities including organising project events and managing the project’s communication activities.

Visit the website at: http://www.foodagrirecycledwaste.org/

Smart Cities

The EIP SCC Smart Cities Project was an initiative of the European Commission and supported by an external High-Level Group. Heterogeneous expert groups (cities, industry partners, SME’s, financial and research institutions and others involved in the smart city processes), were supported to develop and implement collaborative cross-country activities in the fields of built environment, urban mobility/transport, urban infrastructures, ICT, urban processes, citizen engagement, business models, public procurement, financing, planning and related urban regulation and standards. 
 
The focus was the deployment of technology and service innovation at scale in the fields of interoperable urban platforms, positive energy blocks, smart electro-mobility solutions and smart mobility services. The project also took into account the enabling roles of collaborative actions such as new business models and financing arrangements, new strategies and tools to increase citizen focus and engagement, new strategies and tools for integrated planning and decision-making. 
 
The project was co-chaired by Professor Goran Strbac of Imperial College London. 
 
The Research Project Management team provided day-to-day management of the Action Cluster SDBE; delivering support to the Platform/Market Place Coordinator and Action Cluster Lead (through stakeholder management, event organisation). We also provided management expertise and advice regarding the implementation of the EIP Platform/Market Place and the roll-out of its Initiatives.   
 

UNIHEAT

uniheat

The Centre of Applied Research "Energy efficient heat exchange and catalysis: UNIHEAT" was a successful international partnership between leading research institutions and industry, which aimed to reduce the amount of energy lost during the crude oil refining process by 15%. The initiative was divided into two programmes: a research programme and an industry engagement programme.

The research programme developed breakthrough technologies in energy efficiency. The programme was the largest of its kind worldwide, integrating cutting edge research conducted by a diverse pool of international experts, from molecular simulation to plant level optimisation, from theory to experiments, from design to operations.

The industry engagement programme ensured relevance and transferability to industry. Industrial partners provided invaluable industrial insight and continue to benefit from the tailored integration of novel, energy efficient technologies into their operations cycles.

The project was led by Cav. Prof Sandro Macchietto of Imperial College London and was partnered with 5 other organisations.

RPM was responsible for the industry engagement programme, leading on the organisation of all external events and stakeholder engagement. RPM also provided project and contracts management, logistics, travel and financial management to the project.

Visit the UNIHEAT website


UNIHEAT IN THE NEWS

UNIHEAT closing event at Imperial College, 26th October 2015

UNIHEAT shortlisted for the Research Project of the Year Award by IChemE Global Awards 2015

“Innovation: better together”, a UNIHEAT four-page article in IChemE’s November issue