All students are advised to register as an NHS patient with a GP practice.

Living in halls

 If you live in halls, you should register with a local NHS doctor (GP) as soon as you have moved in.


HallWhere to register
Beit, Eastside, Evelyn Gardens, Parsons, Pembridge, Southside, Wilson  Imperial College Health Centre
Putney Boathouse  Palace Surgery or Putneymead Medical Practice
Silwood Park  King’s Corner Surgery
Woodward  Cloister Road Surgery 
Xenia  Waterloo Health Centre
 
Summary of the table's contents

You should have received a registration form when you moved into your hall; if you haven’t please ask a member of your hall staff.

You will find full details of the surgery and information on how to register on the surgery websites. You can also speak to the hall staff who will be happy to help.

Living in private accommodation

If you live in private accommodation and your postcode falls within the extended catchment area for the NHS Health Centre in Prince's Gardens, then you can register as a patient there. If you live outside the extended catchment area, you should find a local GP using the NHS Choices website.

You can find information about the Health Centre’s extended catchment area on the surgery website

Vaccinations

We strongly recommend that if you are under 25 years of age, you are vaccinated against meningococcal infection and mumps. These vaccines are offered free to the under 25s.

Although rare, both illnesses occur more commonly amongst university students and both are potentially serious. Meningococcal meningitis can kill and mumps can damage fertility. It is recommended that you have two MMR vaccines (these should be spaced at an interval of at least three months) and one Meningitis C vaccine, to give lifetime cover.

If you have not had all of these, it is very important that you arrange with your GP practice to do so as soon as possible, as the risk of infection is greatest in the first few weeks of term.

If you are uncertain about your vaccination status, it is safer to be given the vaccines again, rather than be potentially unprotected.