Important: Students should not restrict their search for a supervisor to those listed below. Use other sources of information on research groups to find out about possible supervisors. Most UROP research experiences are obtained with staff who do not advertise their availability. However, please also take note of the list of non-participating staff.

UROP Opportunities in the Faculty of Natural Sciences
UROP Opportunities in the Faculty of Natural Sciences
Title of UROP Opportunity (Research Experience) & DetailsExperience required (if any)Contact Details and any further Information

Design of a Novel Neutrino Detector: Neutrino physicists are already measuring physics beyond the Standard Model, whilst the LHC searches for supersymmetry and extra dimensions.

The discovery of neutrino mass and flavour oscillation is the first confirmed observation of physics beyond the Standard Model [1,2]. The next generation of experiments will perform highly sensitive searches for violation of charge-parity (CP) symmetry with neutrinos [3,4]. CP symmetry means that the laws of nature s hould be the same for antimatter seen through a mirror as they are for normal matter. This symmetry is known to be violated by quarks, but at a very small level. If neutrinos violate CP symmetry at a large level, this could explain why the universe is made of matter and not antimatter!

One of the requirements for the success of future experiments is improved understanding of the interactions of neutrinos and antineutrinos with nuclei [5]. This project is to design a new type of detector, comprising a high-pressure gas time-projection-chamber (HPTPC) [6], to make the necessary measurements.

Imperial College is involved in the proposed Hyper-Kamiokande neutrino experiment in Japan [4], which will be the most precise accelerator neutrino oscillation experiment with world-leading sensitivity to νe appearance and νμ disappearance. We are specifically involved in the efforts to design a new near detector capable of measuring neutrino-nucleus interactions with 1% systematic uncertainty.

This project will involve computational work to develop a Monte Carlo simulation of an HPTPC detector, with the goal of optimising the design for neutrino oscillation measurements. The student will learn to use the ROOT and GEANT4 software packages (both use C++) which are standard tools for high energy physics. The end goal of the project is a conceptual detector design suitable for submission to a national lab or funding body. Contact: Dr Morgan Wascko, Dept of Physics, Faculty of Natural Sciences, Blackett Laboratory, Room 525, South Kensington Campus. Tel: 0207 594 1607. Email: m.wascko@imperial.ac.uk

NEW: 10 January, 2019

Investigations of virus-host interactions in vitro and in vivo: The aim of the project is to elucidate the replication mechanism of a novel fungal virus, the first entity found to be infectious as double-stranded RNA. Techniques: molecular cloning, yeast two-hybrid, protein purification.

 No previous skills and experience required. Contact: Dr Ioly Kotta-Loizou, Dept of Life Sciences, South Kensington Campus, Sir Alexander Fleming building, 4th floor. Email: i.kotta-loizou13@imperial.ac.uk

NEW (January 2019)

PLEASE NOTE: THIS OPPORTUNITY HAS BEEN FILLED FOR SUMMER 2019.

Software Support of JUICE magnetometer ground test campaign: We are developing a magnetometer instrument that will fly on ESA’s JUICE space mission to the Jupiter system in 2022.

Arriving at Jupiter in 2030 it will make a tour of the Galilean moons Callisto, Europa and Ganymede. The magnetometer measures the local magnetic field vector and will be used to confirm the presence of oceans buried underneath the lunar surface.

An integral part of delivering a space qualified instrument is the extensive test campaign that is undertaken on ground before launch. We are offering projects to support this test campaign in the area of software and programming. Key tasks will include:

  • Helping to automate detailed testing of the instrument’s software via scripts and existing applications
  • Check existing software for errors and inefficiencies via analysis tools
  • Writing and testing scripts for data decode, display and analysis
  • Working with the engineers to troubleshoot anomalous data and to support and help improve general laboratory test activities

Successful candidates will work closely with the engineering team at the Space Magnetometer Laboratory which has a high international profile having been responsible for providing instrumentation for many ESA and NASA missions including Ulysses, Cassini, and Rosetta.

 

Skills and experience required: some experience of coding is necessary, preferably in Python or C. Experience or interest in microcontrollers (Arduino, Raspberry pi etc.), electronics and programming or scripting using Linux. The candidate must be enthusiastic about instrumentation and be willing to work as part of the team to help deliver a successful test campaign. 

 

Contact details: Alex Strickland, Room 6M59, Dept of Physics, Huxley Building, (South Kensington Campus. Email: a.strickland@imperial.ac.uk . Tel: 0207 594 7764

Preferred Dates:  Summer 2019 (from start of June to end of September)

NEW (January 2019)

PLEASE NOTE: THIS OPPORTUNITY HAS BEEN FILLED FOR SUMMER 2019.

Data analysis of JUICE magnetometer ground test campaign: We are developing a magnetometer instrument that will fly on ESA’s JUICE space mission to the Jupiter system in 2022. Arriving at Jupiter in 2030 it will make a tour of the Galilean moons Callisto, Europa and Ganymede.

An integral part of delivering a space qualified instrument is the extensive test campaign that is undertaken on ground before launch. We are offering projects to support this test campaign. Key tasks will include:

  • Analyse the susceptibility of fluxgate magnetometers to a high frequency radiated B-field.
  • Support the analysis of magnetometer data taken during the on-ground test campaign    including EMC, thermal vacuum and calibration
  • Work with the engineers to troubleshoot anomalous data
  • Support and help improve general laboratory test activities

Successful candidates will work closely with the engineering team at the Space Magnetometer Laboratory which has a high international profile having been responsible to instrumentation for many ESA and NASA missions including Ulysses, Cassini, and Rosetta.

 

Skills and experience required: Some experience of coding is necessary, preferably in MATLAB. Hands on experience with electronics and/or instrumentation hardware is also desirable. The candidate must be enthusiastic about instrumentation and be willing to work as part of the team to help deliver a successful test campaign. 

 

Contact details: Richard Baughen, Room 6M59, Dept of Physics, Huxley Building, (South Kensington Campus). Email: r.baughen@imperial.ac.uk . Tel: 0207 594 7677

Preferred Dates: Summer 2019 (from start of June to end of September)

 

UROP Opportunities in the Faculty of Natural Sciences