We have listed the most common questions about Brexit and studying at Imperial below. If you have further questions, please contact: academic.registrar@imperial.ac.uk

Update: The UK will leave the EU with a deal on 31 January 2020. There will be a transition period until at least 31 December 2020 during which no changes to current arrangements with Europe will take place.

  • This means there will be no change to border arrangements and you can continue to travel as you do now during this time. National identity cards will remain valid to enter the UK during this time, but this is likely to change in 2021 (31 December 2025 for Swiss citizens). We recommend that EU/EEA/Swiss citizens get a passport in as soon as possible if they have not got one already. EU/EEA/Swiss nationals can still apply to the EU settlement scheme to retain their right to live in the UK.

  • There will be no changes to access to Horizon 2020 during 2020. UK researchers will continue to be eligible for funding and should continue to apply, including to ERC grants. There are still over 300 open Horizon 2020 calls. Get in touch with the Imperial EU team to find out more.

Please note: This content is reviewed every week. If there has been an update to the content within the last fortnight there will be an asterisk (*) next to the relevant question. Each answer will display the dates when it was last updated and reviewed, e.g. (Updated 01/10/20 | Reviewed 01/10/20).

EU Settlement Scheme workshop

The International Student Support team is holding a session on the EU Settlement Scheme which will be of interest to EU/EEA and Swiss national students who are currently studying in the UK. This session will look at how to apply for pre-settled / settled status and give attendees an opportunity to ask questions about the process.

Available session (book by following this link):

Wednesday 4 March 2020 (13:00 -14:00)

FAQs for Students

I am a student from the EU/EEA. Can I apply for the EU Settlement Scheme?

You will need to apply for pre-settled or settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme if you wish to retain your right to live, work and/or study in the UK after the UK has left the EU. 

If you have already been resident in the UK before the UK leaves the EU, you should consider protecting your status in the UK by applying for pre-settled or settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme now. The settlement scheme is not just for people wanting to stay in the UK indefinitely: it is the best way for current EU national students to preserve their status in the UK.

You will need to be resident in the UK by 31 December 2020 and apply by 30 June 2021. 

You will be able to apply for settled/pre-settled status through the EU Settlement Scheme Please see the EU Settlement Scheme FAQs for more detail. 

(Updated 14/01/20 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

I have an offer to start a course at Imperial in 2020/21. Will Brexit affect my fee status?

The government has confirmed that for undergraduate or postgraduate students classified with a Home/EU fee status and due to commence their course in the 2020/21 academic year, their tuition fee rates will not change for the full duration of the course.

EU, EEA and Swiss nationals may be eligible for a Home/EU fee status subject to fulfilment of the requirements of The Education (Fees and Awards) (England) Regulations 2007 and their relevant subsequent amendments. This guidance is in relation to individuals intending to commence a course of study with an approved higher education provide in England. After the agreed transition period which will end on 31 December 2020, the tuition fee rates and student finance access for EU, EEA and Swiss national students starting courses at UK universities will depend on the outcome of the UK's exit negotiations and any relevant amendments to the current regulations.

You can find all the latest information on our dedicated webpages for offer holders

(Updated 14/01/20 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

Will my tuition fees change as a result of Brexit?

If you are an undergraduate or postgraduate student classified with a Home/EU fee status and are due to commence your course in the 2019/20 or 2020/21 academic year, your tuition fee rates will not change for the full duration of your course.

EU, EEA and Swiss nationals may be eligible for a Home/EU fee status subject to fulfilment of the requirements of The Education (Fees and Awards) (England) Regulations 2007 and their relevant subsequent amendments. This guidance is in relation to individuals intending to commence a course of study with an approved higher education provide in England. After the agreed transition period which will end on 31 December 2020, the tuition fee rates and student finance access for EU, EEA and Swiss national students starting courses at UK universities will depend on the outcome of the UK's exit negotiations and any relevant amendments to the current regulations.

(Updated 14/01/20 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

Will I have to get a visa?

If there is a Brexit deal, a transition period will apply between the date the UK leaves the EU and 31 December 2020. During this period, you will not need a visa to enter the UK. 

(Updated 14/01/20 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

Can I still apply for Research Council funding for my PhD?

Yes - EU nationals can still apply for Research Council PhD studentships at UK institutions for the academic years 2019/2020 and 2020/21. 

(Updated 04/07/19 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

Can I still receive loans and grants?

Government has confirmed that EU students starting an undergraduate or postgraduate course in 2019/20 and 2020/21 will still be eligible for home fee status and for financial support as per existing rules. 

(Updated 14/01/20 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

Will my UK degree still be recognised in the EU?

UK degrees are recognised in many countries around the world, and there are a number of agreements between different countries that support this. Some of these are not related to the European Union – for example, the Bologna process. Participation in the Bologna Process will remain open to the UK after the withdrawal from the EU.

The recognition of professional qualifications covered by the current MRPQ Directive (architect, dental practitioner, doctor, midwife, nurse, pharmacist and veterinary surgeon) will be at the discretion of member states in case of a no deal. The Brexit White Paper on the future relationship states that the government wants to establish a system on mutual recognition of professional qualifications (MRPQ) that covers the same range of professions as the existing MRPQ Directive. 

(Updated 29/03/19 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

What about Erasmus+ grants and study abroad opportunities?

Latest updates on Erasmus+ and study abroad can be found on the dedicated College Erasmus+ site.

(Updated 08/03/19 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

I am an EU national student currently out of the UK on a study abroad programme. Do I need to return to the UK before the UK leaves the EU?

In order to qualify for settlement under the EU Settlement Scheme (see above), you must not normally have been out of the UK for more than 6 months in any 12 month period. There is an exception to this if you have been undertaking a study abroad year as part of your degree. In this case you must not have been out of the UK for more than 12 consecutive months. You may want to consider returning to the UK early if the length of your study abroad year is going to be longer than 12 months. You don’t need to do this before the UK leaves the EU, but you need to ensure that you have not been out of the UK for more than 12 months before the deadline to apply under the EU Settlement Scheme (30 June 2021).

If you have not been resident in the UK for 5 years, you can still apply for pre-settlement under the EU Settlement Scheme but only if you are resident in the UK by the date the UK leaves the EU (in the event of a no-deal). Therefore, if you are currently outside the UK you may want to consider travelling back in to the UK before the UK leaves the EU in order to be resident here by the relevant date. If you want more advice on your situation, please contact brexit.advice@imperial.ac.uk

(Updated 14/01/20 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

Will travel be affected?

Between the date on which the UK leaves the EU and 31 December 2020, a transition period will apply and all travel will continue as normal. 

(Updated 14/01/20 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

Can EU/EEA graduates from Imperial still take up job offers in the UK?

Yes. There is no immediate change to the UK’s visa policies, including for EU/EEA citizens already living in the UK and for those who wish to come here.

The UK government has committed to protect the rights of EU/EEA citizens and their family members currently living in the UK. This includes the right to live, work and study here and access public services, such as healthcare, and benefits.

To retain these rights, all EU/EEA citizens will need to apply for UK immigration status (either settled or pre-settled status) under the EU Settlement Scheme. Please see the FAQ 'Can I apply for the EU Settlement Scheme' above for more information. If you have already been resident in the UK prior to the day the UK leaves the EU, you should consider protecting your status in the UK by applying for pre-settled or settled status under the EU Settlement Scheme . The settlement scheme is not just for people wanting to stay in the UK indefinitely: it is the best way for current EU national students to preserve their status in the UK. You can find more guidance in our EU Settlement Scheme FAQs.

(Updated 14/01/20 | Reviewed 17/01/20)

I’m concerned about Brexit. What is Imperial doing?

On the morning of the 2016 Brexit referendum result, Imperial’s President Alice Gast made it clear that “Imperial is, and will remain, a European university.” We have lived up to that – and we will do so, whatever political challenges we may face.

 We are working to influence government, officials and politicians in Westminster and Brussels.

  • We want continued access to EU programmes supporting excellent research, and guarantees on the rights of EU citizens.
  • As the UK reviews its entire immigration system, we are campaigning for visa reforms that will offer easier access for international students and recent graduates.
  • We have formed a seed fund to support new European research collaborations and are developing new European partnerships, such as that between Imperial Department of Mathematics and France’s CNRS research agency and Imperial and the Technical University Munich.

Imperial is a European university with global reach. Collaborating across borders with people from different backgrounds, cultures and nationalities is what drives the world’s best universities. It’s why Imperial is the UK’s most international university, and it’s one of reasons we’re among the world’s top ten universities.