Mechanics 2 Fluids

Module aims

The aim of the course is for students to gain an understanding of the basics of fluid mechanics and some of its applications in engineering/medicine/biology/real life. The students also develop their problem solving skills.

Learning outcomes

 Learning Outcomes - Knowledge and Understanding

  • Define key concepts associated with fluids
  • Describe mechanics of fluid flows
  • Interpret results of a calculation

Learning Outcomes - Intellectual Skills

  • Conversion of real problems into mathematical form
  • Methods to solve problems
  • Physical interpretation of results

Learning Outcomes - Practical Skills

  • Problem solving techniques
  • Technical skills for solving equations
Learning Outcomes - Transferable Skills
  • Problem solving
  • Information gathering

Module syllabus

  • The continuum approximation, Eulerian and Lagrangian description of fluid, definitions of fundamental kinematic and thermodynamic fluid properties, state relations for gases
  • Force due to the pressure acting on a surface, hydrostatic pressure, gauge pressure, buoyancy force on a submerged or floating body (Archimedes' laws), stability of submerged or floating body, rigid-body motion of fluid
  • Control volumes, statement of the Reynolds Transport Theorem, and its application to conservation of mass and linear momentum. Non-inertial reference frames. Awareness of conservation of angular momentum and energy. The Bernouilli equation
  • The differential equations of fluid flow: the continuity equation, the momentum equation for a Newtonian fluid. Examples of exact solutions of equations.

Pre-requisites

BE1-HMATH1 Mathematics I BE1-HVAW Mathematical tools, vibrations and waves BE1-HMECH1 Mechanics I (or its predecessor 'Introduction to Mechanics') BE2-HMATH2 Mathematics II Coordinate geometry: - ability to integrate functions over areas and volumes in Cartesian coordinates - understanding of two-dimensional polar coordinates, including how to convert vectors between Cartesian and polar coordinates and how to integrate over an area in polar coordinates - relationship between cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems and Cartesian coordinate systems (explicit conversion formulae for spherical coordinates would be given as n

Teaching methods

Lectures: 18 hours
Study groups: 9 hours

Assessments

Examinations:
●  Written exam: Main Exam; 50% weighting
    Rubrics: Main exam (1 hour). Rubric: The paper has TWO compulsory questions, each worth 100 marks. Marks for questions and parts of questions are shown next to the question. The marks for questions (and parts thereof) are indicative
     Outline answers to past papers will be available
●  Written exam: Mastery exam; 40% weighting
    Rubrics: Mastery Exam (1 hour). Rubric: The paper has three compulsory questions, each worth 100 marks. Marks for questions and parts of questions are shown next to the question. The marks for questions (and parts thereof) are indicative
     Outline answers to past papers will be available

Courseworks:
●  Problem sheet: Problem sheet; 10% weighting; Problems based on course material submitted with Mobius Assessment

Feedback : Coursework is marked with comments provided where students have difficulties. Feedback will be provided on an individual basis during tutorials and in personal conversations with the lecturer.provided on an individual basis during tutorials and in personal conversations with the lecturer.

Reading list

Core

  • Fluid mechanics /

    White, Frank M.

    Eighth edition in SI units., McGraw-Hill Education,

Supplementary

Background

Module leaders

Dr Maria Parkes