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With my team at the Project Management poster presentation.

“The most magnificent Creators don’t want to get together with people who think just like they do. They’re looking for people who have other thoughts, because out of the contradiction, comes ideas that could not be born out of sameness. Your relationships will be ultimately more if you’re not identical twins just “yessing, yessing, yessing” to everything that the other one is about.” Abraham-Hicks

I never liked sameness. For as long as I can remember myself, I was overtaken by an incessant need to match other people’s expectations of me, hold by society stereotypes, paint within the line, and think inside the box. Whereas the scourge of sameness seems to be the dominant state of reality in many cities around the world, it definitely isn’t the case in a global megacity such as London.

Although waking up at 6:30am every morning, squeezing through rushing waves of manic commuters, and walking a ridiculous amount of distance on a daily basis, required some getting used to, there is nothing I find more exhilarating that being surrounded by difference. As the above quote by Abraham-Hicks suggests, our contrasting beliefs and perspectives are indispensible variables in the formulation of new, innovative ideas, which not only spice up our lives, but literally expand the realms of human consciousness.

The next best thing about experiencing the abundant diversity of a city like London, is walking into class every morning to find yourself experiencing the exact same diversity, magnified. Being part of a truly multicultural group of people is my favourite aspect of the MSc Management course at Imperial College Business School. Every conversation you have gives you an insight into a new culture, every acquaintance you make introduces you to a new perspective, and the teamwork coursework provides the necessary social intensity to gradually mold you into a global citizen too. And then life’s no longer about you and the city, for you are now, truly, a different yet indistinguishable part of the city.