Federica Secci

Federica Secci

Programme: Doctoral 2011

Subject / area of research:Organisational theories and health systems

Business School Research Group: Organisation and Management; Healthcare Management

Nationality: Italian

Postgraduate: MSc in Management of Public Administration and International Institutions at Bocconi University, Milan, Italy

Current employment: Research Associate, Faculty of Medicine, Imperial College London

What advice would you give to a prospective student considering joining the Business School’s Doctoral programme?

The Doctoral Programme at the Business School has become stronger over the years to provide students with a deeper understanding of up-to-date theoretical and empirical developments in the relevant fields of research. Doctoral students benefit from a number of internal and external seminars organised by the Research Groups, where international speakers present their recent work or seminal papers. To make the most of it, try to attend as many sessions and seminars as possible. This would make you feel more engaged with the research community and would also be a good opportunity to meet fellow PhD students as well as faculty members and start sharing ideas that will help you shape your research.

What was the most important learning you took away with you from the Business School?

The PhD is a long process, with a lot of ups and downs. In addition, studying towards a doctoral degree at the Business School does not only require commitment; it also forces every student to look beyond the obvious by adopting a number of theoretical lenses to tackle the most different research questions. Despite the challenges, I found this particularly intriguing and extremely important for my career, inside and outside academia.

What do you enjoy most about your current work and what are the main challenges that you face?  

There are three aspects of my current work that I particularly enjoy. The first is that I am able to do exactly what I like. The second one is that being a postdoctoral researcher gives you a lot of flexibility. And the third one is that I am lucky enough to work with a really motivated team of international researchers, which makes the work even more fascinating. On the other hand, the drawback of a research post is that you have to constantly look for new funding opportunities and put a lot of effort in preparing grant applications, which may or may not be successful.

How do you stay connected with others from your Business School alumni network?

I try to attend events organised by the alumni network and I am also directly in touch with a lot of former PhD and MSc students; in fact, I have recently been working with a few of them on different research projects. Since some moved back to their home countries to follow their career path, but we have had a lot of chances to meet up again.

In what way is remaining connected to your alumni network important to you?

I believe it is important to remain connected to the alumni network for various reasons. The most obvious motivation is that you can discover new opportunities to start working with former colleagues or get in touch with the company they work for in case you are looking for a move in your career. Besides, it is always nice to feel part of the same community.