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  • Journal article
    Dekkers G, Rosas F, van Waterschoot T, Vanrumste B, Karsmakers Pet al., 2022,

    Dynamic sensor activation and decision-level fusion in wireless acoustic sensor networks for classification of domestic activities

    , Information Fusion, Vol: 77, Pages: 196-210, ISSN: 1566-2535

    For the past decades there has been a rising interest for wireless sensor networks to obtain information about an environment. One interesting modality is that of audio, as it is highly informative for numerous applications including speech recognition, urban scene classification, city monitoring, machine listening and classifying domestic activities. However, as they operate at prohibitively high energy consumption, commercialisation of battery-powered wireless acoustic sensor networks has been limited. To increase the network's lifetime, this paper explores the joint use of decision-level fusion and dynamic sensor activation. Hereby adopting a topology where processing – including feature extraction and classification – is performed on a dynamic set of sensor nodes that communicate classification outputs which are fused centrally. The main contribution of this paper is the comparison of decision-level fusion with different dynamic sensor activation strategies on the use case of automatically classifying domestic activities. Results indicate that using vector quantisation to encode the classification output, computed at each sensor node, can reduce the communication per classification output to 8 bit without loss of significant performance. As the cost for communication is reduced, local processing tends to dominate the overall energy budget. It is indicated that dynamic sensor activation, using a centralised approach, can reduce the average time a sensor node is active up to 20% by leveraging redundant information in the network. In terms of energy consumption, this resulted in an energy reduction of up to 80% as the cost for computation dominates the overall energy budget.

  • Journal article
    Vermeulen T, Reynders B, Rosas FE, Verhelst M, Pollin Set al., 2021,

    Performance analysis of in-band collision detection for dense wireless networks

    , Eurasip Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking, Vol: 2021, Pages: 1-23, ISSN: 1687-1472

    With the massive growth of wireless networks comes a bigger impact of collisions and interference, which has a negative effect on throughput and energy efficiency. To deal with this problem, we propose an in-band wireless collision and interference detection scheme based on full-duplex technology. To study its performance, we compare its throughput and energy efficiency with the performance of traditional half-duplex and symmetric in-band full-duplex transmissions. Our analysis considers a realistic protocol and overhead modeling, and a measurement-based self-interference model. Our results indicate that our proposed collision detection scheme can provide significant gains in terms of throughput and energy efficiency in large wireless networks. Moreover, when compared to half-duplex and symmetric full-duplex, our analysis shows that this scheme allows up to 45% more nodes in the network for the same energy consumption per bit. These results suggest that this could be an enabling technology towards efficient, dense wireless networks.

  • Journal article
    Kettlun F, Rosas F, Oberli C, 2021,

    A low-complexity channel training method for efficient SVD beamforming over MIMO channels

    , Eurasip Journal on Wireless Communications and Networking, Vol: 2021, Pages: 1-22, ISSN: 1687-1472

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) beamforming is an attractive tool for reducing the energy consumption of data transmissions in wireless sensor networks whose nodes are equipped with multiple antennas. However, this method is often not practical due to two important shortcomings: it requires channel state information at the transmitter and the computation of the SVD of the channel matrix is generally too complex. To deal with these issues, we propose a method for establishing an SVD beamforming link without requiring feedback of actual channel or SVD coefficients to the transmitter. Concretely, our method takes advantage of channel reciprocity and a power iteration algorithm (PIA) for determining the precoding and decoding singular vectors from received preamble sequences. A low-complexity version that performs no iterations is proposed and shown to have a signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) loss within 1 dB of the bit error rate of SVD beamforming with least squares channel estimates. The low-complexity method significantly outperforms maximum ratio combining diversity and Alamouti coding. We also show that the computational cost of the proposed PIA-based method is less than the one of using the Golub–Reinsch algorithm for obtaining the SVD. The number of computations of the low-complexity version is an order of magnitude smaller than with Golub–Reinsch. This difference grows further with antenna array size.

  • Journal article
    Yao Q, Evans T, Chen B, Christensen KIMet al., 2021,

    Higher-order temporal network effects through triplet evolution

    , Scientific Reports, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-17, ISSN: 2045-2322

    We study the evolution of networks through ‘triplets’ — three-node graphlets. We develop a method to compute a transitionmatrix to describe the evolution of triplets in temporal networks. To identify the importance of higher-order interactions inthe evolution of networks, we compare both artificial and real-world data to a model based on pairwise interactions only.The significant differences between the computed matrix and the calculated matrix from the fitted parameters demonstratethat non-pairwise interactions exist for various real-world systems in space and time, such as our data sets. Furthermore,this also reveals that different patterns of higher-order interaction are involved in different real-world situations.To test our approach, we then use these transition matrices as the basis of a link prediction algorithm. We investigate ouralgorithm’s performance on four temporal networks, comparing our approach against ten other link prediction methods.Our results show that higher-order interactions in both space and time play a crucial role in the evolution of networks as wefind our method, along with two other methods based on non-local interactions, give the best overall performance. Theresults also confirm the concept that the higher-order interaction patterns, i.e., triplet dynamics, can help us understandand predict the evolution of different real-world systems.

  • Conference paper
    Rosas FE, Mediano PAM, Gastpar M, 2021,

    Learning, compression, and leakage: Minimising classification error via meta-universal compression principles

    , 2020 IEEE Information Theory Workshop (ITW), Publisher: IEEE, Pages: 1-5

    Learning and compression are driven by the common aim of identifying and exploiting statistical regularities in data, which opens the door for fertile collaboration between these areas. A promising group of compression techniques for learning scenarios is normalised maximum likelihood (NML) coding, which provides strong guarantees for compression of small datasets — in contrast with more popular estimators whose guarantees hold only in the asymptotic limit. Here we consider a NMLbased decision strategy for supervised classification problems, and show that it attains heuristic PAC learning when applied to a wide variety of models. Furthermore, we show that the misclassification rate of our method is upper bounded by the maximal leakage, a recently proposed metric to quantify the potential of data leakage in privacy-sensitive scenarios.

  • Journal article
    Gatica M, Cofré R, Mediano PAM, Rosas FE, Orio P, Diez I, Swinnen SP, Cortes JMet al., 2021,

    High-Order Interdependencies in the Aging Brain.

    , Brain Connect

    Background: Brain interdependencies can be studied from either a structural/anatomical perspective ("structural connectivity") or by considering statistical interdependencies ("functional connectivity" [FC]). Interestingly, while structural connectivity is by definition pairwise (white-matter fibers project from one region to another), FC is not. However, most FC analyses only focus on pairwise statistics and they neglect higher order interactions. A promising tool to study high-order interdependencies is the recently proposed O-Information, which can quantify the intrinsic statistical synergy and the redundancy in groups of three or more interacting variables. Methods: We analyzed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data obtained at rest from 164 healthy subjects with ages ranging in 10 to 80 years and used O-Information to investigate how high-order statistical interdependencies are affected by age. Results: Older participants (from 60 to 80 years old) exhibited a higher predominance of redundant dependencies compared with younger participants, an effect that seems to be pervasive as it is evident for all orders of interaction. In addition, while there is strong heterogeneity across brain regions, we found a "redundancy core" constituted by the prefrontal and motor cortices in which redundancy was evident at all the interaction orders studied. Discussion: High-order interdependencies in fMRI data reveal a dominant redundancy in functions such as working memory, executive, and motor functions. Our methodology can be used for a broad range of applications, and the corresponding code is freely available.

  • Journal article
    Medina-Mardones AM, Rosas FE, Rodríguez SE, Cofré Ret al., 2021,

    Hyperharmonic analysis for the study of high-order information-theoretic signals

    , Journal of Physics: Complexity, Vol: 2, Pages: 1-16, ISSN: 2632-072X

    Network representations often cannot fully account for the structural richness of complex systems spanning multiple levels of organisation. Recently proposed high-order information-theoretic signals are well-suited to capture synergistic phenomena that transcend pairwise interactions; however, the exponential-growth of their cardinality severely hinders their applicability. In this work, we combine methods from harmonic analysis and combinatorial topology to construct efficient representations of high-order information-theoretic signals. The core of our method is the diagonalisation of a discrete version of the Laplace–de Rham operator, that geometrically encodes structural properties of the system. We capitalise on these ideas by developing a complete workflow for the construction of hyperharmonic representations of high-order signals, which is applicable to a wide range of scenarios.

  • Journal article
    Kettner HS, Rosas F, Timmermann C, Kärtner L, Carhart-Harris RL, Roseman Let al., 2021,

    Psychedelic Communitas: intersubjective experience during psychedelic group sessions predicts enduring changes in psychological wellbeing and social connectedness

    , Frontiers in Pharmacology, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1663-9812

    Background: Recent years have seen a resurgence of research on the potential of psychedelic substances to treat addictive and mood disorders. Historically and contemporarily, psychedelic studies have emphasized the importance of contextual elements ('set and setting') in modulating acute drug effects, and ultimately, influencing long-term outcomes. Nevertheless, current small-scale clinical and laboratory studies have tended to bypass a ubiquitous contextual feature of naturalistic psychedelic use: its social dimension. This study introduces and psychometrically validates an adapted Communitas Scale, assessing acute relational experiences of perceived togetherness and shared humanity, in order to investigate psychosocial mechanisms pertinent to psychedelic ceremonies and retreats.Methods: In this observational, web-based survey study, participants (N = 886) were measured across five successive time-points: 2 weeks before, hours before, and the day after a psychedelic ceremony; as well as the day after, and 4 weeks after leaving the ceremony location. Demographics, psychological traits and state variables were assessed pre-ceremony, in addition to changes in psychological wellbeing and social connectedness from before to after the retreat, as primary outcomes. Using correlational and multiple regression (path) analyses, predictive relationships between psychosocial 'set and setting' variables, communitas, and long-term outcomes were explored.Results: The adapted Communitas Scale demonstrated substantial internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92) and construct validity in comparison with validated measures of intra-subjective (visual, mystical, challenging experiences questionnaires) and inter-subjective (perceived emotional synchrony, identity fusion) experiences. Furthermore, communitas during ceremony was significantly correlated with increases in psychological wellbeing (r = 0.22), social connectedness (r = 0.25), and other salient mental health outcomes. Path

  • Journal article
    Szigeti B, Kartner L, Blemings A, Rosas F, Feilding A, Nutt DJ, Carhart-Harris RL, Erritzoe Det al., 2021,

    Self-blinding citizen science to explore psychedelic microdosing

    , eLife, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-26, ISSN: 2050-084X

    Microdosing is the practice of regularly using low doses of psychedelic drugs. Anecdotal reports suggest that microdosing enhances well-being and cognition; however, such accounts are potentially biased by the placebo effect. This study used a ‘self-blinding’ citizen science initiative, where participants were given online instructions on how to incorporate placebo control into their microdosing routine without clinical supervision. The study was completed by 191 participants, making it the largest placebo-controlled trial on psychedelics to-date. All psychological outcomes improved significantly from baseline to after the 4 weeks long dose period for the microdose group; however, the placebo group also improved and no significant between-groups differences were observed. Acute (emotional state, drug intensity, mood, energy, and creativity) and post-acute (anxiety) scales showed small, but significant microdose vs. placebo differences; however, these results can be explained by participants breaking blind. The findings suggest that anecdotal benefits of microdosing can be explained by the placebo effect.

  • Journal article
    Turkheimer FE, Rosas FE, Dipasquale O, Martins D, Fagerholm ED, Expert P, Vasa F, Lord L-D, Leech Ret al., 2021,

    A complex systems perspective on neuroimaging studies of behavior and its disorders

    , The Neuroscientist: reviews at the interface of basic and clinical neurosciences, Pages: 1-18, ISSN: 1073-8584

    The study of complex systems deals with emergent behavior that arises as a result of nonlinear spatiotemporal interactions between a large number of components both within the system, as well as between the system and its environment. There is a strong case to be made that neural systems as well as their emergent behavior and disorders can be studied within the framework of complexity science. In particular, the field of neuroimaging has begun to apply both theoretical and experimental procedures originating in complexity science—usually in parallel with traditional methodologies. Here, we illustrate the basic properties that characterize complex systems and evaluate how they relate to what we have learned about brain structure and function from neuroimaging experiments. We then argue in favor of adopting a complex systems-based methodology in the study of neuroimaging, alongside appropriate experimental paradigms, and with minimal influences from noncomplex system approaches. Our exposition includes a review of the fundamental mathematical concepts, combined with practical examples and a compilation of results from the literature.

  • Journal article
    Sahasranaman A, Jensen HJ, 2021,

    Spread of COVID-19 in urban neighbourhoods and slums of the developing world

    , JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY INTERFACE, Vol: 18, ISSN: 1742-5689
  • Journal article
    Sibani P, Boettcher S, Jensen HJ, 2021,

    Record dynamics of evolving metastable systems: theory and applications

    , European Physical Journal B: Condensed Matter and Complex Systems, Vol: 94, Pages: 1-23, ISSN: 1434-6028

    Record Dynamics (RD) deals with complex systems evolving through a sequence of metastable stages. These are macroscopically distinguishable and appear stationary, except for the sudden and rapid changes, called quakes, which induce the transitions from one stage to the next. This phenomenology is well known in physics as “physical aging”, but from the vantage point of RD, the evolution of a class of systems of physical, biological, and cultural origin is rooted in a hierarchically structured configuration space and can, therefore, be analyzed by similar statistical tools. This colloquium paper strives to present in a coherent fashion methods and ideas that have gradually evolved over time. To this end, it first describes the differences and similarities between RD and two widespread paradigms of complex dynamics, Self-Organized Criticality and Continuous Time Random Walks. It then outlines the Poissonian nature of records events in white noise time-series, and connects it to the statistics of quakes in metastable hierarchical systems, arguing that the relaxation effects of quakes can generally be described by power laws unrelated to criticality. Several different applications of RD have been developed over the years. Some of these are described, showing the basic RD hypothesis and how the log-time homogeneity of quake dynamics, can be empirically verified in a given context. The discussion summarizes the paper and briefly mentions applications not discussed in detail. Finally, the outlook points to possible improvements and to new areas of research where RD could be of use.

  • Journal article
    Rivers R, Evans T, 2020,

    How do we avoid imposing the present on the past when modelling spatial interactions?

    , Documenta Praehistorica, Vol: 47, Pages: 462-475, ISSN: 1318-6701

    Theoretical archaeological modelling for describing spatial interactions often adopts contemporary socioeconomic ideas whose C20th language gets translated into historical behaviour with the simplest of lexicons. This can lead to the impression that the past is like the present. Our intention in this paper is that, when this happens, to strip out as much of the contemporary context as we can, to bring modelling back to basic epistemic propositions. We suggest that although the underlying ontology may be specific to contemporary society the epistemology has much greater generality, leading to essentially the same conclusions without the carapace of intricate economics.

  • Journal article
    Rosas FE, Mediano PAM, Jensen HJ, Seth AK, Barrett AB, Carhart-Harris RL, Bor Det al., 2020,

    Reconciling emergences: An information-theoretic approach to identify causal emergence in multivariate data

    , PLOS COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1553-734X
  • Journal article
    Andersen MM, Schjoedt U, Price H, Rosas FE, Scrivner C, Clasen Met al., 2020,

    Playing with fear: a field study in recreational horror

    , Psychological Science, Vol: 31, Pages: 1497-1510, ISSN: 0956-7976

    Haunted attractions are illustrative examples of recreational fear in which people voluntarily seek out frightening experiences in pursuit of enjoyment. We present findings from a field study at a haunted-house attraction where visitors between the ages of 12 and 57 years (N = 110) were equipped with heart rate monitors, video-recorded at peak scare points during the attraction, and asked to report on their experience. Our results show that enjoyment has an inverted-U-shaped relationship with fear across repeated self-reported measures. Moreover, results from physiological data demonstrate that the experience of being frightened is a linear function of large-scale heart rate fluctuations, whereas there is an inverted-U-shaped relationship between participant enjoyment and small-scale heart rate fluctuations. These results suggest that enjoyment is related to forms of arousal dynamics that are “just right.” These findings shed light on how fear and enjoyment can coexist in recreational horror.

  • Journal article
    Sahasranaman A, Jensen HJ, 2020,

    Poverty in the time of epidemic: A modelling perspective

    , PLoS One, Vol: 15, Pages: 1-16, ISSN: 1932-6203

    We create a network model to study the spread of an epidemic through physically proximate and accidental daily human contacts in a city, and simulate outcomes for two kinds of agents—poor and non-poor. Under non-intervention, peak caseload is maximised, but no differences are observed in infection rates across poor and non-poor. Introducing interventions to control spread, peak caseloads are reduced, but both cumulative infection rates and current infection rates are systematically higher for the poor than for non-poor, across all scenarios. Larger populations, higher fractions of poor, and longer durations of intervention are found to progressively worsen outcomes for the poor; and these are of particular concern for economically vulnerable populations in cities of the developing world. Addressing these challenges requires a deeper, more rigorous understanding of the relationships between structural poverty and epidemy, as well as effective utilization of extant community level infrastructure for primary care in developing cities. Finally, improving iniquitous outcomes for the poor creates better outcomes for the whole population, including the non-poor.

  • Journal article
    Rosas FE, Mediano PAM, Rassouli B, Barrett ABet al., 2020,

    An operational information decomposition via synergistic disclosure

    , Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical, Vol: 53, Pages: 485001-485001, ISSN: 1751-8113

    Multivariate information decompositions hold promise to yield insight into complex systems, and stand out for their ability to identify synergistic phenomena. However, the adoption of these approaches has been hindered by there being multiple possible decompositions, and no precise guidance for preferring one over the others. At the heart of this disagreement lies the absence of a clear operational interpretation of what synergistic information is. Here we fill this gap by proposing a new information decomposition based on a novel operationalisation of informational synergy, which leverages recent developments in the literature of data privacy. Our decomposition is defined for any number of information sources, and its atoms can be calculated using elementary optimisation techniques. The decomposition provides a natural coarse-graining that scales gracefully with the system's size, and is applicable in a wide range of scenarios of practical interest.

  • Journal article
    Herzog R, Mediano PAM, Rosas FE, Carhart-Harris R, Perl YS, Tagliazucchi E, Cofre Ret al., 2020,

    A mechanistic model of the neural entropy increase elicited by psychedelic drugs

    , Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2045-2322

    Psychedelic drugs, including lysergic acid diethylamide and other agonists of the serotonin 2A receptor (5HT2A-R), induce drastic changes in subjective experience, and provide a unique opportunity to study the neurobiological basis of consciousness. One of the most notable neurophysiological signatures of psychedelics, increased entropy in spontaneous neural activity, is thought to be of relevance to the psychedelic experience, mediating both acute alterations in consciousness and long-term effects. However, no clear mechanistic explanation for this entropy increase has been put forward so far. We sought to do this here by building upon a recent whole-brain model of serotonergic neuromodulation, to study the entropic effects of 5HT2A-R activation. Our results reproduce the overall entropy increase observed in previous experiments in vivo, providing the first model-based explanation for this phenomenon. We also found that entropy changes were not uniform across the brain: entropy increased in some regions and decreased in others, suggesting a topographical reconfiguration mediated by 5HT2A-R activation. Interestingly, at the whole-brain level, this reconfiguration was not well explained by 5HT2A-R density, but related closely to the topological properties of the brain's anatomical connectivity. These results help us understand the mechanisms underlying the psychedelic state and, more generally, the pharmacological modulation of whole-brain activity.

  • Journal article
    Hilton B, Sood AP, Evans TS, 2019,

    Predictive limitations of spatial interaction models: a non-Gaussian analysis

    , Scientific Reports, ISSN: 2045-2322

    We present a method to compare spatial interaction models against data basedon well known statistical measures which are appropriate for such models anddata. We illustrate our approach using a widely used example: commuting data,specifically from the US Census 2000. We find that the radiation model performssignificantly worse than an appropriately chosen simple gravity model. Variousconclusions are made regarding the development and use of spatial interactionmodels, including: that spatial interaction models fit badly to data in anabsolute sense, that therefore the risk of over-fitting is small and addingadditional fitted parameters improves the predictive power of models, and thatappropriate choices of input data can improve model fit.

  • Conference paper
    Rosas De Andraca FE, Mediano P, Biehl M, Chandaria S, Polani Det al., 2020,

    Causal Blankets: Theory and Algorithmic Framework

    , ECML/PKDD 2020
  • Journal article
    Cofré R, Herzog R, Mediano PAM, Piccinini J, Rosas FE, Sanz Perl Y, Tagliazucchi Eet al., 2020,

    Whole-brain models to explore altered states of consciousness from the bottom up

    , Brain Sciences, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2076-3425

    The scope of human consciousness includes states departing from what most of us experience as ordinary wakefulness. These altered states of consciousness constitute a prime opportunity to study how global changes in brain activity relate to different varieties of subjective experience. We consider the problem of explaining how global signatures of altered consciousness arise from the interplay between large-scale connectivity and local dynamical rules that can be traced to known properties of neural tissue. For this purpose, we advocate a research program aimed at bridging the gap between bottom-up generative models of whole-brain activity and the top-down signatures proposed by theories of consciousness. Throughout this paper, we define altered states of consciousness, discuss relevant signatures of consciousness observed in brain activity, and introduce whole-brain models to explore the biophysics of altered consciousness from the bottom-up. We discuss the potential of our proposal in view of the current state of the art, give specific examples of how this research agenda might play out, and emphasize how a systematic investigation of altered states of consciousness via bottom-up modeling may help us better understand the biophysical, informational, and dynamical underpinnings of consciousness.

  • Journal article
    Palmieri L, Jensen HJ, 2020,

    The forest fire model: the subtleties of criticality and scale invariance

    , Frontiers in Physics, Vol: 8, Pages: 1-8, ISSN: 2296-424X

    Amongst the numerous models introduced with SOC, the Forest Fire Model (FFM) is particularly attractive for its close relationship to stochastic spreading, which is central to the study of systems as diverse as epidemics, rumors, or indeed, fires. However, since its introduction, the nature of the model's scale invariance has been controversial, and the lack of scaling observed in many studies diminished its theoretical attractiveness. In this study, we analyse the behavior of the tree density, the average cluster size and the largest cluster and show that the model could be of high practical relevance for the activation dynamics seen in brain and rain studies. From this perspective, its peculiar scaling properties should be regarded as an asset rather than a limitation.

  • Journal article
    Chen J, Wang Z, Zhu T, Rosas FEet al., 2020,

    Recommendation algorithm in double-layer network based on vector dynamic evolution clustering and attention mechanism

    , Complexity, Vol: 2020, Pages: 1-19, ISSN: 1076-2787

    The purpose of recommendation systems is to help users find effective information quickly and conveniently and also to present the items that users are interested in. While the literature of recommendation algorithms is vast, most collaborative filtering recommendation approaches attain low recommendation accuracies and are also unable to track temporal changes of preferences. Additionally, previous differential clustering evolution processes relied on a single-layer network and used a single scalar quantity to characterise the status values of users and items. To address these limitations, this paper proposes an effective collaborative filtering recommendation algorithm based on a double-layer network. This algorithm is capable of fully exploring dynamical changes of user preference over time and integrates the user and item layers via an attention mechanism to build a double-layer network model. Experiments on Movielens, CiaoDVD, and Filmtrust datasets verify the effectiveness of our proposed algorithm. Experimental results show that our proposed algorithm can attain a better performance than other state-of-the-art algorithms.

  • Conference paper
    Rosas De Andraca FE, Azari M, Arani A, 2020,

    Mobile Cellular-Connected UAVs: Reinforcement Learning for Sky Limits

    , IEEE Globecom Workshops 2020
  • Journal article
    Evans TS, Calmon L, Vasiliauskaite V, Evans TS, Calmon L, Vasiliauskaite Vet al., 2020,

    Longest path in the price model

    , Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 2045-2322

    The Price model, the directed version of the Barab\'{a}si-Albert model,produces a growing directed acyclic graph. We look at variants of the model inwhich directed edges are added to the new vertex in one of two ways: usingcumulative advantage (preferential attachment) choosing vertices in proportionto their degree, or with random attachment in which vertices are chosenuniformly at random. In such networks, the longest path is well defined and insome cases is known to be a better approximation to geodesics than the shortestpath. We define a reverse greedy path and show both analytically andnumerically that this scales with the logarithm of the size of the network witha coefficient given by the number of edges added using random attachment. Thisis a lower bound on the length of the longest path to any given vertex and weshow numerically that the longest path also scales with the logarithm of thesize of the network but with a larger coefficient that has some weak dependenceon the parameters of the model.

  • Journal article
    Falkenberg M, Lee J-H, Amano S-I, Ogawa K-I, Yano K, Miyake Y, Evans TS, Christensen Ket al., 2020,

    Identifying time dependence in network growth

    , Physical Review & Research International, Vol: 2, Pages: 023352 – 1-023352 – 17, ISSN: 2231-1815

    Identifying power-law scaling in real networks—indicative of preferential attachment—has proved controversial. Critics argue that measuring the temporal evolution of a network directly is better than measuring the degree distribution when looking for preferential attachment. However, many of the established methods do not account for any potential time dependence in the attachment kernels of growing networks, or methods assume that node degree is the key observable determining network evolution. In this paper, we argue that these assumptions may lead to misleading conclusions about the evolution of growing networks. We illustrate this by introducing a simple adaptation of the Barabási-Albert model, the “k2 model,” where new nodes attach to nodes in the existing network in proportion to the number of nodes one or two steps from the target node. The k2 model results in time dependent degree distributions and attachment kernels, despite initially appearing to grow as linear preferential attachment, and without the need to include explicit time dependence in key network parameters (such as the average out-degree). We show that similar effects are seen in several real world networks where constant network growth rules do not describe their evolution. This implies that measurements of specific degree distributions in real networks are likely to change over time.

  • Journal article
    Ciacci A, Falkenberg M, Manani KA, Evans TS, Peters NS, Christensen Ket al., 2020,

    Understanding the transition from paroxysmal to persistent atrial fibrillation

    , Physical Review Research, Vol: 2, Pages: 023311-023311

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common cardiac arrhytmia, characterisedby the chaotic motion of electrical wavefronts in the atria. In clinicalpractice, AF is classified under two primary categories: paroxysmal AF, shortintermittent episodes separated by periods of normal electrical activity, andpersistent AF, longer uninterrupted episodes of chaotic electrical activity.However, the precise reasons why AF in a given patient is paroxysmal orpersistent is poorly understood. Recently, we have introduced the percolationbased Christensen-Manani-Peters (CMP) model of AF which naturally exhibits bothparoxysmal and persistent AF, but precisely how these differences emerge in themodel is unclear. In this paper, we dissect the CMP model to identify the causeof these different AF classifications. Starting from a mean-field model wherewe describe AF as a simple birth-death process, we add layers of complexity tothe model and show that persistent AF arises from the formation of temporallystable structural re-entrant circuits that form from the interaction ofwavefront collisions during paroxysmal AF. These results are compatible withrecent findings suggesting that the formation of re-entrant drivers in fibroticborder zones perpetuates persistent AF.

  • Journal article
    Jensen H, 2020,

    Universality classes and information-theoretic measures of complexity via group entropies

    , Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 2045-2322

    We introduce a class of information measures based on group entropies, allowing us to describe the information-theoreticalproperties of complex systems. These entropic measures are nonadditive, and are mathematically deduced from a seriesof natural axioms. In addition, we require extensivity in order to ensure that our information measures are meaningful. Theinformation measures proposed are suitably defined for describing universality classes of complex systems, each characterizedby a specific state space growth rate function.

  • Journal article
    Palmieri L, Jensen HJ, 2020,

    Investigating critical systems via the distribution of correlation lengths

    , PHYSICAL REVIEW RESEARCH, Vol: 2
  • Journal article
    Vasiliauskaite V, Evans TS, 2020,

    Making communities show respect for order

    , Applied Network Science, Vol: 5, Pages: 1-24, ISSN: 2364-8228

    In this work we give a community detection algorithm in which the communities both respects the intrinsic order of a directed acyclic graph and also finds similar nodes. We take inspiration from classic similarity measures of bibliometrics, used to assess how similar two publications are, based on their relative citation patterns. We study the algorithm’s performance and antichain properties in artificial models and in real networks, such as citation graphs and food webs. We show how well this partitioning algorithm distinguishes and groups together nodes of the same origin (in a citation network, the origin is a topic or a research field). We make the comparison between our partitioning algorithm and standard hierarchical layering tools as well as community detection methods. We show that our algorithm produces different communities from standard layering algorithms.

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Publications

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Note to staff: Publications will appear here automatically if you link your publications under the College's Sympletic Elements system.  This is done under "link to funding" under which you will find an option to find one or more papers which can be paired with an "organisational unit" where you should find the Centre for Complexity Science as one option. Any problems, talk to Tim Evans or the Faculty Web Team.