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  • Conference paper
    Cecil E, Bottle A, Aylin P, 2017,

    ARE MORTALITY ALERTS ASSOCIATED WITH OTHER INDICATORS OF HOSPITAL QUALITY IN ENGLAND? A NATIONAL CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

    , Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, Pages: 14-14, ISSN: 1353-4505
  • Journal article
    Balinskaite V, Bottle R, Sodhi V, Angus R, Brett S, Bennett P, Aylin Pet al., 2017,

    The risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes following non-obstetric surgery during pregnancy. Estimates from a retrospective cohort study of 6.5 million pregnancies

    , Annals of Surgery, Vol: 266, Pages: 260-266, ISSN: 1528-1140

    Objective. To estimate the risk of adverse birth outcomes for women who underwent non-obstetric surgery during pregnancy compared with those who did not. Background. Previous research suggests that non-obstetric surgery occurs during 1%-2% of pregnancies. However, there is limited evidence quantifying risks to the mother or pregnancy of such surgery. Methods. We examined maternity admissions using hospital administrative data collected between 1st April 2002 and 31st March 2012 and identified pregnancies where non-obstetric surgery occurred. We used logistic regression models to determine the adjusted relative risk, attributable risk and number needed to harm of non-obstetric surgical procedures for adverse birth outcomes.Results. We identified 6,486,280 pregnancies. In 47,628 of these pregnancies, non-obstetric surgery had occurred. We found that non-obstetric surgery during pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of adverse birth outcomes, although the attributable risk was generally low. We estimated that every 287 surgical operations were associated with one additional stillbirth, every 31 operations associated with one additional preterm delivery, every 39 operations associated with one additional low birth weight baby, every 25 operations associated with one additional caesarean section, and every 50 operations associated with one additional long inpatient stay.Conclusions. Although we have no means of disentangling the effect of the surgery from the effect of the underlying condition, we found that the risk associated with non-obstetric surgery was relatively low, confirming that surgical procedures during pregnancy are generally safe. We believe that our findings improve upon previous research, and are useful reference points for any discussion of risk with prospective patients.

  • Journal article
    Bottle RA, Chase HE, Aylin P, Loeffler Met al., 2017,

    Does early return to theatre add value to rates of revision at 3 years in assessing surgeon performance for elective hip and knee arthroplasty? A national observational study

    , BMJ Quality & Safety, Vol: 27, Pages: 373-379, ISSN: 2044-5423

    Background Joint replacement revision is the most widely used long-term outcome measure in elective hip and knee surgery. Return to theatre (RTT) has been proposed as an additional outcome measure, but how it compares with revision in its statistical performance is unknown.Methods National hospital administrative data for England were used to compare RTT at 90 days (RTT90) with revision rates within 3 years by surgeon. Standard power calculations were run for different scenarios. Funnel plots were used to count the number of surgeons with unusually high or low rates.Results From 2006 to 2011, there were 297 650 hip replacements (HRs) among 2952 surgeons and 341 226 knee replacements (KRs) among 2343 surgeons. RTT90 rates were 2.1% for HR and 1.5% for KR; 3-year revision rates were 2.1% for HR and 2.2% for KR. Statistical power to detect surgeons with poor performance on either metric was particularly low for surgeons performing 50 cases per year for the 5 years. The correlation between the risk-adjusted surgeon-level rates for the two outcomes was +0.51 for HR and +0.20 for KR, both p<0.001. There was little agreement between the measures regarding which surgeons had significantly high or low rates.Conclusion RTT90 appears to provide useful and complementary information on surgeon performance and should be considered alongside revision rates, but low case loads considerably reduce the power to detect unusual performance on either metric.

  • Journal article
    Rao AM, jones A, Bottle R, Darzi A, Aylin Pet al., 2017,

    A retrospective cohort study of high-impact users among patients with cerebrovascular conditions

    , BMJ Open, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2044-6055

    ObjectiveTo apply group-based trajectory modelling (GBTM) to the hospital administrative data to evaluate, model and visualise trends and changes in the frequency of long-term hospital care use of the subgroups of patients with cerebrovascular conditions.DesignA retrospective cohort study of patients with cerebrovascular conditions.SettingsSecondary care of all patients with cerebrovascular conditions admitted to English National Hospital Service hospitals.ParticipantsAll patients with cerebrovascular conditions identified through national administrative data (Hospital Episode Statistics) and subsequent emergency hospital admissions followed up for 4 years.Main outcome measureAnnual number of emergency hospital readmissions.ResultsGBTM model classified patients with intracranial haemorrhage (n=2605) into five subgroups, whereas ischaemic stroke (n=34208) and transientischaemic attack (TIA) (n=20549) patients were shown to have two conventional groups, low and high impact. The covariates with significant association with high-impact users (17.1%) among ischaemic stroke were epilepsy (OR 2.29), previous stroke (OR 2.18), anxiety/depression (OR 1.63), procedural complication (OR 1.43), admission to intensive therapy unit (ITU) or high dependency unit (HDU) (OR 1.42), comorbidity score (OR 1.36), urinary tract infections (OR 1.32), vision loss (OR 1.32), chest infections (OR 1.25), living alone (OR 1.25), diabetes (OR 1.23), socioeconomic index (OR 1.20), older age (OR 1.03) and prolonged length of stay (OR 1.00). The covariates associated with high-impact users among TIA (20.0%) were thromboembolic event (OR 3.67), previous stroke (OR 2.51), epilepsy (OR 2.25), hypotension (OR 1.86), anxiety/depression (OR 1.63), amnesia (OR 1.62), diabetes (OR 1.58), anaemia (OR 1.55), comorbidity score (OR 1.39), atrial fibrillation (OR 1.27), living alone (OR 1.25), socioeconomic index (OR 1.13), older age (OR 1.04) and prolonged length of stay (OR 1.02). The high-impact users (0.5%

  • Journal article
    Rao AM, Bottle R, Darzi A, Aylin Pet al., 2017,

    Sequence analysis of long-term readmissions among high-impact users of cerebrovascular patients

    , Stroke Research and Treatment, Vol: 2017, ISSN: 2090-8105

    Objective. Understanding the chronological order of the causes of readmissions may help us assess any repeated chain of events among high-impact users, those with high readmission rate. We aim to perform sequence analysis of administrative data to identify distinct sequences of emergency readmissions among the high-impact users. Methods. A retrospective cohort of all cerebrovascular patients identified through national administrative data and followed for 4 years. Results. Common discriminating subsequences in chronic high-impact users () of ischaemic stroke () were “urological conditions-chest infection,” “chest infection-urological conditions,” “injury-urological conditions,” “chest infection-ambulatory condition,” and “ambulatory condition-chest infection” (). Among TIA patients (), common discriminating () subsequences among chronic high-impact users were “injury-urological conditions,” “urological conditions-chest infection,” “urological conditions-injury,” “ambulatory condition-urological conditions,” and “ambulatory condition-chest infection.” Among the chronic high-impact group of intracranial haemorrhage () common discriminating subsequences () were “dementia-injury,” “chest infection-dementia,” “dementia-dementia-injury,” “dementia-urine infection,” and “injury-urine infection.” Conclusion. Although common causes of readmission are the same in different subgroups, the high-impact users had a higher proportion of patients with distinct common sequences of multiple readmissions as identified by the sequence analysis. Most of these causes are potentially preventable and can be avoided in the community.

  • Journal article
    Bouras G, Burns EM, Howell AM, Bottle A, Athanasiou T, Darzi Aet al., 2017,

    Linked hospital and primary care database analysis of the impact of short-term complications on recurrence in laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair

    , HERNIA, Vol: 21, Pages: 191-198, ISSN: 1265-4906

    Objective:To study the effects of short-term complications on recurrence following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair using routine data.Background:Linked primary and secondary care databases can evaluate the quality of inguinal hernia surgery by quantifying short- and long-term outcome together.Methods:Longitudinal analysis of linked primary care (Clinical Practice Research Datalink) and hospital administrative (Hospital Episodes Statistics) databases quantified 30-day complications (wound infection and bleeding) and surgery for recurrence after primary repair performed between 1st April 1997 and 31st March 2012.Results:Out of 41,545 primary inguinal hernia repairs, 10.3% (4296/41,545) were laparoscopic. Complications were less frequent following laparoscopic (1.8%, 78/4296) compared with open (3.5%, 1288/37,249) inguinal hernia repair (p < 0.05). Recurrence was more frequent following laparoscopic (3.5%, 84/2541) compared with open (1.2%, 366/31,859) repair (p < 0.05). Time to recurrence was shorter for laparoscopic (26.4 months SD 28.5) compared with open (46.7 months SD 37.6) repair (p < 0.05). Overall, complications were associated with recurrence (3.2%, 44/1366 with complications; 1.7%, 700/40,179 without complications; p < 0.05). Complications did not significantly increase the risk of recurrence in open hernia repair (OR = 1.49; 95% CI 0.97−2.30, p = 0.069). Complications following laparoscopic repair was significantly associated with increased risk of recurrence (OR = 7.86; 95% CI 3.46−17.85, p < 0.05).Conclusions:Complications recorded in linked routine data predicted recurrence following laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair. Focus must, therefore, be placed on achieving good short-term outcome, which is likely to translate to better longer term results using the laparoscopic approach.

  • Journal article
    Bouras G, Markar SR, Burns EM, Huddy JR, Bottle A, Athanasiou T, Darzi A, Hanna GBet al., 2016,

    The psychological impact of symptoms related to esophagogastric cancer resection presenting in primary care: A national linked database study

    , European Journal of Surgical Oncology, Vol: 43, Pages: 454-460, ISSN: 1532-2157

    BackgroundThe objective was to evaluate incidence, risk factors and impact of postoperative symptoms following esophagogastric cancer resection in primary care.MethodsPatients undergoing esophagogastrectomy for cancer from 1998 to 2010 with linked records in Clinical Practice Research Datalink, Hospital Episodes Statistics and Office of National Statistics databases were studied. The recording of codes for reflux, dysphagia, dyspepsia, nausea, vomiting, dumping, diarrhea, steatorrhea, appetite loss, weight loss, pain and fatigue were identified up to 12 months postoperatively. Psychiatric morbidity was also examined and its risk evaluated by logistic regression analysis.ResultsOverall, 58.6% (1029/1755) of patients were alive 2 years after surgery. Of these, 41.1% had recorded postoperative symptoms. Reflux, dysphagia, dyspepsia and pain were more frequent following esophagectomy compared with gastrectomy (p < 0.05). Complications (OR = 1.40 95%CI 1.00–1.95) and surgical procedure predicted postoperative symptoms (p < 0.05). When compared with partial gastrectomy, esophagectomy (OR = 2.03 95%CI 1.26–3.27), total gastrectomy (OR = 2.44 95%CI 1.57–3.79) and esophagogastrectomy (OR = 2.66 95%CI 1.85–2.86) were associated with postoperative symptoms (p < 0.05). The majority of patients with postoperative psychiatric morbidity had depression or anxiety (98%). Predictors of postoperative depression/anxiety included younger age (OR = 0.97 95%CI 0.96–0.99), complications (OR = 2.40 95%CI 1.51–3.83), psychiatric history (OR = 6.73 95%CI 4.25–10.64) and postoperative symptoms (OR = 1.78 95%CI 1.17–2.71).ConclusionsOver 40% of patients had symptoms related to esophagogastric cancer resection recorded in primary care, and were associated with an increase in postoperative depression and anxiety.

  • Journal article
    D'Lima D, Bottle A, Benn J, 2016,

    A MIXED METHODS INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFICACY OF ORGANISATIONAL LEVEL FEEDBACK FROM INCIDENT REPORTING

    , INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR QUALITY IN HEALTH CARE, Vol: 28, Pages: 32-33, ISSN: 1353-4505
  • Journal article
    Balinskaite V, Bottle A, Aylin P, 2016,

    THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN WEEKEND/WEEKDAY IN-HOSPITAL MORTALITY AND CENTRALISATION OF STROKE SERVICES

    , INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR QUALITY IN HEALTH CARE, Vol: 28, Pages: 16-16, ISSN: 1353-4505
  • Journal article
    Bottle A, Chase H, Aylin P, Loeffler Met al., 2016,

    IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EARLY UNPLANNED RETURN TO THEATRE AND THREE-YEAR REVISION RATES FOR ELECTIVE HIP AND KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY?

    , INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR QUALITY IN HEALTH CARE, Vol: 28, Pages: 5-6, ISSN: 1353-4505

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