Research in surgical robotics has an established track record at Imperial College, and a number of research and commercial surgical robot platforms have been developed over the years. The Hamlyn Centre is a champion for technological innovation and clinical adoption of robotic, minimally invasive surgery. We work in partnership with major industrial leaders in medical devices and surgical robots, as well as developing our own platforms such as the i-Snake® and Micro-IGES platforms. The Da Vinci surgical robot is used extensively for endoscopic radical prostatectomy, hiatal hernia surgery, and low pelvic and rectal surgery, and in 2003, St Mary’s Hospital carried out its first Totally Endoscopic Robotic Coronary Artery Bypass (TECAB).

The major focus of the Hamlyn Centre is to develop robotic technologies that will transform conventional minimally invasive surgery, explore new ways of empowering robots with human intelligence, and develop[ing miniature 'microbots' with integrated sensing and imaging for targeted therapy and treatment. We work closely with both industrial and academic partners in open platforms such as the DVRK, RAVEN and KUKA. The Centre also has the important mission of driving down costs associated with robotic surgery in order to make the technology more accessible, portable, and affordable. This will allow it to be fully integrated with normal surgical workflows so as to benefit a much wider patient population.

The Hamlyn Centre currently chairs the UK Robotics and Autonomous Systems (UK-RAS) Network. The mission of the Network is to to provide academic leadership in Robotics and Autonomous Systems (RAS), expand collaboration with industry and integrate and coordinate activities across the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) funded RAS capital facilities and Centres for Doctoral Training (CDTs).


Citation

BibTex format

@article{Keshavarz:2020:1748-605X/ab8d12,
author = {Keshavarz, M and Wales, DJ and Seichepine, F and Abdelaziz, MEMK and Kassanos, P and Li, Q and Temelkuran, B and Shen, H and Yang, G-Z},
doi = {1748-605X/ab8d12},
journal = {Biomedical Materials},
title = {Induced neural stem cell differentiation on a drawn fiber scaffold-toward peripheral nerve regeneration},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-605X/ab8d12},
volume = {15},
year = {2020}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - To achieve regeneration of long sections of damaged nerves, restoration methods such as direct suturing or autologous grafting can be inefficient. Solutions involving biohybrid implants, where neural stem cells are grown in vitro on an active support before implantation, have attracted attention. Using such an approach, combined with recent advancements in microfabrication technology, the chemical and physical environment of cells can be tailored in order to control their behaviors. Herein, a neural stem cell polycarbonate fiber scaffold, fabricated by 3D printing and thermal drawing, is presented. The combined effect of surface microstructure and chemical functionalization using poly--ornithine (PLO) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) on the biocompatibility of the scaffold, induced differentiation of the neural stem cells (NSCs) and channeling of the neural cells was investigated. Upon treatment of the fiber scaffold with a suspension of DWCNTs in PLO (0.039 gL-1) and without recombinants a high degree of differentiation of NSCs into neuronal cells was confirmed by using nestin, galactocerebroside (GalC) and doublecortin (Dcx) immunoassays. These findings illuminate the potential use of this biohybrid approach for the realization of future nerve regenerative implants.
AU - Keshavarz,M
AU - Wales,DJ
AU - Seichepine,F
AU - Abdelaziz,MEMK
AU - Kassanos,P
AU - Li,Q
AU - Temelkuran,B
AU - Shen,H
AU - Yang,G-Z
DO - 1748-605X/ab8d12
PY - 2020///
SN - 1748-6041
TI - Induced neural stem cell differentiation on a drawn fiber scaffold-toward peripheral nerve regeneration
T2 - Biomedical Materials
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1748-605X/ab8d12
UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32330920
UR - https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-605X/ab8d12
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/79007
VL - 15
ER -