Sofia Pedersen


ed millsCountry of origin
 

France

Programme

MRes Biomedical Research

What were you doing before coming to Imperial?

Natural Sciences (Biological) at the University of Cambridge, UK.

Why did you choose Imperial College?

Its international reputation, its influential research, the diversity of its staff and students and its location in a global city.

What do you enjoy about the course?

The opportunity to lead my own projects in an environment of cutting-edge research.

What do you most appreciate about the Faculty/College?

I particularly appreciate the friendliness and open-mindedness of the members of the College. It's been a privilege to work with people from such diverse backgrounds, with different ways of thinking. It stimulates discussion and better research!

What do you plan to do after you graduate?

I have a place on AstraZeneca's IMED Early Phase Drug Development graduate programme. I look forward to using the research skills I acquired this year in an industrial environment, while continuing to contribute to the biomedical field.

Do you have any tips for future course and scholarship applicants?

For applications: make sure to demonstrate your scientific enthusiasm and aspirations; what is it that would make YOU a particular asset to the College? And don't be afraid to talk proudly about your achievements so far! :-)


Ed Mills


ed millsCountry of origin
 

UK

Programme

MRes in Clinicial Research (Translational Medicine)

What were you doing before coming to Imperial?

Prior to taking up the FoM Master’s Scholarship, I was an NHS doctor, working as a senior specialist registrar in Endocrinology at Hammersmith Hospital.

Why did you choose Imperial College?

I chose Imperial College as it has an international reputation for excellence in research. In addition, as I had been working as a clinician in a hospital affiliated to the college, my transition into full time research was seamless and allowed me to undertake my research project within a team that I knew well from my clinical commitments.

What do you enjoy about the course?

The MRes in Clinical Research (Translational Medicine) provides a solid foundation for independently doing clinical trials, including medical statistics and clinical governance issues. The main focus of the course is undertaking a research project, which I have found most stimulating.

What do you most appreciate about the Faculty/College?

The most exciting thing about the Faculty of Medicine and Imperial College as a whole is that the research undertaken influences people’s daily lives and on a global scale.

What do you plan to do after you graduate?

When my course finishes in October, I’m going to stay in the Dhillo Lab and start my PhD.

Do you have any tips for future course and scholarship applicants?

My biggest tip for the course is about having an early think about what interests you clinically and contacting potential research supervisors at the college before starting – then as soon as you begin the course, you can jump straight in. And for the scholarship, take your time filling out the form so that you don’t miss out anything relevant.


Emma Copland


emma coplandCountry of origin
 

UK

Programme

MSc Epidemiology

What were you doing before coming to Imperial?

Before starting the MSc in Epidemiology, I was studying undergraduate Biological Sciences at Imperial.

Why did you choose Imperial College?

I chose Imperial College for my master's degree primarily because I liked the structure and content of the MSc Epidemiology course. Its reputation as a world-class institution also made Imperial stand out compared to other universities. The location of Imperial in central London also makes for a unique student experience!

What do you enjoy about the course?

One of the best things about the MSc Epidemiology course is that it is very small with only around 20 students, therefore there is a strong sense of community and everyone supports each other. I also like the choice of different optional modules which meant that I could tailor my degree to my interests, and I have learnt lots of useful technical skills.

What do you most appreciate about the Faculty/College?

The quality of the research conducted in the Faculty of Medicine is excellent, so there are great opportunities to get involved in valuable research, either through a masters project or outside of your degree!

What do you plan to do after you graduate?

After I complete my masters course, I will be working as a data analyst and statistical programmer in the Medical Sciences Division of the University of Oxford. Longer term, I hope to undertake a PhD in public health research.

Do you have any tips for future course and scholarship applicants?

The most important thing is to apply for the scholarship, as you have nothing to lose! For both course and scholarship applications make sure you talk about what you hope to gain from the course, and how it fits in with your plans for the future.


Diana Ivaniou


diana ivaniouCountry of origin
 

Romania

Programme

MRes Biomedical Resarch (Biomedical Research stream)

What were you doing before coming to Imperial?

I was doing a BSc in Biomedical Sciences with Honours in Pharmacology at the University of Edinburgh.

Why did you choose Imperial College?

Apart from its academic and research excellence, I also chose Imperial College as it offered a course that perfectly suited my interests.

What do you enjoy about the course?

As I was not decided on what exact research topic to pursue for my graduate studies, I really like being given the opportunity to choose from a high range of projects and the chance of getting a taste of two different research areas in one year. I really enjoy spending 90% of my course conducting research, but also being trained in very diverse techniques and getting a taste of many fields from lectures.

What do you most appreciate about the Faculty/College?

The endless opportunities for collaboration and interaction with people coming from very different backgrounds and working in different fields.

What do you plan to do after you graduate?

I have been offered several opportunities and scholarships for conducting my PhD studies, both at Imperial and Oxbridge, and I am still deciding on which would the best choice for me.

Do you have any tips for future course and scholarship applicants?

Make sure to convey your enthusiasm and passion for the course you are applying to and for science in general.


Yasemin Cole


yasemin coleCountry of origin
 

United States

Programme

Masters of Science in Genomic Medicine

What were you doing before coming to Imperial?

I graduated in May 2016 from the University of North Carolina (USA) with a Bachelor’s Degree. I majored in biology and minored in medical anthropology and chemistry. During the summer, I worked as a laboratory technician in my undergraduate research lab, Jeannette Cook Lab at UNC School of Medicine, where I characterised the cellular phenotypes of multiple Cdt1 variants associated with cancer and Meier-Gorlin syndrome.

Why did you choose Imperial College?

I chose Imperial College London because of the university’s genetics and genomics research excellence and the world-renowned researchers who are leaders in their field. Furthermore, while this master’s course is offered by many universities across the United Kingdom, London is an ideal environment to gain exposure to the application of genomics in the clinical setting (with over 50 hospitals in London). The cultural diversity in London likewise allows for one to understand the social and cultural implications of genomics. All of these components come together to create an enriching scientific and educational environment at Imperial College London.

What do you enjoy about the course?

While it is difficult to narrow down the top highlight of the program, the eclectic nature of the programme stands out. I enjoy gaining depth and breadth of knowledge on the application of genomics in various fields of medicine with students from diverse backgrounds (e.g., physicians, scientists, and college graduates). Learning these topics from experts across multiple departments at Imperial College makes the course rigorous but also intriguing and stimulating.

What do you most appreciate about the Faculty/College?

I most appreciate the wealth of resources available for both personal and professional development within the Faculty of Medicine. Beyond course lectures, there are always seminars and postgraduate events (such as with Postgraduate Connections) which I can attend. This exposure gives me the ability to learn about the latest cutting-edge technologies and genomics research while also exploring my interests and career development.

What do you plan to do after you graduate?

After completing my master’s degree, I will be continuing my passion for precision medicine as a clinical research assistant in the United States. Concurrently, I will be applying to medical schools.

Do you have any tips for future course and scholarship applicants?

Reflect on your previous experiences and how your postgraduate studies at Imperial College London will help you succeed in your prospective career. Be genuine and sincere in your application and illustrate your dedication to the course of study you are applying to. It also never hurts to read about the latest scientific advancements and discoveries in your field of study.


Iva Filipovic


County of origin Iva Filipovic

Serbia

Programme

MSc in Immunology

What were you doing before coming to Imperial?

I graduated with a First Class Honours degree in Molecular Biology with Physiology at the University of Belgrade, Serbia.

Why did you choose Imperial College?

While completing my undergraduate degree I became fascinated with the field of immunology when confronted by the question: why is a fetus, carrying MHC molecules derived from the father, and other foreign antigens, not rejected by the mother? In order to gain better experience of the immunological aspects of pregnancy, I applied for M.Sc. in Immunology at Imperial College. This was a logical choice as Imperial’s M.Sc. in Immunology is a world renowned and well-established programme that offers an excellent foundation for a career in research. Another advantage is that the lectures and practicals are at the Hammersmith campus, which is a medical campus, so we get to experience ‘bench-to-bedside’ approach to science and medicine, through lectures from clinicians, in addition to basic scientists.

What do you enjoy about the course?

Course is ideally organised: 2 weeks of lectures and lab practicals, followed by 1 week of self-directed studying through 3rd week tasks, such as research poster design, which teaches you transferable skills useful in any stage of your career.

What do you appreciate most about the Faculty/College?

All the lecturers and lab managers are extremely helpful – they are always there for you, no matter whether you need their help in the lecture, or afterwards during your home study. They quickly respond to your emails and support you continuously as they want to see you succeed. Facilities at the Hammersmith campus are amazing. We have a postgraduate common room, where all postgraduate students can relax, have lunch, socialise, or work on group projects for the course. Fresh coffee at the Ex Libris café also deserves appraisal and helps you get through a full day of lectures.

What do you plan to do after you graduate?

I have been awarded a graduate studentship at the University of Cambridge, so in October this year I am starting a PhD project in the field of reproductive immunology. My M.Sc. project at Imperial College is providing me with the best training for this PhD project as the lab I will join in Cambridge is collaborating with my host lab at Imperial – therefore I am hoping to maintain the collaboration between my current and future University.

Do you have any tips for future course and scholarship applicants?

Definitely apply! Immunology is such an exciting field! However, be prepared to study hard and make the most of all the opportunities you are given by the lecturers during your course.