Report summaries languages

English

21 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 6: Relative sensitivity of international surveillance

(Download Report 6)

Sangeeta Bhatia, Natsuko Imai, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Marc Baguelin, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Hayley Thompson, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Charlie Whittaker, Xiaoyue Xi, Christl A. Donnelly1, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: c.donnelly@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 6
Since the start of the COVID-19 epidemic in late 2019, there are now 29 affected regions and countries with over 1000 confirmed cases outside of mainland China. In previous reports, we estimated the likely epidemic size in Wuhan City based on air traffic volumes and the number of detected cases internationally. Here we analysed COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China to different regions and countries, comparing the country-specific rates of detected and confirmed cases per flight volume to estimate the relative sensitivity of surveillance in different countries. Although travel restrictions from Wuhan City and other cities across China may have reduced the absolute number of travellers to and from China, we estimated that about two thirds of COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China have remained undetected worldwide, potentially resulting in multiple chains of as yet undetected human-to-human transmission outside mainland China.

Appendix data sources
Data on cases in international travellers: international_cases_2020_21_02.csv

中文 - Mandarin

21 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 6: Relative sensitivity of international surveillance

(Download Report 6)

Sangeeta Bhatia, Natsuko Imai, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Marc Baguelin, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Hayley Thompson, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Charlie Whittaker, Xiaoyue Xi, Christl A. Donnelly1, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: c.donnelly@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 6 - translation will be available shortly
Since the start of the COVID-19 epidemic in late 2019, there are now 29 affected countries with over 1000 confirmed cases outside of mainland China. In previous reports, we estimated the likely epidemic size in Wuhan City based on air traffic volumes and the number of detected cases internationally. Here we analysed COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China to different regions and countries, comparing the country-specific rates of detected and confirmed cases per flight volume to estimate the relative sensitivity of surveillance in different countries. Although travel restrictions from Wuhan City and other cities across China may have reduced the absolute number of travellers to and from China, we estimated that about two thirds of COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China have remained undetected worldwide, potentially resulting in multiple chains of as yet undetected human-to-human transmission outside mainland China.

Appendix data sources
Data on cases in international travellers: international_cases_2020_21_02.csv

日本語 - Japanese

21 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 6: Relative sensitivity of international surveillance

(Download Report 6)

Sangeeta Bhatia, Natsuko Imai, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Marc Baguelin, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Hayley Thompson, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Charlie Whittaker, Xiaoyue Xi, Christl A. Donnelly1, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: c.donnelly@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 6 - translation will be available shortly
Since the start of the COVID-19 epidemic in late 2019, there are now 29 affected countries with over 1000 confirmed cases outside of mainland China. In previous reports, we estimated the likely epidemic size in Wuhan City based on air traffic volumes and the number of detected cases internationally. Here we analysed COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China to different regions and countries, comparing the country-specific rates of detected and confirmed cases per flight volume to estimate the relative sensitivity of surveillance in different countries. Although travel restrictions from Wuhan City and other cities across China may have reduced the absolute number of travellers to and from China, we estimated that about two thirds of COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China have remained undetected worldwide, potentially resulting in multiple chains of as yet undetected human-to-human transmission outside mainland China.

Appendix data sources
Data on cases in international travellers: international_cases_2020_21_02.csv

Español - Spanish

21 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 6: Relative sensitivity of international surveillance

(Download Report 6)

Sangeeta Bhatia, Natsuko Imai, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Marc Baguelin, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Hayley Thompson, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Charlie Whittaker, Xiaoyue Xi, Christl A. Donnelly1, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: c.donnelly@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 6 - translation will be available shortly
Since the start of the COVID-19 epidemic in late 2019, there are now 29 affected countries with over 1000 confirmed cases outside of mainland China. In previous reports, we estimated the likely epidemic size in Wuhan City based on air traffic volumes and the number of detected cases internationally. Here we analysed COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China to different regions and countries, comparing the country-specific rates of detected and confirmed cases per flight volume to estimate the relative sensitivity of surveillance in different countries. Although travel restrictions from Wuhan City and other cities across China may have reduced the absolute number of travellers to and from China, we estimated that about two thirds of COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China have remained undetected worldwide, potentially resulting in multiple chains of as yet undetected human-to-human transmission outside mainland China.

Appendix data sources
Data on cases in international travellers: international_cases_2020_21_02.csv

Français - French

21 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 6: Relative sensitivity of international surveillance

(Download Report 6)

Sangeeta Bhatia, Natsuko Imai, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Marc Baguelin, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Hayley Thompson, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Charlie Whittaker, Xiaoyue Xi, Christl A. Donnelly1, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: c.donnelly@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 6 - translation will be available shortly
Since the start of the COVID-19 epidemic in late 2019, there are now 29 affected countries with over 1000 confirmed cases outside of mainland China. In previous reports, we estimated the likely epidemic size in Wuhan City based on air traffic volumes and the number of detected cases internationally. Here we analysed COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China to different regions and countries, comparing the country-specific rates of detected and confirmed cases per flight volume to estimate the relative sensitivity of surveillance in different countries. Although travel restrictions from Wuhan City and other cities across China may have reduced the absolute number of travellers to and from China, we estimated that about two thirds of COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China have remained undetected worldwide, potentially resulting in multiple chains of as yet undetected human-to-human transmission outside mainland China.

Appendix data sources
Data on cases in international travellers: international_cases_2020_21_02.csv

Arabic - العربية

21 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 6: Relative sensitivity of international surveillance

(Download Report 6)

Sangeeta Bhatia, Natsuko Imai, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Marc Baguelin, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Hayley Thompson, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Charlie Whittaker, Xiaoyue Xi, Christl A. Donnelly1, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: c.donnelly@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 6 - translation will be available shortly
Since the start of the COVID-19 epidemic in late 2019, there are now 29 affected countries with over 1000 confirmed cases outside of mainland China. In previous reports, we estimated the likely epidemic size in Wuhan City based on air traffic volumes and the number of detected cases internationally. Here we analysed COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China to different regions and countries, comparing the country-specific rates of detected and confirmed cases per flight volume to estimate the relative sensitivity of surveillance in different countries. Although travel restrictions from Wuhan City and other cities across China may have reduced the absolute number of travellers to and from China, we estimated that about two thirds of COVID-19 cases exported from mainland China have remained undetected worldwide, potentially resulting in multiple chains of as yet undetected human-to-human transmission outside mainland China.

Appendix data sources
Data on cases in international travellers: international_cases_2020_21_02.csv

All reports published on COVID-19

Reports in English

15 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 5: Phylogenetic analysis of SARS-CoV-2

(Download Report 5)

Erik Volz1, Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Christl A. Donnelly, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Natsuko Imai, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Xiaoyue Xi, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: e.volz@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 5
Genetic diversity of SARS-CoV-2 (formerly 2019-nCoV), the virus which causes COVID-19, provides information about epidemic origins and the rate of epidemic growth. By analysing 53 SARS-CoV-2 whole genome sequences collected up to February 3, 2020, we find a strong association between the time of sample collection and accumulation of genetic diversity. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic methods indicate that the virus was introduced into the human population in early December and has an epidemic doubling time of approximately seven days. Phylodynamic modelling provides an estimate of epidemic size through time. Precise estimates of epidemic size are not possible with current genetic data, but our analyses indicate evidence of substantial heterogeneity in the number of secondary infections caused by each case, as indicated by a high level of over-dispersion in the reproduction number. Larger numbers of more systematically sampled sequences – particularly from across China – will allow phylogenetic estimates of epidemic size and growth rate to be substantially refined. 

Appendix data sources
See supplementary file for GISAID IDs of sequences used for analyses: gisaid_id.csv

 


10 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 4: Severity of 2019-novel coronavirus (nCoV)

(Download Report 4)

Ilaria Dorigatti+, Lucy Okell+, Anne Cori, Natsuko Imai , Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe , Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Nan Hong , Min Kwun, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong (Raymond) Wang, Caroline Walters , Xiaoyue Xi, Christl Donnelly, Azra Ghani, Neil Ferguson*. With support from other volunteers from the MRC Centre.1

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

*Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk 1 See full list at end of document. +These two authors contributed equally.

Summary Report 4
We present case fatality ratio (CFR) estimates for three strata of COVID-19 (previously termed 2019-nCoV) infections. For cases detected in Hubei, we estimate the CFR to be 18% (95% credible interval: 11%-81%). For cases detected in travellers outside mainland China, we obtain central estimates of the CFR in the range 1.2-5.6% depending on the statistical methods, with substantial uncertainty around these central values. Using estimates of underlying infection prevalence in Wuhan at the end of January derived from testing of passengers on repatriation flights to Japan and Germany, we adjusted the estimates of CFR from either the early epidemic in Hubei Province, or from cases reported outside mainland China, to obtain estimates of the overall CFR in all infections (asymptomatic or symptomatic) of approximately 1% (95% confidence interval 0.5%-4%). It is important to note that the differences in these estimates does not reflect underlying differences in disease severity between countries. CFRs seen in individual countries will vary depending on the sensitivity of different surveillance systems to detect cases of differing levels of severity and the clinical care offered to severely ill cases. All CFR estimates should be viewed cautiously at the current time as the sensitivity of surveillance of both deaths and cases in mainland China is unclear. Furthermore, all estimates rely on limited data on the typical time intervals from symptom onset to death or recovery which influences the CFR estimates.

Appendix data sources
Data on early deaths from mainland China: hubei_early_deaths_2020_07_02.csv
Data on cases in international travellers: international_cases_2020_08_02.csv
 


25 January 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 3: Transmissibility of 2019-nCoV 

(Download Report 3)

Natsuko Imai, Anne Cori, Ilaria Dorigatti, Marc Baguelin, Christl A. Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling, MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics, Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

Note: This is an extended version of an analysis previously shared with WHO, governments and academic networks between 22/1/20-24/1/20.

Summary Report 3
Self-sustaining human-to-human transmission of the novel coronavirus COVID-19 (previously termed 2019-nCoV) is the only plausible explanation of the scale of the outbreak in Wuhan. We estimate that, on average, each case infected 2.6 (uncertainty range: 1.5-3.5) other people up to 18th January 2020, based on an analysis combining our past estimates of the size of the outbreak in Wuhan with computational modelling of potential epidemic trajectories. This implies that control measures need to block well over 60% of transmission to be effective in controlling the outbreak. It is likely, based on the experience of SARS and MERS-CoV, that the number of secondary cases caused by a case of COVID-19 is highly variable – with many cases causing no secondary infections, and a few causing many. Whether transmission is continuing at the same rate currently depends on the effectiveness of current control measures implemented in China and the extent to which the populations of affected areas have adopted risk-reducing behaviours. In the absence of antiviral drugs or vaccines, control relies upon the prompt detection and isolation of symptomatic cases. It is unclear at the current time whether this outbreak can be contained within China; uncertainties include the severity spectrum of the disease caused by this virus and whether cases with relatively mild symptoms are able to transmit the virus efficiently. Identification and testing of potential cases need to be as extensive as is permitted by healthcare and diagnostic testing capacity – including the identification, testing and isolation of suspected cases with only mild to moderate disease (e.g. influenza-like illness), when logistically feasible.


22 January 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 2: Estimating the potential total number of novel Coronavirus cases in Wuhan City, China 

(Download Report 2)

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Christl Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics, Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 2
On January 16th we released estimates of the scale of the COVID-19 (previously termed 2019-nCoV) outbreak in China based on an analysis of the number of cases detected outside mainland China. Since then, cumulative confirmed cases reported by the Chinese authorities have increased 10-fold, to 440 by January 22nd. The number of detected outside China with symptom onset by 18th January had increased to 7 in the same time. Here we report updated estimates of the scale of the epidemic in Wuhan, based on an analysis of flight and population data from that city. Our estimate of the number of cases in Wuhan with symptoms onset by January 18th is now 4,000. The  uncertainty range is 1,000-9,700, reflecting the many continuing unknowns involved in deriving these estimates. Our central estimate of 4,000 is more than double our past estimates, a result of the increase of the number of cases detected outside mainland China from 3 to 7. Our estimates should not be interpreted as implying the outbreak has suddenly doubled in size in the period 12th January to 18th January – delays in confirming and reporting exported cases and incomplete information about dates of symptom onset together with the still very small numbers of exported cases mean we are unable to estimate the epidemic growth rate at the current time.

Our analysis suggests that the COVID-19 outbreak has caused substantially more cases of moderate or severe respiratory illness in Wuhan than have currently been detected. However, recent rapid increases in officially reported confirmed case numbers in China suggest that case detection and reporting has been substantially enhanced in recent days. With further refinements and expansion of surveillance (for instance, to primary care providers) it is to be hoped that the differences between our estimates and official case numbers will lessen further. Given the increasing evidence for human-to-human transmission, enhancing rapid case detection will be essential if the outbreak is to be controlled.


17 January 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 1: Estimating the potential total number of novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) cases in Wuhan City, China 

(Download Report 1)

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics, Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 1
Many aspects of the COVID-19 (previously termed 2019-nCoV) outbreak are highly uncertain. However, the detection of three cases outside China (two in Thailand, one in Japan) is worrying. We calculate, based on flight and population data, that there is only a 1 in 574 chance that a person infected in Wuhan would travel overseas before they sought medical care. This implies there might have been over 1700 (3 x 574) cases in Wuhan so far. There are many unknowns, meaning the uncertainty range around this estimate goes from 190 cases to over 4000. But the magnitude of these numbers suggests that substantial human to human transmission cannot be ruled out. Heightened surveillance, prompt information sharing and enhanced preparedness are recommended.

Reports in 中文 - Mandarin

2020年2月15日  - Imperial College London‌

报告5SARS-CoV-2的系统发育分析

(Download Report 5)

Erik Volz1, Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Christl A. Donnelly, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Natsuko Imai, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Xiaoyue Xi, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: e.volz@imperial.ac.uk

报告摘要5
导致COVID-19的病毒SARS-CoV-2(先前命名为2019-nCoV)的遗传多样性提供了有关该流行起源和增长率的信息。通过分析截至202023日收集到的53SARS-CoV-2全基因组序列,我们发现样本收集时间与遗传多样性积累之间存在密切关联。贝叶斯和最大似然系统发育方法表明,该病毒于12月初被引入人类群体,其流行倍增时间约为7天。动态系统发育分析提供了流行规模随时间变化的估计。目前的基因数据尚无法准确估计流行规模,但我们的分析表明,每起病例引起的继发感染数量均存在极大差异,这是根据过度分散的繁殖数量得出的。大量的更加系统采样的序列(尤其是来自中国各地的序列)将使流行规模和增长率的系统发育估计更加精准。

附录数据源
用于分析序列的GISAID ID请参阅补充文件gisaid_id.csv

 


2020年2月10日 - Imperial College London‌

报告4:新型冠状病毒的疾病严重程度

(Download Report 4)

Ilaria Dorigatti+, Lucy Okell+, Anne Cori, Natsuko Imai , Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe , Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Nan Hong , Min Kwun, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong (Raymond) Wang, Caroline Walters , Xiaoyue Xi, Christl Donnelly, Azra Ghani, Neil Ferguson*. With support from other volunteers from the MRC Centre.1

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA)
Imperial College London

*Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk. 1报告文件末请见完整名单+这两名作者有相同贡献.

报告摘要4
本篇报告中,我们提供了三种类型的 COVID-19 (先前命名为2019-nCoV) 感染病例的病死率(CFR)估计值。对于在湖北发现的病例,我们估计病死率为18%(95%贝叶斯置信区间:11%-81%)。对于在中国大陆以外的旅行者中发现的病例,我们根据统计方法得出, 病死率估计值的中位数介于1.2-5.6%之间,而且这些中心估计值存在很大的不确定性。我们根据日本和德国撤侨航班上乘客的检测结果,估算出1月底武汉市的潜在感染盛行率,并据此调整湖北省早期病例或中国大陆以外病例的病死率的估算,从而估计所有感染病例(不论有无症状)的总病死率约为1%(95%信赖区间:0.5%-4%)。值得注意的是,这些估计值的差异并不反映国家之间疾病严重程度的根本差异。在各个国家/地区中的病死率会有所不同,取决于不同监测系统对疾病严重程度检测的敏感性以及为重症患者提供的临床护理。由于目前尚不清楚在中国大陆对死亡和病例所进行监测的敏感性,因此应谨慎看待所有病死率的估计值。此外,所有估计都依赖于一般个案从症状出现到死亡或复原的时间间隔,这些有限的数据会影响病死率的估计。

附录数据源
来自中国大陆的早期死亡数据:hubei_early_deaths_2020_07_02.csv
有关国际旅行者个案的数据:
international_cases_2020_08_02.csv

 


2020年1月25日 - Imperial College London‌

报告3: 2019-nCoV 的传播性

(Download Report 3)

Natsuko Imai, Anne Cori, Ilaria Dorigatti, Marc Baguelin, Christl A. Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling, MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

注意:此版本延伸自先前在2020年01月20日到 2020年01月24日期间与世界卫生组织,政府和学术网络共享的分析。

报告摘要3

报告摘要3
新型冠状病毒 COVID-19 (先前命名为2019-nCoV) 的人与人之间自我维持式传播是造成武汉爆发规模唯一合理的解释。结合我们先前对武汉市暴发规模的估计与计算模拟的疫情推测,估计到2020年1月18日,每个病例平均会感染2.6个人(不确定性范围:1.5-3.5)。这意味着控制措施需要阻止超过60%的传播才能有效控制疫情爆发。根据SARS和MERS-CoV的经验, 每个 COVID-19病例引起的二次传播人数也可能差异甚大─许多病例未感染他人,而少数病例引起大量传播。目前,传播是否继续以同样的速度进行,取决于中国目前实施的控制措施的有效性以及受影响地区的居民采取降低风险行为的程度。在没有抗病毒药物或疫苗的情况下,疫情控制依赖于对有症状病例的迅速发现和隔离。目前尚不清楚这次暴发是否可以在中国境内得到遏制。不确定因素包括由该病毒引起的疾病严重程度以及症状相对较轻的病例是否能够有效传播病毒。潜在病例的识别和检测需要在医疗保健系统和检测能力允许的范围内尽可能扩大,包括在实际可行的情况下,对仅轻度至中度疾病(例如流感样疾病)的疑似病例进行识别,检测和隔离。


2020年1月22日 - Imperial College London‌

报告2:估计中国武汉市新型冠状病毒病例的潜在总数 

(Download report 2 - MandarinDownload report 2 - Mandarin)

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Christl Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

报告摘要2
1月16日,我们根据在中国大陆以外发现的病例数的分析,发布了中国 COVID-19 (先前命名为2019-nCoV) 爆发规模的估计值。此后,截至1月22日,中国当局报告的累计确诊病例增加了10倍,达到440例。同时,截至1月18日出现症状的人数在中国境外已增加到7人。在此,我们根据航班和人口数据进行分析,更新了武汉市疫情规模的估计值。我们估计武汉至1月18日出现症状的病例数为4,000例, 该估计值的不确定性范围为1,000至9,700 例,这反映了估计过程中持续涉及许多未知因素。由于在中国大陆以外地区发现的病例数从3例增加到7例, 这次的估计值中位数4,000例,为上次报告的两倍以上。。我们的估计值不应被解释为在1月12日至1月18日期间爆发规模突然增加了一倍 ─ 延迟确认和通报境外病例,症状发作日期信息的不完整,以及输出病例的数量仍然很少,皆使我们当前仍无法估计的疫情增长率。

 我们的分析表明,COVID-19 爆发在武汉造成的中度或重度呼吸道疾病病例数大幅高于目前已发现的病例数。然而最近中国官方报告的确诊病例数迅速增加,显示近几天来病例的检测和通报有了大幅度的提升。随着监测愈加完善和扩展(例如,扩展至基层医疗院所),我们的估计值与官方病例数之间的差异有望进一步减少。鉴于人与人之间传播的证据越来越多,加强快速病例检测对于控制疫情爆发至关重要。


2020年1月17日 - Imperial College London‌

报告1:估计中国武汉市新型冠状病毒病例的潜在总数 

(Download Report 1)

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

报告摘要1
新型武汉冠状病毒爆发在许多方面都有高度的不确定性。 但是,在中国境外发现3例病例(泰国2例,日本1例)令人担忧。根据航班和人口数据,我们计算得出,在武汉被感染者中,只有五百七十四分之一的机会,患者会在就医之前出国旅行。这意味着到目前为止,武汉可能已经有超过1700(3 x 574)例。此次病毒爆发仍有许多未知因素,使估计值的不确定性范围从190例到超过4000例。但是这些数字的规模显示,不能排除大量人与人之间的传播。因此建议应提高监测,及时信息共享和加强疫情应变准备。

Reports in 日本語 - Japanese

15 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 5: Phylogenetic analysis of SARS-CoV-2

(Download Report 5)

Erik Volz1, Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Christl A. Donnelly, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Natsuko Imai, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Xiaoyue Xi, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: e.volz@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 5 - translation will be available shortly
Genetic diversity of SARS-CoV-2 (formerly 2019-nCoV), the virus which causes COVID-19, provides information about epidemic origins and the rate of epidemic growth. By analysing 53 SARS-CoV-2 whole genome sequences collected up to February 3, 2020, we find a strong association between the time of sample collection and accumulation of genetic diversity. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic methods indicate that the virus was introduced into the human population in early December and has an epidemic doubling time of approximately seven days. Phylodynamic modelling provides an estimate of epidemic size through time. Precise estimates of epidemic size are not possible with current genetic data, but our analyses indicate evidence of substantial heterogeneity in the number of secondary infections caused by each case, as indicated by a high level of over-dispersion in the reproduction number. Larger numbers of more systematically sampled sequences – particularly from across China – will allow phylogenetic estimates of epidemic size and growth rate to be substantially refined. 

Appendix data sources
See supplementary file for GISAID IDs of sequences used for analyses: gisaid_id.csv

 


2020210 - Imperial College London​

レポート4新型コロナウイルス(2019-nCoV)の重症度

(Download Report 4)

Ilaria Dorigatti+, Lucy Okell+, Anne Cori, Natsuko Imai , Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe , Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Nan Hong , Min Kwun, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong (Raymond) Wang, Caroline Walters , Xiaoyue Xi, Christl Donnelly, Azra Ghani, Neil Ferguson*. With support from other volunteers from the MRC Centre.1

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk 1本書末にあるリストを参照のこと。+この2名の著者は等しく貢献しました。

レポート4概要
新型コロナウイルス(2019-nCoV)感染症の3つの異なる死亡率(CFR)推定値をお知らせします。湖北省で検出された症例については、CFR推定値は18%(95%確信区間:11%81%)です。中国本土以外で検出された旅行者の症例については、統計方法に応じてCFRの推定の中央値は1.25.6%の範囲で、非常に不確かな数値を示しています。日本とドイツへの帰還便の乗客の検査から得られた、1月末の武漢での原因となる感染有病率の推定値を使用して、湖北省での初期の流行、または中国本土以外での報告症例のいずれかからのCFR推定値を調整すると、すべての感染者(無症候性または症候性)における全体的なCFR推定値は約1%(95%信頼区間0.5%~4%)となります。この推定値における差異は、各国の感染症の重症度の原因となる違いを反映していないことを指摘する必要があります。各国で見られるCFRは、異なるレベルの重症患者を検出する様々な監視システムの感度と、重症患者に提供される臨床ケアによって異なります。中国本土での死亡者と患者の両方を監視するシステムの感度が不確かであるため、現時点では、すべてのCFR推定値を慎重に判断する必要があります。また、すべての推定値は、CFR推定値に影響を与える症状の発現から死亡または回復までの典型的な時間区間における限定的なデータに基づくものです。

付録のデータ源
中国本土からの早期死亡に関するデータ:hubei_early_deaths_2020_07_02.csv
海外の旅行者の症例に関するデータ:international_cases_2020_08_02.csv


2020年1月25日 - Imperial College London‌

レポート3:新型コロナウイルス(2019-nCoV)の感染率 

(Download Report 3)‌‌

Natsuko Imai, Anne Cori, Ilaria Dorigatti, Marc Baguelin, Christl A. Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling, MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

注:これは、2020/1/22~2020/1/24の間にWHO、各国政府、学術ネットワークで共有された分析の更新版です。

レポート3 概要
武漢で新型コロナウイルス COVID-19 (旧名: 2019-nCoV) が大規模に拡散している唯一の納得できる理由は、これがヒトからヒトへの持続性感染であることです。2020年1月18日までに、各患者から平均2.6(不確実性範囲:1.5~3.5)人に感染したと推定できます 。これは、武漢でのアウトブレイクの規模に対する私たちの過去の推定値と、起こりうるエピデミックの軌跡計算モデリングを組み合わせた分析に基づいたものです。つまり発生を効果的に抑制するためには、制御措置により感染の60%超を抑制することが必要です。重症急性呼吸器感染症(SARS)と中東呼吸器感染症(MERS)の経験に基づくと、新型コロナウイルス患者からの二次感染による患者数は非常に可変的である可能性が高く、大多数の患者は二次感染を引き起こしませんが、少数の患者が一人で多くの二次感染を起こす場合があります。現在、伝染が同じ割合で継続しているかどうかは、中国で実施されている現在の制御措置の効果と、影響を受けている地域の人々がリスク低減行動をどの程度実行しているかにより異なります。抗ウイルス薬やワクチンがない場合、制御措置は症状を提示した患者を迅速に検出して隔離することですが、現時点ではこの流行が中国国内に収まるかどうか不明です。このウイルスによって引き起こされる疾患の重症度、比較的軽度の患者でもウイルスを簡単に伝播できる可能性についても不明です。潜在的患者の同定や検査は、医療機関および診断検査施設で許可される範囲で行う必要があり、ロジスティックに実行可能な場合、軽度から中程度の疾患(インフルエンザ様疾患など)のみが疑われる患者の同定、検査、隔離も上記の範囲内で行う必要があります。


2020年1月22日 - Imperial College London‌

レポート2:中国武漢市における新型コロナウイルス(2019-nCoV)患者の潜在的総数の推定

(Download Report 2)‌‌

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Christl Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

レポート2概要
我々インペリアルカレッジMRC国際感染症分析センターは、1月16日中国における新型コロナウイルスのアウトブレイクスケールを発表しました。これは中国本土以外で発見された感染ケース数をベースにした分析でしたが、1月22日現在、中国当局が確認したケースは10倍の440に増加しています同時に、海外で発見された1/18までに発症した感染者数は7人になりました。

以上のデータに加えて武漢市の人口とフライトデータの分析を基に、我々は武漢でのアウトブレイクスケールをアップデートしました。我々の新たな推測では1/18までに発症した武漢市内の推定患者数は4000人です。信頼区間(統計学用語ー推測域のこと)は1000ー9700人で、これはまだはっきりしていない現在進行形のケースがたくさんあるためです。推定の中心の4000人という数字は前回の推定の倍ですが、これは海外での感染者数が3人から7人に増加した結果であって、1/12から1/18の短期間で感染のスケールが倍になったという訳ではありません。海外の感染者の確認と報告の遅れ、発症の日付け等の情報が曖昧なこと、さらに加えて海外感染者数が未だ少ないことなどから、現時点で伝染のGrowth Rateを推測することは非常に難しくなっています。

我々の分析では、武漢での中程度から重篤な呼吸器疾患の患者数は、現時点で報告されているより実際にはもっと多いということになります。しかしながら、中国で正式に確認された患者数が急速に増加していることから、感染ケースの検出と報告の精度が高まっていると考えられ、これらのさらなる改善とサベイランスの拡張 (例えば初診でのしっかりした診断) で、我々の推定数と正式なケースナンバーはさらに近づいていくだろうと思われます。いずれにせよ、人から人への感染が確認された以上、流行をコントロールするためには、迅速なケースの検出が極めて重要です。


2020年1月17日 - Imperial College London‌

レポート1:中国武漢市における新型コロナウイルス(2019-nCoV)患者の潜在的総数の推定

(Download Report 1)

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (JIDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

レポート1概要
今回の武漢での新型コロナウイルスの発生では、多くの点がまだ非常に不明な状態です。しかし中国国外で3名(タイで2名、日本で1名)の患者が検出されたことは注意を要します。渡航記録と人口データに基づいた私たちの計算では、武漢で感染した人が医療手当を受けずに海外に旅行する可能性はわずか574分の1です。つまりこれは、武漢で1700(3 x 574)名を超える感染者がいる可能性があることを意味します。しかし、これには多数の未知数があり、この推定値の不確実性範囲は、190名から4000名超になります。この数字の大きさは実質的にヒトからヒトへの感染が否定できないことを示しています。監視の強化、迅速な情報共有、準備体制の強化が推奨されます。

Reports in Español - Spanish

15 de febrero de 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Reporte 5: Análisis filogenético del SARS-CoV-2

(Download Report 5)

Erik Volz1, Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Christl A. Donnelly, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Natsuko Imai, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Xiaoyue Xi, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: e.volz@imperial.ac.uk

Resumen del Reporte 5
La diversidad genética del SARS-CoV-2 (anteriormente 2019-nCoV), el virus que causa COVID-19, proporciona información sobre los orígenes de la epidemia y la tasa de crecimiento de la epidemia. Al analizar 53 secuencias del genoma completo del SARS-CoV-2 recolectadas hasta el 3 de febrero de 2020, encontramos una asociación fuerte entre el momento de la recolección de la muestra y la acumulación de diversidad genética. Los métodos filogenéticos bayesianos y de máxima probabilidad indican que el virus se introdujo en la población humana a principios de diciembre y tiene un tiempo de duplicación epidémico de aproximadamente siete días. El modelado filo-dinámico proporciona una estimación del tamaño de la epidemia a lo largo del tiempo. Las estimaciones precisas del tamaño de la epidemia no son posibles con los datos genéticos actuales, pero nuestros análisis indican evidencia de heterogeneidad sustancial en el número de infecciones secundarias causadas por cada caso, como lo indica un alto nivel de sobre-dispersión en el número reproductivo, R. Un mayor número de secuencias sistemáticamente muestreadas, particularmente de más lugares en China, permitirá que las estimaciones filogenéticas del tamaño de la epidemia y la tasa de crecimiento se refinen sustancialmente.

Apéndice fuente de datos
Ver archivo suplementario con los identificadores de las secuencias utilizadas para los análisis: gisaid_id.csv

 


10 de febrero de 2020 - Imperial College London

Reporte 4: Severidad del nuevo 2019-novel coronavirus (nCoV)

(Download Report 4)

Ilaria Dorigatti+, Lucy Okell+, Anne Cori, Natsuko Imai , Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe , Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Nan Hong , Min Kwun, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong (Raymond) Wang, Caroline Walters , Xiaoyue Xi, Christl Donnelly, Azra Ghani, Neil Ferguson*. With support from other volunteers from the MRC Centre.1

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA)
Imperial College London

*Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk 1 Ver lista completa al final del documento. +Estos dos autores contribuyeron igualmente.

Resumen del reporte 4
Presentamos las estimaciones de letalidad entre casos sintomáticos, CFR por su nombre en inglés (Case Fatality Ratio), para tres estratos de infecciones por COVID-19 (anteriormente denominado 2019-nCoV). Para casos detectados en Hubei, China, estimamos que CFR está en 18% (intervalo bayesiano de credibilidad del 95%: 11-81%). Para casos detectados en viajeros fuera de China continental, obtenemos estimación central de CFR entre 1.2-5.6% dependiendo de los métodos estadísticos usados, con una incertidumbre sustancial alrededor de estos valores centrales.  Utilizando estimaciones de la prevalencia de infección subyacente en Wuhan a fines de enero, derivadas de las pruebas de pasajeros en vuelos de repatriación a Japón y Alemania, ajustamos las estimaciones de CFR a partir de la epidemia temprana en la provincia de Hubei, o a partir de casos reportados fuera de China continental, para obtener estimaciones del CFR general en todas las infecciones (asintomáticas o sintomáticas) de aproximadamente el 1% (intervalo bayesiano de credibilidad del 95%: 0.5%-4%). Es importante notar que las diferencias de estos estimativos no reflejan diferencias subyacentes en la severidad de la enfermedad entre países. Los CFRs observados en individuos y países variarán dependiendo de la sensibilidad de los diferentes sistemas de vigilancia para detectar los diferentes niveles de severidad y del tipo de cuidado clínico ofrecido a los casos gravemente enfermos. Todos los estimativos de CFR deberían verse con cautela en este momento dado que la sensibilidad de la vigilancia tanto de casos como de muertes en China continental aun no está clara. Además, todas las estimaciones se basan en datos limitados sobre los intervalos de tiempo típicos desde el inicio de los síntomas hasta la muerte o la recuperación, lo que influye en las estimaciones de CFR.

Apéndice fuente de datos
Datos tempranos de muerte en China: hubei_early_deaths_2020_07_02.csv
Datos de casos en viajeros internacionales: international_cases_2020_08_02.csv

 


25 de enero de 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Reporte 3: Transmisibilidad de 2019-nCoV

(Download Report 3)

Natsuko Imai, Anne Cori, Ilaria Dorigatti, Marc Baguelin, Christl A. Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling, MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

Nota: Esta es una versión extendida de un análisis previamente compartido con la OMS, algunos gobiernos y redes académicas entre  22/01/20 y 24/01/20.

Resumen del Reporte 3
La transmisión del nuevo coronavirus COVID-19 (anteriormente denominado 2019-nCoV) humano-humano y auto sostenida es la única explicación plausible de la escala del brote en Wuhan. Nosotros estimamos que, en promedio, cada caso infectó 2.6 personas (incertidumbre 1.5 – 3.5) hasta el 18 de enero 2020, con base en un análisis combinando nuestras estimaciones previas del tamaño del brote y modelamiento computacional de trayectorias epidémicas potenciales. Esto implica que las medidas de control necesitan bloquear por encima de 60% de la transmisión para que sean efectivas en controlar el brote. Es probable, basados en la experiencia previa con SARS-CoV y MERS-CoV, que el número de casos secundarios causados por un caso de COVID-19 sea altamente variable – con múltiples casos no causando transmisión y unos pocos causando mucha. Que la transmisión continúe a la misma velocidad actualmente depende de la efectividad de las medidas de control actuales implementadas en China y del grado en que las poblaciones de las áreas afectadas hayan adoptado comportamientos de reducción de riesgos. En ausencia de medicamentos antivirales o vacunas, el control se basa en la detección rápida y el aislamiento de casos sintomáticos. No está claro en este momento si este brote puede ser contenido dentro de China; incertidumbres incluyen el espectro de gravedad de la enfermedad causada por este virus y si los casos con síntomas relativamente leves pueden transmitir el virus de manera eficiente. La identificación y diagnóstico de casos potenciales deben ser tan extensa como lo permita la capacidad de pruebas de diagnóstico y atención médica - incluida la identificación, prueba y aislamiento de casos sospechosos con enfermedad leve a moderada (por ejemplo, enfermedad similar a la influenza), cuando sea logísticamente factible.



22 de enero de 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Reporte 2: Estimación del potencial número de caos del nuevo Coronavirus en la ciudad de Wuhan, China  

(Download Report 2)

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Christl Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

Resumen del Reporte 2
El 16 de enero publicamos estimativos de la magnitud actual del brote de COVID-19 (anteriormente denominado 2019-nCoV) en China con base en un análisis del número de casos detectados fuera de China continental. Desde entonces, el número de casos acumulados confirmados y reportados por las autoridades chinas ha incrementado 10 veces y ahora alcanzan 440 hasta el 22 de enero. El número de casos detectado fuera de China con fecha de inicio de síntomas hasta el 18 de enero ha incrementado a 7 en el mismo periodo. Aquí, nosotros reportamos los estimativos de la magnitud de la epidemia en Wuhan, con base en un análisis de vuelos y datos poblacionales de la ciudad. Nuestro estimado del número de casos en Wuhan con fecha de inicio de síntomas hasta el 18 de enero es ahora 4000. El rango de incertidumbre es de 1000 a 9700 reflejando así las incógnitas persistentes derivadas de estas estimaciones. Nuestra estimación central es 4000 lo cual es más del doble de las estimaciones del reporte anterior, como resultado del incremento en el número de casos detectados fuera de China continental de 3 a 7. Nuestros estimativos no deben ser interpretados simplemente como una duplicación del tamaño del brote en el periodo del 12 al 18 de enero. Los retrasos en la confirmación y reporte de casos exportados y la información incompleta acerca de las fechas de inicio de síntomas junto con el aún pequeño número de casos exportados hace que nosotros no podamos estimar la tasa de crecimiento del brote en este momento.

Nuestros análisis sugieren que el brote COVID-19 ha causado un mayor número de casos de infección respiratoria moderada o grave en Wuhan que lo que actualmente se ha detectado. Sin embargo, el reciente rápido incremento en el número de casos reportados confirmados en China sugiere que la detección de casos y el reporte han mejorado sustancialmente en los días recientes. Con un mayor refinamiento y expansión de la vigilancia (por ejemplo, hacia proveedores de cuidado primario) se espera que las diferencias entre nuestros estimativos y el número oficial de casos se minimicen aún más. Dado el incremento de la evidencia de transmisión humano-humano, mejorar la detección rápida será esencial si se tiene el objetivo de controlar el brote.


17 de enero de 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Reporte 1: Estimación del potencial número de caos del nuevo Coronavirus en la ciudad de Wuhan, China 

(Download Report 1)

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

Resumen del Reporte 1
Muchos aspectos del nuevo brote de coronavirus COVID-19 (anteriormente denominado 2019-nCoV) en Wuhan son altamente inciertos. Sin embargo, la detección de tres casos por fuera de China (dos en Tailandia, uno en Japón) es preocupante. Nosotros calculamos, con base en datos de vuelos y poblacionales es que hay solo un chance de 1 en 574 de que una persona infectada en Wuhan viaje internacionalmente antes de buscar cuidado médico.  Esto implica que debe haber cerca de 1700 (3 x 574) casos en Wuhan hasta la fecha. Hay muchas incógnitas, lo cual significa que el rango de incertidumbre alrededor de estos estimativos va desde 190 hasta más de 4000. Pero, la magnitud de estos números sugiere que una substancial transmisión de humano a humano no puede ser descartada. Se recomienda un incremento en la vigilancia, intercambio rápido de información y un fortalecimiento de los planes de preparación.

Reports in Français - French

15 February 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Report 5: Phylogenetic analysis of SARS-CoV-2

(Download Report 5)

Erik Volz1, Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Christl A. Donnelly, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Natsuko Imai, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Xiaoyue Xi, Neil M. Ferguson

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics
Imperial College London

1Correspondence: e.volz@imperial.ac.uk

Summary Report 5 translation will be available shortly
Genetic diversity of SARS-CoV-2 (formerly 2019-nCoV), the virus which causes COVID-19, provides information about epidemic origins and the rate of epidemic growth. By analysing 53 SARS-CoV-2 whole genome sequences collected up to February 3, 2020, we find a strong association between the time of sample collection and accumulation of genetic diversity. Bayesian and maximum likelihood phylogenetic methods indicate that the virus was introduced into the human population in early December and has an epidemic doubling time of approximately seven days. Phylodynamic modelling provides an estimate of epidemic size through time. Precise estimates of epidemic size are not possible with current genetic data, but our analyses indicate evidence of substantial heterogeneity in the number of secondary infections caused by each case, as indicated by a high level of over-dispersion in the reproduction number. Larger numbers of more systematically sampled sequences – particularly from across China – will allow phylogenetic estimates of epidemic size and growth rate to be substantially refined. 

Appendix data sources
See supplementary file for GISAID IDs of sequences used for analyses: gisaid_id.csv

 


10 février 2020 – Imperial College London

Rapport 4 : Gravité du nouveau coronavirus 2019 (nCoV)

(Download Report 4)‌‌

Ilaria Dorigatti+, Lucy Okell+, Anne Cori, Natsuko Imai , Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe , Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Nan Hong , Min Kwun, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong (Raymond) Wang, Caroline Walters , Xiaoyue Xi, Christl Donnelly, Azra Ghani, Neil Ferguson*. With support from other volunteers from the MRC Centre.1

WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis
Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA)
Imperial College London

*Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk 1 Voir la liste complète à la fin du document. +Ces deux auteurs ont contribué de manière égale.

Résumé de rapport 4
Voici nos estimations du taux de létalité pour trois phases d’infection au 2019-nCoV. Pour les cas détectés dans la province du Hubei, nous estimons le taux de létalité à 18 % (intervalle de crédibilité de 95 % : 11 %-81 %). Concernant les cas détectés chez les voyageurs en dehors de la Chine continentale, nous obtenons des estimations centrales du taux de létalité de l'ordre de 1,2 à 5,6 %, en fonction des méthodes statistiques, avec une incertitude importante eu égard à ces valeurs. À l’aide des estimations de la prévalence sous-jacente de l’infection à Wuhan fin janvier, dérivées des tests effectués sur les passagers des vols de rapatriement vers le Japon et l’Allemagne, nous avons ajusté les estimations du taux de létalité à partir des données issues de l’épidémie initiale dans la province du Hubei ou des cas signalés hors de la Chine continentale, afin d'obtenir des estimations du taux de létalité global pour tous les cas d’infections (asymptomatiques ou symptomatiques) à hauteur de 1 % environ (0,5 % à 4 % pour un intervalle de confiance de 95 %). Il convient également de noter que les écarts entre ces estimations ne reflètent pas les différences sous-jacentes de la gravité de la maladie entre les pays. Les taux de létalité constatés dans chaque pays varient en fonction de la sensibilité des différents systèmes de surveillance, visant à détecter des cas d’infections à des niveaux de gravité différents, et en fonction des soins cliniques offerts aux patients gravement malades. À l’heure actuelle, il convient d’interpréter toutes les estimations du taux de létalité avec prudence, dans la mesure où la sensibilité du système de surveillance des décès et des infections en Chine continentale n’est pas claire. Par ailleurs, toutes ces estimations reposent sur des données limitées relatives aux délais classiques entre l’apparition des symptômes et le décès ou le rétablissement, lesdites données ayant une influence sur les estimations du taux de létalité.

Annexe : sources des données
Données sur les premiers décès en Chine continentale: hubei_early_deaths_2020_07_02.csvDonnées sur les cas d’infections chez les voyageurs internationaux: international_cases_2020_08_02.csv


25 janvier 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Rapport 3 : Transmissibilité du 2019-nCoV 

(Download Report 3)‌‌

Natsuko Imai, Anne Cori, Ilaria Dorigatti, Marc Baguelin, Christl A. Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling, MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

Remarque : il s'agit d'une version approfondie d’une analyse déjà communiquée à l’OMS, aux gouvernements et aux réseaux universitaires entre le 22/01/2020 et le 24/01/2020.

Rapport de synthèse 3
La transmission auto-entretenue entre humains du nouveau coronavirus COVID-19 (précedemment dénommé 2019-nCoV) est la seule explication plausible à l’ampleur de l’épidémie à Wuhan. Selon les estimations, chaque personne infectée a transmis le virus à 2,6 individus (marge d’incertitude de 1,5-3,5) jusqu’au 18 janvier 2020, sur la base d’une analyse combinant nos estimations antérieures sur l'ampleur de l’épidémie à Wuhan à une modélisation informatique de ses éventuelles trajectoires. Cela signifie que les mesures de contrôle doivent bloquer bien plus de 60 % des transmissions pour pouvoir efficacement contenir l’épidémie. Compte tenu des enseignements tirés des épidémies du SARS et du MERS-CoV, le nombre de cas secondaires causés par une infection au COVID-19 est probablement très variable, beaucoup des cas n’entraînant aucune infection secondaire, et peu de cas en entraînant beaucoup. Le fait que l’épidémie continue ou non à se propager au même rythme dépend, à l'heure actuelle, de l’efficacité des mesures de contrôle en cours mises en œuvre en Chine et de la mesure selon laquelle les comportements permettant de réduire les risques ont été adoptés par les populations dans les zones touchées. En l’absence de vaccins ou d’antiviraux, le contrôle repose sur un dépistage précoce et sur la mise à l'isolement des cas symptomatiques. Actuellement, nous ne savons pas si cette épidémie peut être contenue en Chine. Le spectre de gravité de la maladie causée par ce virus et le potentiel de transmission des cas présentant des symptômes relativement bénins font notamment l’objet d’incertitudes. L’identification et le dépistage des cas éventuels doivent être aussi étendus que possible en fonction du système de santé et des capacités de dépistage diagnostique, ce qui comprend, lorsque les conditions logistiques le permettent, l’identification, le dépistage et la mise à l'isolement des cas suspects présentant des symptômes bénins à modérés (syndrome grippal, par exemple).


22 janvier 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Rapport 2 : Estimation du nombre total de cas potentiels du nouveau coronavirus à Wuhan, Chine 

(Download Report 2)‌‌

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Christl Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

Rapport de synthèse 2
Le 16 janvier, nous avons publié des estimations relatives à l’ampleur de l’épidémie de COVID-19 (précedemment dénommé 2019-nCoV) en Chine, sur la base d’une analyse du nombre de cas détectés en dehors de la Chine continentale. Depuis cette date, le nombre de cas cumulatifs d’infection, communiqué par les autorités chinoises, a été multiplié par 10, passant à 440 au 22 janvier. Dans le même temps, le nombre de cas caractérisés par l’apparition de symptômes, détectés hors de Chine au 18 janvier, était passé à 7.  Nous présentons ici les estimations à jour de l’ampleur de l’épidémie à Wuhan, selon une analyse relative aux vols et à la population en provenance de cette ville. Notre estimation du nombre de cas à Wuhan avec apparition de symptômes au 18 janvier est désormais passée à 4 000. La marge d’incertitude est de 1 000-9 700, démontrant qu’il demeure encore un grand nombre de variables inconnues à prendre en compte lors du calcul de ces estimations. Notre estimation centrale à hauteur de 4 000 correspond à plus de deux fois nos estimations antérieures et résulte de l’augmentation de 3 à 7 cas détectés en dehors de la Chine continentale. Cependant, ces estimations ne devraient pas être interprétées comme laissant supposer que le nombre de cas a soudainement doublé entre le 12 et le 18 janvier ; compte tenu des retards dans la confirmation et la communication des cas hors de Chine, des informations incomplètes sur les dates d’apparition des symptômes, ainsi que du nombre encore très limité de cas de contamination hors de Chine, nous ne sommes pas en mesure, à l’heure actuelle, d’estimer le rythme de propagation de l’épidémie.

Notre analyse suggère que l’épidémie de COVID-19 a entraîné un nombre nettement plus important de cas présentant des symptômes respiratoires modérés à sévères à Wuhan, par rapport au nombre de cas dépistés actuellement. Toutefois, les récentes augmentations rapides du nombre de cas confirmés et officiellement rapportés en Chine indiquent que le dépistage et le signalement des cas se sont considérablement améliorés ces derniers jours. Grâce aux nouveaux ajustements et à l’élargissement de la surveillance (par exemple, auprès des prestataires de soins de santé primaires), nous pouvons espérer une diminution des écarts entre nos estimations et le nombre de cas officiellement reconnus. La transmission entre humains faisant de moins en moins de doute, il sera essentiel d’améliorer le dépistage rapide afin de contenir l’épidémie.


17 janvier 2020 - Imperial College London‌

Rapport 1: Estimation du nombre total de cas potentiels du nouveau coronavirus (2019-nCoV) à Wuhan, Chine 

(Download Report 1)

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson
WHO Collaborating Centre for Infectious Disease Modelling
MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis, Abdul Latif Jameel Institute for Disease and Emergency Analytics (J-IDEA), Imperial College London, UK

Correspondence: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

Rapport de synthèse 1
Il demeure de nombreuses incertitudes concernant un grand nombre des aspects de l’épidémie du nouveau coronavirus COVID-19 (précedemment dénommé 2019-nCoV) en provenance de Wuhan. Toutefois, la détection de trois cas hors de Chine (deux en Thaïlande et un au Japon) est préoccupante. Selon nos calculs, sur la base des données relatives aux vols et à la population, il n’existe qu’un risque sur 574 qu’une personne infectée à Wuhan puisse se rendre à l’étranger avant de bénéficier de soins médicaux. Cela sous-entend qu’il y aurait eu, à ce jour, plus de 1 700 (3 x 574) cas à Wuhan. De nombreuses inconnues demeurent, ce qui signifie que la marge d’incertitude dans le cadre de cette estimation est de 190 à plus de 4 000 cas. L’ampleur de ces chiffres suggère qu’il n’est pas possible d’exclure la possibilité d’une transmission significative entre humains. Nous recommandons par conséquent de renforcer la surveillance, de partager rapidement les informations et d’améliorer l’état de préparation.

Reports in Arabic - العربية

15 فبراير 2020 – كلية لندن الإمبراطورية

 

التقرير 5: تحليل التطور النوعي لمتلازمة الالتهاب الرئوي الحاد الناجم عن النسخة الجديدة من فيروس كورونا

(Download Report 5)

Erik Volz1, Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Anne Cori, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Christl A. Donnelly, Ilaria Dorigatti, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe, Azra Ghani, Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Natsuko Imai, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Lucy Okell, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong Wang, Xiaoyue Xi, Neil M. Ferguson

منظمة الصحة العالمية المركز المتعاون لنمذجة الأمراض المعدية
مركز مجلس البحوث الطبية لتحليل الأمراض المعدية
معھد عبد اللطیف جمیل لمكافحة الأمراض المزمنة والأوبئة والأزمات الطارئة
جامعة إمبيريال كوليدج لندن، المملكة المتحدة

لتواصل:e.volz@imperial.ac.uk

ملخص التقرير 5

يؤكد التنوع الجيني لمتلازمة الالتهاب الرئوي الحاد الناجم عن النسخة الجديدة من فيروس كورونا (والذي عرف سابقا باسم فيروس كورونا المستجد 2019) – وهو الفيروس المتسبب في الأمراض الناجمة عن فيروس كورونا الجديد 2019 – على وجود سلالات وبائية منه، كما يدلنا على معدل نمو الوباء وانتشاره. ومن خلال التحليلات التي أجريت على 53 عينة تتابع جيني كامل لمتلازمة الالتهاب الرئوي الحاد الناجم عن النسخة الجديدة من فيروس كورونا، والتي جمعت حتى 3 فبراير 2020، وجدنا أن هناك ترابط قوي بين وقت أخذ العينة وتراكم التنوع الجيني. وفي هذا الصدد، أكدت طريقة بايزي للاستدلال ومنهجية التطور النوعي الأكثر ترجيحا أن الفيروس قد أصاب البشر في مطلع شهر ديسمبر وأن الفترة الزمنية اللازمة لتضاعفه حتى تحول إلى وباء قد بلغت 7 أيام تقريبا. ويقدم صوغ مسببات الأمراض تقديرا بحجم الوباء بمرور الوقت، بيد أن التقديرات الدقيقة غير متاحة الآن في ظل وجود البيانات الجينية الحالية. ومع ذلك، تشير تحليلاتنا إلى وجود دليل على التباين الكبير في أعداد العدوى الثانوية التي تسببها كل حالة، وهو ما يؤكده المستوى المرتفع للانتشار المتزايد في عدد التكاثر. وستتيح الأعداد الضخمة من تتابعات العينات الممنهج – ولا سيما من أرجاء الصين – للعلماء أن يحددوا بدقة التقديرات المتعلقة بالتطور النوعي لحجم الوباء ومعدل نموه.

ملحق مصادر المعلومات
انظر الملف التكميلي للمبادرة العالمية لمشاركة كافة المعلومات حول الإنفلونزا gisaid_id.csvIDs المستخدمة في تحليلات:


10 فبراير 2020 - جامعة إمبيريال كوليدجبلندن

تقرير 4: معدلات تفشي  فيروس كورونا الجديد 2019

(Download Report 4)‌‌

Ilaria Dorigatti+, Lucy Okell, Anne Cori, Natsuko Imai , Marc Baguelin, Sangeeta Bhatia, Adhiratha Boonyasiri, Zulma Cucunubá, Gina Cuomo-Dannenburg, Rich FitzJohn, Han Fu, Katy Gaythorpe , Arran Hamlet, Wes Hinsley, Nan Hong , Min Kwun, Daniel Laydon, Gemma Nedjati-Gilani, Steven Riley, Sabine van Elsland, Erik Volz, Haowei Wang, Yuanrong (Raymond) Wang, Caroline Walters , Xiaoyue Xi, Christl Donnelly, Azra Ghani, Neil Ferguson*. With support from other volunteers from the MRC Centre.

منظمة الصحة العالمية المركز المتعاون لنمذجة الأمراض المعدية
مركز مجلس البحوث الطبية لتحليل الأمراض المعدية
معھد عبد اللطیف جمیل لمكافحة الأمراض المزمنة والأوبئة والأزمات الطارئة
جامعة إمبيريال كوليدج لندن، المملكة المتحدة

 لتواصل: neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

تقرير موجز 4
نعرض لكم فيما يلي تقديرات لنسبة الوفيات الناجمة عن فيروس كورونا  الجديد 2019 على  ثلاث مستويات. بالنسبة للحالات المكتشفة في إقليم هوبى، تُقدر نسبة الوفيات الناجمة عن الفيروس بحوالي 18٪ (محسوبة بمستوى ثقة قدره 95%: 11٪ إلى 81٪). وبالنسبة للحالات التي تم اكتشافها ضمن المسافرين خارج البر الصيني الرئيسي، حصلنا على تقديرات مركزية لنسبة الوفيات الناجمة عن الفيروس في حدود 1.2-5.6٪ اعتمادًا على الطرق الإحصائية، مع وجود حالة عدم يقين كبيرة حول هذه القيم المركزية. باستخدام تقديرات انتشار العدوى في إقليم ووهان في نهاية يناير، والمستمدة من فحوصات المسافرين على رحلات العودة إلى اليابان وألمانيا، قمنا بتعديل تقديرات نسبة حالات الوفاة الناجمة عن الفيروس، سواء التي تعزى إلى الوباء المبكر في مقاطعة هوبى، أو من الحالات المبلغ عنها خارج البر الصيني الرئيسي، وحصلنا بالتالي على تقدير إجمالي لنسبة حالات الوفاة الناجمة عن الفيروس في جميع الإصابات (بأعراض أو بدون أعراض) يصل إلى حوالي 1٪ (محسوبة بمستوى ثقة قدره 95%: 0.5٪ -4٪). ومن المهم الإشارة إلى أن الاختلافات في هذه التقديرات لا تعكس الاختلافات الأساسية في مدى تفشي المرض بين البلدان. تختلف نسب حالات الوفاة المعلن عنها في كل دولة على حسب حساسية أنظمة المراقبة المختلفة المستخدمة في الكشف عن حالات بمستويات مختلفة من الشدة، والرعاية السريرية المقدمة للحالات شديدة الخطورة. يجب النظر إلى جميع تقديرات نسب حالات الوفاة بحذر في الوقت الحالي نظرًا لعدم وضوح مدى حساسية أنظمة مراقبة الوفيات وحالات الإصابة في البر الصيني الرئيسي. علاوة على ذلك، تعتمد جميع التقديرات على بيانات محدودة تتعلق بالفترات الزمنية المعتادة من بداية ظهور الأعراض إلى الوفاة أو التعافي، مما يؤثر بالتالي على تقديرات نسب الوفيات الناجمة عن المرض.

مصادر بيانات الملحق
بيانات عن الوفيات المبكرة من بر الصين الرئيسي:hubei_early_deaths_2020_07_02.csv
بيانات عن حالات الإصابة بالفيروس بين المسافرين الدوليين:international_cases_2020_08_02.csv


25 يناير2020 - جامعة إمبيريال كوليدجبلندن

Transmissiblity of 2019-nCoV :تقرير3

(Download Report 3)‌‌

Natsuko Imai, Anne Cori, Ilaria Dorigatti, Marc Baguelin, Christl A. Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson

منظمة الصحة العالمية المركز المتعاون لنمذجة الأمراض المعدية
مركز مجلس البحوث الطبية لتحليل الأمراض المعدية
معھد عبد اللطیف جمیل لمكافحة الأمراض المزمنة والأوبئة والأزمات الطارئة
جامعة إمبيريال كوليدج لندن، المملكة المتحدة

لتواصل:neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

ملاحظة: هذه نسخة محدثة من تحليل سبق أن تمت مشاركته مع منظمة الصحة العالمية والحكومات والشركاء الأكاديميين في الفترة من 22 يناير الى 24 يناير 2020.

تقرير موجز 3
ربما يكون انتقال فيروس كورونا المستجد (2019-nCov)  من إنسان إلى إنسان التفسيرالوحيد المعقول لمدى تفشي المرض في مدينة ووهان الصينية. ونحن نقد، في المتوسط، أن كل حالة مصابة تسببت بالفعل في نقل العدوى إلى 2.6 (نطاق عدم اليقين: 1.5-3.5) من الأشخاص الآخرين غير المصابين حتى 18 يناير 2020، وذلك استنادًا إلى تحليل يجمع ما بين تقديراتنا السابقة لحجم تفشي المرض في مدينة ووهان مع النمذجة الحسابية للمسارات الوبائية المحتملة. وهذا يعني أن تدابير الرقابة تحتاج إلى الحيلولة دون حدوث ما يزيد عن 60٪ من احتمالية انتقال العدوى، بحيث تكون فعالة في السيطرة على تفشي المرض. ومن المحتمل، استنادًا إلى تجربة فيروس السارس وفيروس كورونا المرتبط بمتلازمة الشرق الأوسط التنفسية (MERS-CoV)، أن يكون عدد الحالات الثانوية الناجمة عن فيروس كورونا المستجد COVID-19))  شديد التباين - حيث لا تسبب العديد من الحالات أي إصابات ثانوية، فيما يمكن أن يسبب عدد قليل منها العديد من الحالات. وتتوقف مسألة ما إذا كان انتقال العدوى يسير بنفس المعدل على فعالية تدابيرالمكافحة الحالية المطبقة في الصين ومدى تبني سكان المناطق المتأثرة سلوكيات الحد من المخاطر. وفي غياب العقاقير أو اللقاحات المضادة للفيروسات، تعتمد آليات المكافحة على الاكتشاف المبكر والعزل الفوري للحالات التي تظهر عليها الأعراض. ومن غير الواضح حاليًا ما إذا كان هذا الوباء سيتفشى داخل الصين، فمازالت هناك حالة من عدم اليقين فيما يخص مدى حدة المرض الناجم عن هذا الفيروس وما إذا كانت الحالات التي تظهر عليها أعراض خفيفة نسبيًا قادرة على نقل الفيروس بفاعلية. لذا، لابد وأن يتم توسيع نطاق الآليات المستخدمة في تحديد الحالات المحتملة واختبارها بقدر ما تسمح به الرعاية الصحية واختبارات التشخيص - بما في ذلك تحديد واختبار وعزل الحالات المشتبه في إصابتها بأعراض خفيفة إلى متوسطة ​​فقط (كتلك التي تشبه أعراض الأنفلونزا)، طالما كان ذلك ممكنًا من الناحية اللوجستية.


 22 يناير2020 - جامعة إمبيريال كوليدجبلندن

تقرير2: تقدير للعدد الإجمالي المحتمل لحالات فيروس كورونا الجديد في مدينة ووهان، الصين

(Download Report 2)‌‌

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Christl Donnelly, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson

منظمة الصحة العالمية المركز المتعاون لنمذجة الأمراض المعدية
مركز مجلس البحوث الطبية لتحليل الأمراض المعدية
معھد عبد اللطیف جمیل لمكافحة الأمراض المزمنة والأوبئة والأزمات الطارئة
جامعة إمبيريال كوليدج لندن، المملكة المتحدة

لتواصل:neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

تقرير موجز 2: 
في 16 يناير، أصدرنا تقديرات لحجم تفشي فيروس كورونا الجديد (nCoV-2019) في الصين بناءً على تحليل لعدد الحالات المكتشفة خارج البر الصيني الرئيسي. منذ ذلك الحين، شهدت حالات الإصابة المؤكدة التي أبلغت عنها السلطات الصينية زيادة بمقدار 10 أضعاف، لتصل إلى 440 بحلول 22 يناير. فيما ارتفع عدد الحالات المكتشفة خارج الصين بذات أعراض الفيروس إلى 7 حالات بحلول 18 يناير. نورد في هذا التقدير الموجز تقديرات محدثة لحجم الوباء في ووهان، بناءً على تحليل لبيانات رحلات الطيران والسكان في المدينة. بحسب تقديراتنا، بلغ عدد الحالات المكتشفة في ووهان والمصابة بذات أعراض الفيروس 4000 حالة حتى 18 يناير، فيما يتراوح نطاق عدم اليقين ما بين 1000 و 700، وهو ما يعكس حجم الحالات المجهولة غير الداخلة في هذه التقديرات. ولابد هنا من الإشارة إلى أن تقديرنا المتوسط البالغ 4000 حالة يتجاوز تقديراتنا السابقة بمقدار الضعف، وذلك نتيجة لزيادة عدد الحالات المكتشفة خارج البر الصيني الرئيسي من 3 إلى 7. ومع ذلك، لا ينبغي تفسير تقديراتنا على أنها تشير إلى أن تفشي المرض قد تضاعف فجأة في الفترة من 12 إلى 18 يناير، ذلك أن التأخير في تأكيد الحالات الجديد والإبلاغ عنها، والمعلومات غير المكتملة حول تواريخ ظهور الأعراض، جنبًا إلى جنب مع الأعداد الصغيرة جدًا للحالات الجديد، كلها تعني أننا غير قادرين على تقدير معدل نمو الوباء بدقة في الوقت الحالي.

 ويشير تحليلنا إلى أن تفشي فيروس الكورونا الجديد (nCoV-2019) قد تسبب في زيادة حالات الإصابة بأمراض الجهاز التنفسي المتوسطة أو الشديدة في ووهان بمعدل أكبر بكثير مما هو مكتشف حاليًا. ومع ذلك، تشير الزيادات السريعة الأخيرة في أرقام الحالات المؤكدة رسميًا في الصين إلى حدوث تحسن كبير في اكتشاف الحالات والإبلاغ عنها في الأيام الأخيرة. ومع إدخال مزيد من التحسينات وتوسيع آليات الرصد (على سبيل المثال، لمقدمي الرعاية الصحية الأولية)، فإننا نأمل أن تقل الفجوة بين تقديراتنا وأرقام الحالات الرسمية. وبالنظر إلى تزايد الأدلة المتزايدة على قابلية انتقال العدوى من إنسان إلى آخر، فسيكون تحسين آليات الكشف السريع عن الحالات ضروريًا إذا ما أريد السيطرة على تفشي الوباء.


17 يناير2020 - جامعة إمبيريال كوليدجبلندن

تقرير1: تقدير للعدد الإجمالي المحتمل لحالات فيروس كورونا الجديد في مدينة ووهان، الصين

(Download Report 1)

Natsuko Imai, Ilaria Dorigatti, Anne Cori, Steven Riley, Neil M. Ferguson‌

منظمة الصحة العالمية المركز المتعاون لنمذجة الأمراض المعدية
مركز مجلس البحوث الطبية لتحليل الأمراض المعدية
معھد عبد اللطیف جمیل لمكافحة الأمراض المزمنة والأوبئة والأزمات الطارئة
جامعة إمبيريال كوليدج لندن، المملكة المتحدة

لتواصل:neil.ferguson@imperial.ac.uk

تقرير موجز 1: 
ثمة حالة متزايدة من الغموض تكتنف جوانب كثيرة لمسألة انتشار فيروس كورونا الجديد في مدينةووهان. كما أن الكشف عن ثلاث حالات خارج الصين (حالتان في تايلاند وواحدة في اليابان) يثير القلق. ونحن نعتقد –  استنادًا إلى بيانات رحلات الطيران والسكان –  أن هناك احتمال يصل إلى 1/574 بأن يسافر الشخص المصاب في ووهان إلى الخارج قبل أن يحصل على الرعاية الطبية. هذا يعني أنه قد يكون هناك أكثر من 1700 حالة (3 × 574) في ووهان حتى الآن، وهو ما يضاعف من احتمالية وجود العديد من الحالات المجهولة، ما يعني أن نطاق عدم اليقين حول هذا التقدير يتراوح من 190 حالة إلى أكثر من 4000 حالة. لكن حجم هذه الأرقام يشير إلى أنه لا يمكن استبعاد انتقال الوباء من الإنسان إلى الإنسان. لذا فإننا نوصى بتفعيل آليات مشددة لرصد الحالات الجديدة، والمشاركة السريعة للمعلومات وتعزيز درجة التأهب والجاهزية لمواجهة الوباء حال تفشيه.