Imperial College London

Mr Ahmed R. Ahmed PhD FRCS

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Clinical Senior Lecturer in Bariatric Surgery
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 8846 1081a.ahmed07

 
 
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Location

 

Charing Cross HospitalCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

239 results found

Ahmad SJ, Degiannis K, Borucki J, Pouwels S, Rawaf DL, Head M, Li CH, Archid R, Ahmed AR, Lala A, Raza W, Mellor K, Wichmann D, Exadaktylos Aet al., 2023, The most influential COVID-19 articles: A systematic review., New Microbes New Infect, Vol: 52, ISSN: 2052-2975

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2),causative pathogen of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has triggered a pandemic with challenges for health care systems around the world. Researchers have studied and published on the subject of SARS-CoV-2 and the disease extensively. What is the significance of articles published, shared and cited in the early stages of such a pandemic? MATERIALS AND METHODS: A systematic literature search in a time frame of 12 months and analysis rating using Principle Component Analysis (PCA) and Multiple Factor Analysis (MFA) were performed. RESULTS: The 100 most cited COVID-19 articles were identified. The majority of these articles were from China (n = 54), followed by United States of America (USA) (n = 21) and United Kingdom (UK) (n = 8). All articles were published in high-ranked, peer-reviewed journals, with research focusing onthe the diagnosis, transmission and therapy of COVID-19. The level of evidence of the 100 most cited COVID-19 articles on average was low. CONCLUSION: In the early stages of a pandemic, new and innovative research can emerge and be highly cited, regardless of the level of evidence.

Journal article

Behary P, Alessimii H, Miras AD, Tharakan G, Alexiadou K, Aldhwayan MM, Purkayastha S, Moorthy K, Ahmed AR, Bloom SR, Tan TMet al., 2023, Tripeptide gut hormone infusion does not alter food preferences or sweet taste function in volunteers with obesity and prediabetes/diabetes but promotes restraint eating: A secondary analysis of a randomized single-blind placebo-controlled study., Diabetes Obes Metab

AIMS: To investigate whether the elevation in postprandial concentrations of the gut hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin (OXM) and peptide YY (PYY) accounts for the beneficial changes in food preferences, sweet taste function and eating behaviour after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a secondary analysis of a randomized single-blind study in which we infused GLP-1, OXM, PYY (GOP) or 0.9% saline subcutaneously for 4 weeks in 24 subjects with obesity and prediabetes/diabetes, to replicate their peak postprandial concentrations, as measured at 1 month in a matched RYGB cohort (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01945840). A 4-day food diary and validated eating behaviour questionnaires were completed. Sweet taste detection was measured using the method of constant stimuli. Correct sucrose identification (corrected hit rates) was recorded, and sweet taste detection thresholds (EC50s: half maximum effective concencration values) were derived from concentration curves. The intensity and consummatory reward value of sweet taste were assessed using the generalized Labelled Magnitude Scale. RESULTS: Mean daily energy intake was reduced by 27% with GOP but no significant changes in food preferences were observed, whereas a reduction in fat and increase in protein intake were seen post-RYGB. There was no change in corrected hit rates or detection thresholds for sucrose detection following GOP infusion. Additionally, GOP did not alter the intensity or consummatory reward value of sweet taste. A significant reduction in restraint eating, comparable to the RYGB group was observed with GOP. CONCLUSION: The elevation in plasma GOP concentrations after RYGB is unlikely to mediate changes in food preferences and sweet taste function after surgery but may promote restraint eating.

Journal article

Bolckmans R, Askari A, Currie A, Ahmed AR, Batterham RL, Byrne J, Hopkins J, Khan OA, Mahawar K, Miras AD, Pring CM, Small PK, Welbourn Ret al., 2023, Clinical characteristics of patients undergoing primary bariatric surgery in the United Kingdom based on the National Bariatric Surgery Registry, CLINICAL OBESITY, ISSN: 1758-8103

Journal article

Ahmed AR, 2023, Innovating in the field of weight loss, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, ISSN: 0007-1323

Journal article

Currie A, Bolckmans R, Askari A, Byrne J, Ahmed AR, Batterham RL, Mahawar K, Miras AD, Pring CM, Small PK, Welbourn Ret al., 2023, Bariatric-metabolic surgery for NHS patients with type 2 diabetes in the United Kingdom National Bariatric Surgery Registry, DIABETIC MEDICINE, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Schutzer-Weissmann J, Wojcikiewicz T, Karmali A, Lukosiute A, Sun R, Ahmed A, Purkayastha S, Brett S, Cousins Jet al., 2023, Apnoeic oxygenation in morbid obesity: a randomised controlled trial comparing facemask and high-flow nasal oxygen delivery, British Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol: 130, Pages: 103-110, ISSN: 0007-0912

BackgroundObesity is a risk factor for airway-related incidents during anaesthesia. High flow nasal oxygen has been advocated to improve safety in high-risk groups but its effectiveness in the obese population is uncertain. This study compared the effect of high flow nasal oxygen and low flow facemask oxygen delivery on duration of apnoea in morbidly-obese patients.MethodsPatients undergoing bariatric surgery were randomly allocated to receive either high flow nasal (70 L min-1) or facemask (15 L min-1) oxygen. Following induction of anaesthesia, morbidly-obese patients were apnoeic for 18 minutes or until oxygen saturation dropped to 92%.ResultsEighty patients were studied (41 high flow nasal oxygen, 39 facemask). Median apnoea duration was 18 minutes in both the high flow nasal oxygen (IQR 18-18 minutes) and the facemask (IQR 4.1-18 minutes) groups. Five patients in the high flow nasal oxygen group and 14 patients in the facemask group desaturated to 92% within 18 minutes. The risk of desaturation was lower in the high flow nasal oxygen group (Hazard Ratio 0.27, 95% CI 0.11-0.65, p=0.007). ConclusionsIn experienced hands, apnoeic oxygenation is possible in the morbidly-obese and was tolerated for 18 minutes by the majority of patients, whether oxygen delivery was high flow nasal or low flow facemask. High flow nasal oxygen reduced desaturation risk compared to facemask oxygen. Desaturation risk is a more clinically relevant outcome than duration of apnoea. Individual physiological factors are likely to be the primary determinant of risk rather than method of oxygen delivery.

Journal article

Ghanem A, Ahmed A, 2022, Day case explantation of a magnetic lower oesophagal sphincter augmentation device due to dysphagia, Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Kowalka AM, Alexiadou K, Cuenco J, Clarke REE, Minnion J, Williams ELL, Bech P, Purkayastha S, Ahmed ARR, Takats Z, Whitwell HJJ, Romero MG, Bloom SRR, Camuzeaux S, Lewis MRR, Khoo B, Tan TM-Met al., 2022, The postprandial secretion of peptide YY1-36 and (3-36) in obesity is differentially increased after gastric bypass versus sleeve gastrectomy, CLINICAL ENDOCRINOLOGY, ISSN: 0300-0664

Journal article

Patel P, Thomas R, Hamady M, Hague J, Raja J, Tan T, Bloom S, Richards T, Weiss C, Prechtl C, Smith C, Thiagarajah S, Fiorentino F, Markakis H, Ahmed ARet al., 2022, O102 We know about left gastric artery embolisation and will embio provide the next solution to treat obesity?, Annual Scientific Meeting of the Surgical-Research-Society, Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Patel P, Thomas R, Hamady M, Hague J, Raja J, Tan T, Bloom S, Richards T, Weiss C, Prechtl C, Smith C, Thiagarajah S, Fiorentino F, Markakis H, Ahmed Aet al., 2022, What we know about left gastric artery embolisation and will EMBIO provide the next solution to treat obesity?, Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: 26-27, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Fehervari M, Ortega P, Muir C, Elliott J, Purkayastha S, Ahmed Aet al., 2022, Single Anastomosis Gastric Bypass as a revision of failed Gastric Band, Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: 19-19, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Ortega PM, Bansi D, Kaur V, Lopes MM, Cousins J, Ahmed Aet al., 2022, Utility of the Apollo OverStitch Device for the endoscopic revision of the gastro-jejunal stoma in patients with weight regain after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: 22-22, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Patel P, Thomas R, Hamady M, Hague J, Raja J, Tan T, Bloom S, Richards T, Weiss C, Prechtl C, Smith C, Thiagarajah S, Fiorentino F, Markakis H, Hesketh R, Foley M, Rajkumar C, Al-Lamee R, Syed S, Nimer A, Walkden M, Viloria E, Garrick F, Guerrero M, Ahmed Aet al., 2022, Simulation training to create the gold standard framework to run the EMBIO trial (left gastric artery embolisation vs placebo), a double blinded, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial., 13th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Obesity-and-Metabolic-Surgery-Society (BOMSS), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: 27-27, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Shibib L, Al-Qaisi M, Ahmed A, Miras AD, Nott D, Pelling M, Greenwald SE, Guess Net al., 2022, Reversal and remission of T2DM - an update for practitioners, Vascular Health and Risk Management, Vol: 18, Pages: 417-443, ISSN: 1176-6344

Over the past 50 years, many countries around the world have faced an unchecked pandemic of obesity and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). As best practice treatment of T2DM has done very little to check its growth, the pandemic of diabesity now threatens to make health-care systems economically more difficult for governments and individuals to manage within their budgets. The conventional view has been that T2DM is irreversible and progressive. However, in 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) global report on diabetes added for the first time a section on diabetes reversal and acknowledged that it could be achieved through a number of therapeutic approaches. Many studies indicate that diabetes reversal, and possibly even long-term remission, is achievable, belying the conventional view. However, T2DM reversal is not yet a standardized area of practice and some questions remain about long-term outcomes. Diabetes reversal through diet is not articulated or discussed as a first-line target (or even goal) of treatment by any internationally recognized guidelines, which are mostly silent on the topic beyond encouraging lifestyle interventions in general. This review paper examines all the sustainable, practical, and scalable approaches to T2DM reversal, highlighting the evidence base, and serves as an interim update for practitioners looking to fill the practical knowledge gap on this topic in conventional diabetes guidelines.

Journal article

Lam K, Nazarian S, Gadi N, Hakky S, Moorthy K, Tsironis C, Ahmed A, Kinross JM, Purkayastha Set al., 2022, Patient perspectives on surgeon-specific outcome reports in bariatric surgery, Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases, Vol: 18, Pages: 704-713, ISSN: 1550-7289

BACKGROUND: Surgeon specific outcome reports (SSOR) in the UK can be accessed freely by the general public to promote transparency and informed decision-making. However, the views amongst bariatric patients concerning these data are unknown. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to determine patient awareness, views and priorities for outcome reporting in bariatric surgery, and to provide recommendations for future surgeon-specific outcome reporting through the United Kingdom National Bariatric Surgery Registry. SETTING: Bariatric surgical unit in a UK university teaching hospital. METHODS: We adapted a previously validated questionnaire and surveyed the views of 150 patients in a single bariatric surgical unit. We collected data concerning awareness, views, and future priorities for outcome reporting. RESULTS: A full 73% of participants were unaware they could access SSOR. Of the participants that were unaware, 75% stated that they would have accessed SSOR had they been aware they could. Of the participants that had previously accessed SSOR, 86% stated they understood the data, although 61% indicated it did not influence their choice of surgeon. The majority of participants favored public release of outcome reports at the surgeon-level (75%) and hospital-level (83%). The 3 main priorities indicated by participants for future outcome reporting were complication rates (91%), patient reported outcome measures (90%), and reoperation rate (89%), all at the surgeon level. CONCLUSION: Patient awareness of outcome reporting is poor. Efforts must be made to increase awareness of SSOR. Patients should be incorporated as key stakeholders in determining future outcome reporting in bariatric surgery.

Journal article

Ruban A, Miras A, glaysher M, Goldstone A, Teare Jet al., 2022, Duodenal-jejunal bypass liner for the management of Type 2 diabetes and obesity: a multicenter randomized controlled trial, Annals of Surgery, Vol: 275, Pages: 440-447, ISSN: 0003-4932

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the clinical efficacy and safety of the duodenal-jejunal bypass liner (DJBL) while in situ for 12 months and for 12 months after explantation.Summary Background Data: This is the largest randomized controlled trial (RCT) of the DJBL, a medical device used for the treatment of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and obesity. Endoscopic interventions have been developed as potential alternatives to those not eligible or fearful of the risks of metabolic surgery.Methods: In this multicenter open-label RCT, 170 adults with inadequately controlled T2DM and obesity were randomized to intensive medical care with or without the DJBL. Primary outcome was the percentage of participants achieving a glycated hemoglobin reduction of ≥20% at 12 months. Secondary outcomes included weight loss and cardiometabolic risk factors at 12 and 24 months.Results: There were no significant differences in the percentage of patients achieving the primary outcome between both groups at 12 months [DJBL 54.6% (n = 30) vs control 55.2% (n = 32); odds ratio (OR) 0.93, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.44–2.0; P = 0.85]. Twenty-four percent (n = 16) patients achieved ≥15% weight loss in the DJBL group compared to 4% (n = 2) in the controls at 12 months (OR 8.3, 95% CI: 1.8–39; P = .007). The DJBL group experienced superior reductions in systolic blood pressure, serum cholesterol, and alanine transaminase at 12 months. There were more adverse events in the DJBL group.Conclusions: The addition of the DJBL to intensive medical care was associated with superior weight loss, improvements in cardiometabolic risk factors, and fatty liver disease markers, but not glycemia, only while the device was in situ. The benefits of the devices need to be balanced against the higher rate of adverse events when making clinical decisions.Trial Registration: ISRCTN30845205. isrctn.org; Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme, a Medical Research

Journal article

Kenkre JS, Malallah K, Davies I, Jones S, Ansari S, Ortega P, Purkayastha S, Ahmed A, Goldin R, Tan Tet al., 2022, Patients with liver fibrosis may be less likely to remit from type 2 diabetes following bariatric surgery, Publisher: WILEY, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Cousin E, Duncan BB, Stein C, Ong KL, Vos T, Abbafati C, Abbasi-Kangevari M, Abdelmasseh M, Abdoli A, Abd-Rabu R, Abolhassani H, Abu-Gharbieh E, Accrombessi MMK, Adnani QES, Afzal MS, Agarwal G, Agrawaal KK, Agudelo-Botero M, Ahinkorah BO, Ahmad S, Ahmad T, Ahmadi K, Ahmadi S, Ahmadi A, Ahmed A, Ahmed Salih Y, Akande-Sholabi W, Akram T, Al Hamad H, Al-Aly Z, Alcalde-Rabanal JE, Alipour V, Aljunid SM, Al-Raddadi RM, Alvis-Guzman N, Amini S, Ancuceanu R, Andrei T, Andrei CL, Anjana RM, Ansar A, Antonazzo IC, Antony B, Anyasodor AE, Arabloo J, Arizmendi D, Armocida B, Artamonov AA, Arulappan J, Aryan Z, Asgari S, Ashraf T, Astell-Burt T, Atorkey P, Atout MMW, Ayanore MA, Badiye AD, Baig AA, Bairwa M, Baker JL, Baltatu OC, Banik PC, Barnett A, Barone MTU, Barone-Adesi F, Barrow A, Bedi N, Belete R, Belgaumi UI, Bell AW, Bennett DA, Bensenor IM, Beran D, Bhagavathula AS, Bhaskar S, Bhattacharyya K, Bhojaraja VS, Bijani A, Bikbov B, Birara S, Bodolica V, Bonny A, Brenner H, Briko NI, Butt ZA, Caetano dos Santos FL, Cámera LA, Campos-Nonato IR, Cao Y, Cao C, Cerin E, Chakraborty PA, Chandan JS, Chattu VK, Chen S, Choi J-YJ, Choudhari SG, Chowdhury EK, Chu D-T, Corso B, Dadras O, Dai X, Damasceno AAM, Dandona L, Dandona R, Dávila-Cervantes CA, De Neve J-W, Denova-Gutiérrez E, Dhamnetiya D, Diaz D, Ebtehaj S, Edinur HA, Eftekharzadeh S, El Sayed I, Elgendy IY, Elhadi M, Elmonem MA, Faisaluddin M, Farooque U, Feng X, Fernandes E, Fischer F, Flood D, Freitas M, Gaal PA, Gad MM, Gaewkhiew P, Getacher L, Ghafourifard M, Ghanei Gheshlagh R, Ghashghaee A, Ghith N, Ghozali G, Gill PS, Ginawi IA, Glushkova EV, Golechha M, Gopalani SV, Guimarães RA, Gupta RD, Gupta R, Gupta VK, Gupta VB, Gupta S, Habtewold TD, Hafezi-Nejad N, Halwani R, Hanif A, Hankey GJ, Haque S, Hasaballah AI, Hasan SS, Hashi A, Hassanipour S, Hay SI, Hayat K, Heidari M, Hossain MBH, Hossain S, Hosseini M, Hoveidamanesh S, Huang J, Humayun A, Hussain R, Hwang B-F, Ibitoye SE, Ikuta KS, Inbaraj LR, Iqbal U, Islam Met al., 2022, Diabetes mortality and trends before 25 years of age: an analysis of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019, The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Vol: 10, Pages: 177-192, ISSN: 2213-8587

BackgroundDiabetes, particularly type 1 diabetes, at younger ages can be a largely preventable cause of death with the correct health care and services. We aimed to evaluate diabetes mortality and trends at ages younger than 25 years globally using data from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD) 2019.MethodsWe used estimates of GBD 2019 to calculate international diabetes mortality at ages younger than 25 years in 1990 and 2019. Data sources for causes of death were obtained from vital registration systems, verbal autopsies, and other surveillance systems for 1990–2019. We estimated death rates for each location using the GBD Cause of Death Ensemble model. We analysed the association of age-standardised death rates per 100 000 population with the Socio-demographic Index (SDI) and a measure of universal health coverage (UHC) and described the variability within SDI quintiles. We present estimates with their 95% uncertainty intervals.FindingsIn 2019, 16 300 (95% uncertainty interval 14 200 to 18 900) global deaths due to diabetes (type 1 and 2 combined) occurred in people younger than 25 years and 73·7% (68·3 to 77·4) were classified as due to type 1 diabetes. The age-standardised death rate was 0·50 (0·44 to 0·58) per 100 000 population, and 15 900 (97·5%) of these deaths occurred in low to high-middle SDI countries. The rate was 0·13 (0·12 to 0·14) per 100 000 population in the high SDI quintile, 0·60 (0·51 to 0·70) per 100 000 population in the low-middle SDI quintile, and 0·71 (0·60 to 0·86) per 100 000 population in the low SDI quintile. Within SDI quintiles, we observed large variability in rates across countries, in part explained by the extent of UHC (r2=0·62). From 1990 to 2019, age-standardised death rates decreased globally by 17·0% (−

Journal article

Jones B, Sands C, Alexiadou K, Minnion J, Tharakan G, Behary P, Ahmed A, Purkayastha S, Lewis M, Bloom S, Li J, Tan Tet al., 2022, The metabolomic effects of tripeptide gut hormone infusion compared to Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and caloric restriction, Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol: 107, Pages: e767-e782, ISSN: 0021-972X

Context: The gut-derived peptide hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin (OXM), and peptide YY (PYY) are regulators of energy intake and glucose homeostasis, and are thought to contribute to the glucose-lowering effects of bariatric surgery. Objective: To establish the metabolomic effects of a combined infusion of GLP-1, OXM and PYY (tripeptide “GOP”) in comparison to a placebo infusion, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery, and a very low-calorie diet (VLCD). Design and setting: Sub-analysis of a single-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study of GOP infusion (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01945840), including VLCD and RYGB comparator groups. Patients and interventions: 25 obese patients with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes were randomly allocated to receive a 4-week subcutaneous infusion of GOP (n=14) or 0.9% saline control (SAL; n=11). An additional 22 patients followed a VLCD, and 21 underwent RYGB surgery. Main outcome measures: Plasma and urine samples collected at baseline and 4 weeks into each intervention were subjected to cross-platform metabolomic analysis, followed by unsupervised and supervised modelling approaches to identify similarities and differences between the effects of each intervention. Results: Aside from glucose, very few metabolites were affected by GOP, contrasting with major metabolomic changes seen with VLCD and RYGB. Conclusions: Treatment with GOP provides a powerful glucose-lowering effect but does not replicate the broader metabolomic changes seen with VLCD and RYGB. The contribution of these metabolomic changes to the clinical benefits of RYGB remains to be elucidated.

Journal article

Wiggins T, Jamel S, Hakky S, Ahmed A, Markar SR, Hanna GBet al., 2021, Assurance of surgical quality within multicenter randomized controlled trials for bariatric and metabolic surgery: a systematic review, 11th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Obesity-and-Metabolic-Surgery-Society (BOMSS), Publisher: ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC, Pages: 124-132, ISSN: 1550-7289

Conference paper

Tankel J, Ahmed AR, 2021, Gastrojejunostomy in Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass for Morbid Obesity: Linear Stapler Length Does Not Affect Mid-term Outcomes, 11th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Obesity-and-Metabolic-Surgery-Society (BOMSS), Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, Pages: 794-798, ISSN: 1530-4515

Conference paper

McLean KA, Kamarajah SK, Chaudhry D, Gujjuri RR, Raubenheimer K, Trout I, AlAmeer E, Creagh-Brown B, Harrison EM, Nepogodiev D, Roslani AC, Li E, Pata F, Medina AR-D, van Ramshorst GH, Valente DCA, Sayyed R, Simoes J, Smart N, Bhangu A, Glasbey JC, Khaw RA, Ahmed W, Akhbari M, Baker D, Borakati A, Mills E, Murray V, Thavayogan R, Yasin I, Glasbey J, Ridley W, Sarrami M, Zhang G, Egoroff N, Pockney P, Richards T, Edwards M, Lee M, Pinkney T, Pearse R, Vohra R, Sohrabi C, Jamieson A, Nguyen M, Rahman A, English C, Tincknell L, Kakodkar P, Kwek I, Punjabi N, Burns J, Varghese S, Erotocritou M, McGuckin S, Vayalapra S, Dominguez E, Moneim J, Bhatia S, Kouli O, Salehi M, Tan HL, Yoong A, Zhu L, Seale B, Nowinka Z, Patel N, Chrisp B, Harris J, Maleyko I, Muneeb F, Gough M, James CE, Skan O, Chowdhury A, Rebuffa N, Khan H, Down B, Fatimah HQ, Siaw-Acheampong K, Benson RA, Bywater E, Dawson BE, Evans JP, Heritage E, Jones CS, Khatri C, Keatley JM, Knight A, Lawday S, Mann HS, Marson EJ, Mckay SC, Mills EC, Pellino G, Picciochi M, Taylor EH, Tiwari A, Simoes JFF, Trout IM, Venn ML, Wilkin RJW, Smart NJ, Minaya-Bravo A, Gallo G, Moug S, Di Saverio S, Vallance A, Vimalchandran D, Griffiths EA, Evans RPT, Townend P, Roberts K, McKay S, Isaac J, Satoi S, Edwards J, Coonar AS, Marchbank A, Caruana EJ, Layton GR, Patel A, Brunelli A, Ford S, Desai A, Gronchi A, Fiore M, Almond M, Tirotta F, Dumitra S, Kolias A, Price SJ, Fountain DM, Jenkinson MD, Hutchinson P, Marcus HJ, Piper RJ, Lippa L, Servadei F, Esene I, Freyschlag C, Neville I, Rosseau G, Schaller K, Demetriades AK, Robertson F, Alamri A, Shaw R, Schache AG, Winter SC, Ho M, Nankivell P, Biel JR, Batstone M, Ganly I, Vidya R, Wilkins A, Singh JK, Thekinkattil D, Sundar S, Fotopoulou C, Leung E, Khan T, Chiva L, Sehouli J, Fagotti A, Cohen P, Gutelkin M, Ghebre R, Konney T, Pareja R, Bristow R, Dowdy S, Rajkumar STS, Ng J, Fujiwara K, Stewart GD, Lamb B, Narahari K, McNeill A, Colquhoun A, McGrath J, Bromage S, Barod R, Kaset al., 2021, Death following pulmonary complications of surgery before and during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, BRITISH JOURNAL OF SURGERY, Vol: 108, Pages: 1448-1464, ISSN: 0007-1323

Journal article

Ghanem A, Ahmed A, 2021, Revision of failed Vertical Banded Gastroplasty (VBG) to Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass (RYGB), 12th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Obesity-and-Metabolic-Surgery-Society (BOMSS), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S11-S11, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Ortega PM, Ahmed A, Bansi D, Cousins Jet al., 2021, Duodenal switch revision: importance of intraoperative endoscopy, 12th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Obesity-and-Metabolic-Surgery-Society (BOMSS), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S11-S12, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Ortega PM, Ahmed A, Valencia JM, 2021, Managing severe abdominal pain 3 years after RYGB: resection of marginal ulcer and primary GJ reconstruction, 12th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Obesity-and-Metabolic-Surgery-Society (BOMSS), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S12-S12, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Patel K, Aggarwal R, Martin G, Bicknell C, Ahmed Aet al., 2021, Feasibility of a multi-parametric continuous monitoring wearable device in patients undergoing bariatric surgery, 12th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Obesity-and-Metabolic-Surgery-Society (BOMSS), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S12-S12, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Malallah K, Alexiadou K, Tabbakh Y, Ahmed A, Purkayastha S, Tsironis C, Hakky S, Chahal H, Tan Tet al., 2021, Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and Sleeve Gastrectomy exhibit energy expenditure equally one-year post-surgery, 12th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Obesity-and-Metabolic-Surgery-Society (BOMSS), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S8-S9, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Davies I, Kenkre J, Alexiadou K, Malallah K, Ilesanmi Y, Ansari S, Kamocka A, Chahal H, Tsironis C, Hakky S, Ahmed A, Purkayastha S, Tan Tet al., 2021, Can current methods of predicting T2D remission following metabolic surgery be improved?, 12th Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Obesity-and-Metabolic-Surgery-Society (BOMSS), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S13-S13, ISSN: 0960-8923

Conference paper

Glasbey J, Ademuyiwa A, Adisa A, AlAmeer E, Arnaud AP, Ayasra F, Azevedo J, Minaya-Bravo A, Costas-Chavarri A, Edwards J, Elhadi M, Fiore M, Fotopoulou C, Gallo G, Ghosh D, Griffiths EA, Harrison E, Hutchinson P, Lawani I, Lawday S, Lederhuber H, Leventoglu S, Li E, Gomes GMA, Mann H, Marson EJ, Martin J, Mazingi D, McLean K, Modolo M, Moore R, Morton D, Ntirenganya F, Pata F, Picciochi M, Pockney P, Ramos-De la Medina A, Roberts K, Roslani AC, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam R, Shaw R, Simões JFF, Smart N, Stewart GD, Sullivan R, Sundar S, Tabiri S, Taylor EH, Vidya R, Nepogodiev D, Bhangu A, Glasbey JC, McLean K, Nepogodiev D, Harrison E, Bhangu AA, Nepogodiev D, Siaw-Acheampong K, Benson RA, Bywater E, Chaudhry D, Dawson BE, Evans JP, Glasbey JC, Gujjuri RR, Heritage E, Jones CS, Kamarajah SK, Khatri C, Khaw RA, Keatley JM, Knight A, Lawday S, Li E, Mann HS, Marson EJ, McLean KA, Mckay SC, Mills EC, Pellino G, Picciochi M, Taylor EH, Tiwari A, Simoes JFF, Trout IM, Venn ML, Wilkin RJW, Bhangu A, Glasbey JC, Smart NJ, Minaya-Bravo A, Evans JP, Gallo G, Moug S, Pata F, Pockney P, Di Saverio S, Vallance A, Vimalchandran D, Griffiths EA, Kamarajah SK, Evans RPT, Townend P, Roberts K, McKay S, Isaac J, Satoi S, Edwards J, Coonar AS, Marchbank A, Caruana EJ, Layton GR, Patel A, Brunelli A, Ford S, Desai A, Gronchi A, Fiore M, Almond M, Tirotta F, Dumitra S, Kolias A, Price SJ, Fountain DM, Jenkinson MD, Hutchinson P, Marcus HJ, Piper RJ, Lippa L, Servadei F, Esene I, Freyschlag C, Neville I, Rosseau G, Schaller K, Demetriades AK, Robertson F, Alamri A, Shaw R, Schache AG, Winter SC, Ho M, Nankivell P, Rey Biel J, Batstone M, Ganly I, Vidya R, Wilkins A, Singh JK, Thekinkattil D, Sundar S, Fotopoulou C, Leung EYL, Khan T, Chiva L, Sehouli J, Fagotti A, Cohen P, Gutelkin M, Ghebre R, Konney T, Pareja R, Bristow R, Dowdy S, Shylasree TS, Kottayasamy Seenivasagam R, Ng J, Fujiwara K, Stewart GD, Lamb B, Narahari K, McNeill A, Colquhoun A, McGrath JS, Bromage S, Barod R, Kasivisvaet al., 2021, Effect of COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns on planned cancer surgery for 15 tumour types in 61 countries: an international, prospective, cohort study, The Lancet Oncology, Vol: 22, Pages: 1507-1517, ISSN: 1470-2045

BackgroundSurgery is the main modality of cure for solid cancers and was prioritised to continue during COVID-19 outbreaks. This study aimed to identify immediate areas for system strengthening by comparing the delivery of elective cancer surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic in periods of lockdown versus light restriction.MethodsThis international, prospective, cohort study enrolled 20 006 adult (≥18 years) patients from 466 hospitals in 61 countries with 15 cancer types, who had a decision for curative surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic and were followed up until the point of surgery or cessation of follow-up (Aug 31, 2020). Average national Oxford COVID-19 Stringency Index scores were calculated to define the government response to COVID-19 for each patient for the period they awaited surgery, and classified into light restrictions (index <20), moderate lockdowns (20–60), and full lockdowns (>60). The primary outcome was the non-operation rate (defined as the proportion of patients who did not undergo planned surgery). Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used to explore the associations between lockdowns and non-operation. Intervals from diagnosis to surgery were compared across COVID-19 government response index groups. This study was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04384926.FindingsOf eligible patients awaiting surgery, 2003 (10·0%) of 20 006 did not receive surgery after a median follow-up of 23 weeks (IQR 16–30), all of whom had a COVID-19-related reason given for non-operation. Light restrictions were associated with a 0·6% non-operation rate (26 of 4521), moderate lockdowns with a 5·5% rate (201 of 3646; adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0·81, 95% CI 0·77–0·84; p<0·0001), and full lockdowns with a 15·0% rate (1775 of 11 827; HR 0·51, 0·50–0·53; p<0·0001). In sensitivity analyses, including adjustment for SARS-CoV-2 case notif

Journal article

Eslam M, Ahmed A, Despres J-P, Jha V, Halford JCG, Chieh JTW, Harris DCH, Nangaku M, Colagiuri S, Targher G, Joshi S, Byrne CD, Khunti K, Nguyen MH, Gish RG, George Jet al., 2021, Incorporating fatty liver disease in multidisciplinary care and novel clinical trial designs for patients with metabolic diseases, LANCET GASTROENTEROLOGY & HEPATOLOGY, Vol: 6, Pages: 743-753

Journal article

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