Imperial College London

ProfessorAndrewAmis

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering

Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7062a.amis

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Fabienne Laperche +44 (0)20 7594 7033

 
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Location

 

713City and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

442 results found

AMIS AA, CAMPBELL JR, MILLER JH, 1985, STRENGTH OF CARBON AND POLYESTER FIBER TENDON REPLACEMENTS - VARIATION AFTER OPERATION IN RABBITS, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 67, Pages: 829-834, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

DAWKINS GPC, AMIS AA, 1985, A FUNCTIONAL-STUDY OF THE STRUCTURE OF THE ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT, RELATED TO KNEE STABILITY, INJURY MECHANISMS AND PROSTHETIC LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTIONS, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 67, Pages: 844-844, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

AMIS AA, CAMPBELL JR, MILLER JH, 1985, THE POSTOPERATIVE STRENGTH VARIATIONS OF CARBON OR POLYESTER FIBER TENDON REPLACEMENTS, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 67, Pages: 159-159, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

Amis AA, Miller JH, 1984, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, AND CLINICAL TRAIL OF A MODULAR ELBOW REPLACEMENT INCORPORATING CEMENT-FREE FIXATION., Pages: 121-126

This paper describes the design process leading to a total elbow replacement with components which have an accurate anatomical shape and require minimal bone resection. This allows a 'modular' approach to elbow reconstruction, i. e. radial head replacement alone; humeral hemiarthroplasty; humero-radial or ulnar replacement; or total (three component) reconstruction. This approach means that the surgeon may choose to replace only the damaged joint surfaces, rather than being committed to total replacement. The parallel development of instruments for accurate bone forming is also described, allowing firm and precise fixation of prosthetic components without bone cement, a necessity for interlocking bone ingrowth to occur without extended immobilization. A clinical trial of these components, in more than fifty patients for periods up to five years, is reviewed.

Conference paper

Amis AA, Miller JH, 1984, Design, development, and clinical trial of a modular elbow replacement incorporating cement-free fixation., Eng Med, Vol: 13, Pages: 175-179, ISSN: 0046-2039

Journal article

AMIS AA, CAMPBELL JR, KEMPSON SA, MILLER JHet al., 1984, COMPARISON OF THE STRUCTURE OF NEOTENDONS INDUCED BY IMPLANTATION OF CARBON OR POLYESTER FIBERS, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 66, Pages: 131-139, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

RYMASZEWSKI LA, MACKAY I, AMIS AA, MILLER JHet al., 1984, LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF EXCISION OF THE RADIAL HEAD IN RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 66, Pages: 109-113, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

AMIS AA, SEEDHOM BB, 1983, DESIGN FACTORS FOR POLYETHYLENE PROSTHESIS COMPONENTS, WITH PARTICULAR REFERENCE TO THE SHEEHAN KNEE IMPLANT, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 65, Pages: 367-367, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

AMIS AA, MILLER JH, CAMPBELL JR, KEMPSON S, WRIGHT V, DOWSON Det al., 1982, FILAMENTOUS IMPLANT RECONSTRUCTION OF TENDON DEFECTS - A COMPARISON BETWEEN CARBON AND POLYESTER FIBERS, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 64, Pages: 622-622, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

AMIS AA, MILLER JH, 1982, THE ELBOW, CLINICS IN RHEUMATIC DISEASES, Vol: 8, Pages: 571-593, ISSN: 0307-742X

Journal article

AMIS AA, HUGHES SJ, MILLER JH, WRIGHT Vet al., 1982, A FUNCTIONAL-STUDY OF THE RHEUMATOID ELBOW, RHEUMATOLOGY AND REHABILITATION, Vol: 21, Pages: 151-157, ISSN: 0035-3396

Journal article

WEIGHTMAN B, AMIS AA, 1982, FINGER JOINT FORCE PREDICTIONS RELATED TO DESIGN OF JOINT REPLACEMENTS, JOURNAL OF BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING, Vol: 4, Pages: 197-205, ISSN: 0141-5425

Journal article

AMIS AA, MILLER JH, CAMPBELL JR, KEMPSON S, WRIGHT V, DOWSON Det al., 1981, FILAMENTOUS IMPLANT RECONSTRUCTION OF TENDON DEFECTS, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 63, Pages: 296-296, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

Amis AA, Miller JH, Dowson D, Wright Vet al., 1981, Biomechanical aspects of the elbow: Joint forces related to prosthesis design, Engineering in Medicine, Vol: 10, Pages: 65-68, ISSN: 0046-2039

This paper has neglected subjects such as the movements allowed by the articulation at the elbow, or description of the joint itself, which could explain many other aspects of the biomechanical function of this joint. It was felt, however, that at this juncture it was important to concentrate on describing the large forces which the elbow must withstand, and the manner in which it acts. This is the key to successful mechanical design of an elbow joint replacement.

Journal article

AMIS AA, MILLER JH, DOWSON D, WRIGHT Vet al., 1980, ELBOW JOINT FORCES - BASIC DATA FOR PROSTHESIS DESIGNERS, JOURNAL OF BONE AND JOINT SURGERY-BRITISH VOLUME, Vol: 62, Pages: 251-252, ISSN: 0301-620X

Journal article

AMIS AA, DOWSON D, WRIGHT V, 1980, ANALYSIS OF ELBOW FORCES DUE TO HIGH-SPEED FOREARM MOVEMENTS, JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS, Vol: 13, Pages: 825-831, ISSN: 0021-9290

Journal article

AMIS AA, DOWSON D, WRIGHT V, 1980, ELBOW JOINT FORCE PREDICTIONS FOR SOME STRENUOUS ISOMETRIC ACTIONS, JOURNAL OF BIOMECHANICS, Vol: 13, Pages: 765-775, ISSN: 0021-9290

Journal article

AMIS AA, HUGHES S, MILLER JH, WRIGHT V, DOWSON Det al., 1979, ELBOW JOINT FORCES IN PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID-ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOLOGY AND REHABILITATION, Vol: 18, Pages: 230-234, ISSN: 0035-3396

Journal article

AMIS AA, DOWSON D, WRIGHT V, MILLER JHet al., 1979, DERIVATION OF ELBOW JOINT FORCES, AND THEIR RELATION TO PROSTHESIS DESIGN, JOURNAL OF MEDICAL ENGINEERING & TECHNOLOGY, Vol: 3, Pages: 229-234, ISSN: 0309-1902

Journal article

Amis AA, Dowson D, Wright V, 1979, Muscle strengths and musculo-skeletal geometry of the upper limb, Engineering in Medicine, Vol: 8, Pages: 41-48, ISSN: 0046-2039

A survey of past literature has shown that there is a lack of reliable data for use in prediction of joint forces in the upper limb although this is desirable when developing joint replacements. Upper limb geometry has been analysed, leading to muscle moment arm data at the wrist and elbow. The variation of these moment arms during elbow flexion has also been examined. Analysis of the dimensions of muscles has enabled their relative strengths to be predicted, based on their 'physiological cross-sections'. When used in conjunction with published emg data, this information will enable elbow and wrist joint forces to be estimated more realistically than has previously been possible.

Journal article

Ellis MI, Seedhom BB, Amis AA, 1979, Forces in the knee joint whilst rising from normal and motorized chairs, Engineering in Medicine, Vol: 8, Pages: 33-40, ISSN: 0046-2039

Knee joint forces were determined by kinesiological techniques using a high speed camera and force platforms so that a comparison could be made for rising from a normal chair without the aid of arms and with the aid of a motorized chair. For rising from a normal chair, the knee joint forces parallel to the long axis of the tibia at the point of contact between the tibia and femur, were found to be up to seven times body weight at about the time when the body left contact with the chair. Using a motorized chair the knee joint forces were reduced to less than body weight until normal standing was achieved.

Journal article

Amis AA, Dowson D, Unsworth A, 1977, An examination of the elbow articulation with particular reference to variation of the carrying angle, Engineering in Medicine, Vol: 6, Pages: 76-80, ISSN: 0046-2039

Radiology showed that the articular surfaces were of constant shape, and that male elbows were significantly larger than those of females. A goniometer was devised, to measure lateral forearm movements during flexion. This was rigidly mounted on the humerus, using an articular template to ensure that its axis was coincident with that of the elbow. Results showed that the collateral ligaments allowed the forearm approximately nine degrees of lateral movement. The average locus of forearm movement closely followed a sinusoidal variation. This corresponded to a fixed flexion axis which bisected the obtuse angle between the axis of humerus and forearm, with the forearm fully extended. It was concluded that for an elbow prosthesis, an anatomical shape could be used and that a fixed flexion axis would reproduce natural motion.

Journal article

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